Miles Davis and American Culture

Miles Davis and American Culture Miles Davis and American Culture examines Davis in cultural context In this new collection of a dozen essays William Kenney explores the St Louis jazz scene of Davis s youth Eugene B Redmond looks at

  • Title: Miles Davis and American Culture
  • Author: Gerald Early Clark Terry
  • ISBN: 9781883982386
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • Miles Davis and American Culture examines Davis in cultural context In this new collection of a dozen essays, William Kenney explores the St Louis jazz scene of Davis s youth Eugene B Redmond looks at East St Louis s cultural history Ingrid Monson examines Davis and civil rights and Waldo Martin discusses Davis and his relation to the black avant garde of the 1960s.Miles Davis and American Culture examines Davis in cultural context In this new collection of a dozen essays, William Kenney explores the St Louis jazz scene of Davis s youth Eugene B Redmond looks at East St Louis s cultural history Ingrid Monson examines Davis and civil rights and Waldo Martin discusses Davis and his relation to the black avant garde of the 1960s.Original interviews and classic photographs round out the volume, published to coincide with the 2001 Miles Davis Festival, celebrating what would have been Davis s seventy fifth birthday.

    One thought on “Miles Davis and American Culture”

    1. Some of the essays in this collection shed new light on old controversies about Miles Davis, while others do nothing but rehash tired arguments about the music-- electric Miles vs. acoustic Miles, for example. Overall I found it a good read, admittedly because I'm a big Miles Davis fan.Particularly interesting was Martha Bayless' essay "Miles Davis and the Double Audience," an essay that provides a unique look at Miles' career long balancing act between his black audience, his white audience and [...]

    2. The title of this compilation is a little misleading, as it doesn't really focus specifically on Davis and his influence/connection to American culture. What this book does provide is a testament to the enigmatic nature of Davis. Thankfully, many contributors argue with the complexity of Davis' genius and his violence against women. There are also many interesting interviews with other musicians. The best part of the book, however, is the way it illuminates one of the most important aspects of c [...]

    3. Though it's occasionally marred by painfully academic examinations and endless repetitions of generally known facts, this set of new essays and interviews about jazz's so-called "Prince of Darkness" succeeds in helping even seasoned Miles-o-Philes see the trumpeter differently--a complex man even by usual artistic standards, I'm sure there's additional depths of the well to be tapped. It does pass my rule of thumb about music books: "Does it send you DIRECTLY to the subject's recordings?" Well, [...]

    4. Nice collection of essays, interviews, etc. on Miles Davis published by Missouri Historical Society for a Miles retrospective they had back in 2001. Interesting focus on his roots in St. Louis, including a brief history of pre-Miles St. Louis jazz by William Howland Kenney.

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