The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying

The Steps to Financial Freedom Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying With a new preface that reflects personal finance today New York Times bestselling author and leading financial expert Suze Orman shares a refreshed version of The Steps to Financial Freedom the r

  • Title: The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying
  • Author: Suze Orman
  • ISBN: 9780307345844
  • Page: 468
  • Format: Paperback
  • With a new preface that reflects personal finance today, New York Times bestselling author and leading financial expert Suze Orman shares a refreshed version of The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom, the revolutionary, groundbreaking classic that changed the way we think, feel, and act about money Unlike traditional money management books, 9 Steps approaches money from an emotWith a new preface that reflects personal finance today, New York Times bestselling author and leading financial expert Suze Orman shares a refreshed version of The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom, the revolutionary, groundbreaking classic that changed the way we think, feel, and act about money Unlike traditional money management books, 9 Steps approaches money from an emotional and spiritual point of view, emphasizing that fear, shame, and anger are the main obstacles to wealth Now, in these turbulent economic times, Suze s life changing message from fifteen years ago is important than ever This reissued version of shows you That debt is bondage and how best to break free of it Why the less you have, the you need a revocable living trust How to find the best financial adviser look in the mirror How to avoid being taken advantage of when buying life insurance Which retirement accounts make sense and which do not In nine simple steps, you ll learn all you need to know to be responsible with and respectful of the money you have and the money you don t have Embrace Suze s groundbreaking philosophy that you are worth than your money and understand the true meaning of wealth so you can live a life without regrets If you do not have control over the money in your life right now, Suze s nine steps to financial freedom are for you.

    One thought on “The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying”

    1. While I was feeling sick and depressed last week, I decided thinking about finances probably wouldn't make things any worse, so I picked up this book. Suze Orman has been recommended to me before, though I think the book I was actually supposed to read was The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous, and Broke. However, that one was not available at the Goodwill for $1.99, and this one was, so this is the one I picked up.And, freakish pictures of the author aside, I'm not sorry I picked it up. As far [...]

    2. it's a great book it has many tips for money management and concepts.But unfortunately most of the book is not valid for who lives outside US most of the book is talking about life insurance, 401k, some taxes rules how to manage stocks, how to deal with credit card and visa and retirement plansI advise those who lives in US to read it will be very useful otherwise don't waste your time genereal money management tips can be easier to get through videos

    3. Orman filled my need for financial instruction in a way no other book has. The shrink approach to understanding your money and the uses for it sooths the troubled heart of the debtor and bolsters the stride of the young investor. The book asks you to step back and look at what you want, maybe reforms what you want into what is best, and then throws you head on into how to get what is best for you. I am now a consumer of action, and I'm headed out to get what's best for me.

    4. This is much like Orman's other books of financial advice, but aimed at women, and encouraging them to take back the power, and control over their own lives and finances. Lots of good practical advice for tough financial times.

    5. This book was pretty light and very emotionally-driven. Not so much hard and concrete advice, like a 50-30-20 rule (All Your Worth), but more about how you feel about money and what you’re hoping to accomplish. It can’t hope to live up to its title, “9 Steps to Financial *Freedom*” because, to me, freedom means not doing anything I don’t want to do for money. It reminds me of another book title, “Tap dancing to work” and the sentiment, “If you love what you do, you never have to [...]

    6. Ah, Suze Orman. I have found her. No longer am I idly reading her column in O magazine, only because I am intrigued by her statement jewellery. Oh no. I have officially read one of her books, The 9 Steps, and I have been converted.In fact, I’ve read it more than once. I took it on vacation, and despite being on a plane or train, I couldn’t stop reading it. And re-reading it. The stigma of reading a personal finance book in a public place didn’t bother me, I loved the book so much. I have p [...]

    7. I will likely be starting my first real job in the next couple months so I decided I should learn more about finances in general. As a student, it is fairly easy because no matter what, my wife and I will be spending more than we bring in. Now, with a real job, things will be different. I really like the way Suze explains concepts. She always follows up definitions with concrete examples which helps a lot when you don't know much about the world of finances and retirement. She also spends a lot [...]

    8. Although my copy of the book was published in 2000 (just bought it on a whim from a second hand book shop a few days ago) and although this is written for Americans and their financial systems it was still very very relevant. It inspired me to spend a few hours consolidating my own finances and open my eyes to some of the things I am not doing as well as I could.I am glad to see that in her own philosophy Suze is using an old adage we have in Bosnia that says: 'the more you give the more you hav [...]

    9. A bit repetative to all the other Suze Orman books I have read(and I did read them all). I am not a big person when it comes to putting money with "spiritual" self, so I did have a bit of a difficult time with this one where I don't normally have that issue with her books.

    10. I read the older version of this book written in 1997. Suze explains the simplicity of finance, you can't earn more than up spend. What I liked is that's he had very realistic methods to cut debt specially when dealing with multiple credit cards. She also had some great advice about creating a trust instead of a will and long term care insurance. While the advice is about 1997 a lot of her advice about Roth IRA and 401 K would still hold today. She also explains how to pass on this advice to chi [...]

    11. The subtitle says it all: practical and spiritual.When I first read this book a few years back I was surprised and pleased to finally read a money book that wasn't all about the money. Instead, it places money in the context of the many calls that women, in particular, have on their time and money that can make it difficult to get ahead. I think the most important contribution it makes is encouraging women to take care of their long-term financial needs so that they can take care of others. A fi [...]

    12. Good advice to startReally good advice to start out on the road to financial freedom. I think that that is for those persons like myself who want encouragement. This is will give you some excellent advice when dealing with brokers, financial institutions, lawyers etc. Also gives the basics on types of retirement and investment accounts along with introductory terms. Once you finish this book you will feel more empowered to control your money.

    13. The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom Suze gives clear advice and empowers women to take an interest and become involved in the family finances. Advice provided throughout the book is useful and builds on examples included through real life stories and general financial knowledge. She breaks down the journey into small manageable steps and mini substeps.

    14. It took me a while to get through this book but she does espouse a philosophy that is hard to combat. And even harder to live by; but my feeling with financial self-help books is that they plant good seeds.

    15. Out of date without any doubt – the author keeps on telling that you can invest easily at 8% interest! – nonetheless it was an interesting listening. I did not know how the 401K worked so I learnt something.

    16. I took my time reading this book and doing each exercise. I have been reading several financial books lately and I learn from all of them but this book got to the heart of the matter. Suze approaches finances from a different perspective that resonated with me. I am forever changed because of the healing and teaching I found. I highly recommend this book.

    17. It's a decent book but it's meant for Americans as some content wasn't as applicable to non Americans. The book is a bit dated but the overall message about money is good.

    18. There was some good information in this book. The best part I found was about investing, stocks, bonds, and compound interest. She has excellent things to say on these topics.

    19. I liked Suze Orman's approach to finances. I definitely gained some good advice from her book. The parts that struck me the most were the beginning and the end. I liked step 1,2,7,8,9. The steps in the middle were interesting but not all of them pertained to me and it started to feel like a textbook. I borrowed this book from the library. I would like to obtain a copy to refer back to some parts later, but I felt a little overwhelmed with all the things I was supposed to do in the middle. Steps [...]

    20. In Suze Orman’s The 9 Steps To Financial Freedom, she outlines the most important and basic principles of managing one’s wealth. The world of finance is quite difficult for many to grasp, let alone comprehend. However, Orman uses personal stories from her experience as an investment banker and broker to stories of her clients which resonate with the reader. She introduces concepts of mutual funds but explains it so an “average Joe” like myself can understand its purpose, and how it might [...]

    21. The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom is one of Suze Orman's early books, if not the earliest - it was originally published in 1997, and so in the specifics all of her advice is suspect, as the economic and legal situation has changed in fifteen years. Beyond that, well, I can see why some people hate her.For one thing, from my moderately-read layman's perspective, her advice is very conservative. Lots of emphasis on retirement planning and long-term investing, next to nothing about short-term or day [...]

    22. Suze Orman has nine steps to financial freedom. The first three are very basic things about trying to determine your past and your feelings about money. She tries to get to the root of why you act the way you do about your finances. The next three steps are the practical steps about handling and investing money in the right way (get out of debt, wills, trusts etc). The last three steps are her "spiritual" steps to financial freedom. Overall, I have read enough personal finance information that I [...]

    23. This was one of the first financial books I ever found years ago (& I think is still one of the only) that addresses both the WHY of how we behave with money - through her and her clients' stories and then personal reflection - and the HOW of managing your money responsibly. She gives lots of practical financial information and guidance on how to decide the right things to do with your money FOR YOURSELF. & if you decide at some point the right thing is hiring someone else to help you, s [...]

    24. So I read the 1997 version of this book not knowing that there was an updated version. I don't think my library had the updated version. But I'm still happy with having read the original version. Even though parts of it were dated (America Online, anyone?), the basic gist of the book was solid. And I'm sure that Suze Orman is still giving people the same advice today. (If she's not, then this version of the book should really be recalled!) This is a pretty powerful book, and it makes you take a [...]

    25. I watch Suze Orman's show and am familiar with her financial philosophy and approach to money. This book fleshes this out a bit more and offers sound advice. I like that she has a holistic approach to money; believing that it has an energy of its own. Throughout her book, she talks about how important it is to respect your money, to respect the energy it has- the dharmic energy- and that when you take care of it, it will take care of you. I had my own action list of five things to do as a result [...]

    26. Another one from Spencer's finance class. What I liked best about this book is that it begins by encouraging you to address the issues that you have about money, before you start trying to manage it. Brilliant. The second thing I liked about it is that it encourages you to get your affairs in order for peace of mind, and by 'affairs' it doesn't mean current income/expenditures, it means will, trusts, medical affidavits and so on, so that if anything happens your heirs and loved ones will have th [...]

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