Japanese Eyes, American Heart

Japanese Eyes American Heart Gathered here for the first time re dozens of deeply personal stories many of them written by the subjects themselves that reveal the hardship sorrow and anguish as well as the pride compassion an

  • Title: Japanese Eyes, American Heart
  • Author: Hawaii Nikkei History Editorial Board
  • ISBN: 9781935690
  • Page: 373
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Gathered here for the first time re dozens of deeply personal stories, many of them written by the subjects themselves, that reveal the hardship, sorrow and anguish as well as the pride, compassion and even laughter experienced by Japanese Americans living in Hawaii following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 These stories of quiet strength and enduring resGathered here for the first time re dozens of deeply personal stories, many of them written by the subjects themselves, that reveal the hardship, sorrow and anguish as well as the pride, compassion and even laughter experienced by Japanese Americans living in Hawaii following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 These stories of quiet strength and enduring resiliency give rare insight into the seeds of change that transformed postwar Hawaii and define the legacy that this wartime generation passed down to those of us who follow.

    One thought on “Japanese Eyes, American Heart”

    1. INTERESTING, POIGNANT, AND INFORMATIVE." 'Sonna baka na koto ga aruka!' ('Such a ridiculous event could never happen!'). That was our dad's response when we told him we had heard that Japan had attacked Pearl Harbor."—Kimi Matsuda, Nisei, Kakaako, Oahu—Loc 784/3796"By 1940, the Japanese made up nearly 43% of Hawaii's population."—Loc 207/3796[In December, 1941] "Cadets of Japanese ancestry made up at least 60 to 75 percent of the UH ROTC."—Loc 2494/3796What a different experience World W [...]

    2. This is a continuation of a project to get oral histories from Japanese American WWII veterans from Hawaii. This time those on the home front get to give their perspectives of the days following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. I liked it. “Everyday” individuals gave their observations. The bottom line of nearly all that shared were feelings of confusion, anger and fear. It clearly illustrated how cruel and intrusive government can be when they can uproot families and summarily confine them. In [...]

    3. The stories of these ordinary people in extraordinary times were entertaining, uplifting and amazing. This is a side of WWII that I had not examined.

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