You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You

You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You In her long awaited new collection the Colt Peacekeeper of American politicalhumor draws a bead on targets that range from the Libido in Chief to NewtGingrich campaign funny money to the legislative

  • Title: You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You
  • Author: Molly Ivins
  • ISBN: 9780679754879
  • Page: 272
  • Format: Paperback
  • In her long awaited new collection, the Colt Peacekeeper of American politicalhumor draws a bead on targets that range from the Libido in Chief to NewtGingrich, campaign funny money to the legislative lunacy of her native Texas andhits a bull s eye every time.Whether she s writing about Bill Clinton The Rodney Dangerfield ofpresidents , Bob Dole Dole contributed perhIn her long awaited new collection, the Colt Peacekeeper of American politicalhumor draws a bead on targets that range from the Libido in Chief to NewtGingrich, campaign funny money to the legislative lunacy of her native Texas andhits a bull s eye every time.Whether she s writing about Bill Clinton The Rodney Dangerfield ofpresidents , Bob Dole Dole contributed perhaps the funniest line of the yearwith his immortal observation that tobacco is not addictive but that too muchmilk might be bad for us The check from the dairy lobby must have been latethat week , or cultural trends I saw a restaurant in Seattle that specializedin latte and barbecue Barbecue and latte I came home immediately , Mollytakes on the issues of the day with her trademark good sense and inimitable wit.

    One thought on “You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You”

    1. I absolutely adored Molly Ivins columns during my brief time living in Austin in the 90s and this collection of essays is spectacular. No one describes the disaster that poses as politics in Texas better than veteran reporter Molly Ivins. The only regret is that she passed away too early to give us her insights into Drumpf!

    2. Love Molly Ivins and miss her terribly. As to the content of the book? These editorials were written in the Clinton years after the radical right took over the congress and threatened to shut down the government. There wasn't a single essay that couldn't be written with a couple of name changes in today's political climate. Deja vu all over again!

    3. One of America's most underrated humorists. Molly had a keen eye towards politics and human nature. Folksy funny but with intelligence.

    4. The more of her stuff I read, the more I fall in love with Molly. You were took from us before your time, kid. Our loss.

    5. "It's been five years since Molly Ivins' last book, which is probably too long a time in the opinion of her many fans. But the intervening years have given the bestselling author and syndicated columnist some of the best raw material a political writer could ask for. The Republicans staged a revolution, Clinton was reelected, welfare 'deform' swept the country, and the militia movement came out of the bunker: in short, it's been a banner time for Molly's brand of shoot-from-the-hip commentary an [...]

    6. I first read Molly Ivins when I came across her book titled "Shrub". Damn funny and insightful I wish more people had read it before the 2000 election. Well, to late, and unfortunately she wasn't around for the election in 2016. But, after reading "You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You" I'll bet it would have been funny, satiric, and have the Donald in the corner, crying! Yeah, a lot of us would have loved it! If you haven't yet, read her books and see for yourself. ( )

    7. Columns from the Clinton era. Some could be republished today with only a few name changes to reflect current conditions. Others are clearly historic, such as her tributes to Ann Richards, Bob Bullock, and Barbara Jordan.As I've said before, I miss Molly's insight and wit and in many ways wish we still had her around to comment on today's political circus.

    8. The thing I like most about this book is her stern accusation toward the bigwigs in the White House and Pentagon together with the faceless but extremely powerful, the sinister MAFIA BOSSES ( my term) who own and operating all big corporations producing all kind of military weaponry and supplies , who secretly through their agents in the White House and the Pentagon, wagging wars all over this planet. Together they rake in huge, obscene profit, and happily dividing it among them at the cost of m [...]

    9. Ah, this book brought back memories of those golden days of yore--the graft, corruption, name-calling, scandel ridden Clinton years. Molly Ivins, the Pulitzer prize winning political columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, has been called a human oxymoron--a Texas liberal. While I grew a tad tired of the down-home talk, this collection of political columns and magazine articles was both entertaining and preachy about politics during the Clinton years. It also took aim at and took a direct hi [...]

    10. Her insight in to the political Bigwigs in the 90s was right on target and eerily true to reflect what continues to go on today. Wish it wasn't so that the political climate is so toxic and continually so. What to do? While she's no longer with us to provide us her wit and humor, I hope her spirit lives on.

    11. This is a realistically chilling book. It ends about 1998, with the death of Nixon and the end of the Clinton administration. But it foretells the incredible gridlock of the Obama years and the intransigence of the Congress towards the executive Molly has a perspective that cannot be denied. Guidance is not in her pervay.

    12. It's Molly Ivins-what can you say. Down to earth intellectualism from a Texas liberal with prescient observations that could easily be columns that fit today's politics. She was a national treasure. Loved this anthology of her work.

    13. Her usual funny take on the political world, including an interesting reasoning for why Clinton is such a compromiser on EVERYthing! And a nice, heartfelt tribute to her mother. Good selection (of her columns?)

    14. I like Molly. She values humor to illustrate liberal politics. Emphasis on humor. Apparently, she can't live long outside of Texas, because she encounters so much good story material there.

    15. The great strength of his book are the obituaries she writes about the dying lions of liberalism and her parents. Much meaning to take from all that.

    16. A fascinating collection of columns written during the Clinton years. They still resonate and I still miss Molly.

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