The Sunlit Zone

The Sunlit Zone The Sunlit Zone is a moving elegy of love and loss admirable for its narrative sweep and the family dynamic that drives it A risk taking work of rare imaginative power The Sunlit Zone combines the n

  • Title: The Sunlit Zone
  • Author: LisaJacobson.
  • ISBN: 9780734047465
  • Page: 291
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Sunlit Zone is a moving elegy of love and loss, admirable for its narrative sweep and the family dynamic that drives it A risk taking work of rare, imaginative power The Sunlit Zone combines the narrative drive of the novel with the perfect pitch of true poetry A darkly futuristic vision shot through with bolts of light Brilliant, poignant, disconcerting AdrianThe Sunlit Zone is a moving elegy of love and loss, admirable for its narrative sweep and the family dynamic that drives it A risk taking work of rare, imaginative power The Sunlit Zone combines the narrative drive of the novel with the perfect pitch of true poetry A darkly futuristic vision shot through with bolts of light Brilliant, poignant, disconcerting Adrian Hyland, author of Kinglake 350 and Diamond Dove This novel in verse, at once magical and irresistible, draws us in to a vivid future In Lisa Jacobson s telling, the Australian fascination with salt water and sea change is made over anew Romance holds hands with science and takes to the ocean Chris Wallace Crabbe, author of The Domestic Sublime and By and Large.

    One thought on “The Sunlit Zone”

    1. I wasn't expecting to much like this slim volume, but I somehow ended up loving it. It's got slowpocalypse, Aussie sense of place, beautiful (and sometimes heart-wrenching) description, genepunk, family drama, terrorism, sexuality, humour, even echoes of future-tech almost-selkieness - and all in verse. Nothing wraps up neatly, yet it feels satisfying. Little flaws here and there were not enough to knock it off a five-star rating for me. This isn't like anything else.

    2. When I first met Lisa Jacobson the strength of artistry within her almost overwhelmed her tiny frame. She held her head high and beamed out her poems with an assurance she didn’t always feel inside. Her initial self-published edition in A4 format included woodcuts and bold colours with the same distinct sharp edge of perception that she now displays in full maturity. It was a privilege to perform our simple poems for Peace in the international year of that name back in 1986, along with fellow [...]

    3. Told in verse along two converging timelines, The Sunlit Zone is a story of great intelligence and sensitivity about our not too distant future. Lisa Jacobson has combined thorough research and her powerful imagination to project our present concerns about technology and the environment into the mundane constraints of the next generation's everyday life. The Sunlit Zone explores the many layered depths of life-experience through the eyes of North, who could easily be my 12 year old daughter's fu [...]

    4. The Sunlit Zone by Lisa Jacobson is different to the books I normally read. It's written in verse. It's also much more literary than my usual fare, even when compared with the more literary books I've read recently, like the The Mad Scientist's Daughter. I admit I probably wouldn't have given it much of a second glance if not for the fact that after I tweeted in mock shock about a spec fic book* making the Stella longlist, Kerryn Goldsworthy (chair of the Stellar judging committee) tweeted at me [...]

    5. I am not a reader of poetry and I'm a failure at identifying metre, so I am not sure how this succeeds as a work in verse. It seems to me that each verse could easily have its line breaks removed and be read as a paragraph of prose. For me, then, the primary function of the verse form is to allow Jacobson to present a very spare, highly imagistic narrative, one which would be regarded as sleight, choppy, and perhaps even more experimental if it was made into a short story or novella.The text rea [...]

    6. The Sunlit Zone is a verse novel set in a future where environmental degradation and genetic experiments have destroyed the marine world as we currently know it. The narrator is North, whose twin (Finn) was born more sea child than human and who drowned while North was having her first adolescent petting session in the sand dunes with a friend Jack. The story swings between 2050, where we find North working as a marine biologist, and her earlier life with her family, her 'designer baby' friend C [...]

    7. This was a novel written in a form of prose where the language was easy to follow and a joy to read.Set 20-40 years time in Australia, the impact of technology and climate change is showing on the life of the planet. The book paints a believable and sad future scenario.The narrator looks back at her childhood, the loss of her twin sister, her first love and the future. She tells of the enviable changes to the sea and sea life and her struggles with basic human needs of love and being needed.

    8. What a wonderful little book. Recommended for fans of both speculative fiction and poetry - glad it's not just me that loves both these kinds of writing. Thought provoking ideas wrapped in beautiful imagery, and a moving personal story. Each sentence is a little world of its own. A quick ascent, a one-hour flight and down again. The bay in Brisbane shimmered like a piece of silk but underneath the water, houses huddled, drowned by rising sea levels. At the terminal we disembarked.

    9. An interesting combination of science fiction and poetry in this verse novel. Though I enjoyed the story, the poetry was often a little hard to handle, considering the theme and story. However, this is just a personal taste issue, and I recommend reading it yourself.

    10. A beautiful work of speculative fiction. I found the characterisations deeply satisfying. The poetic form of the book was rich in image and emotion. This book has haunted me for months since reading.

    11. This verse novel turned out better than I expected. The story line flowed well and I found myself caught up in North's experiences.

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