Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age

Hollywood Cartoons American Animation in Its Golden Age In Hollywood Cartoons Michael Barrier takes us on a glorious guided tour of American animation in the s s and s to meet the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs Bunny Bett

  • Title: Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age
  • Author: Michael Barrier
  • ISBN: 9780195167290
  • Page: 195
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Hollywood Cartoons, Michael Barrier takes us on a glorious guided tour of American animation in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, to meet the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey Mouse, Wile E Coyote, Donald Duck, Tom and Jerry, and many other cartoon favorites Beginning with black and white silent cartoons, Barrier offers an insightIn Hollywood Cartoons, Michael Barrier takes us on a glorious guided tour of American animation in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, to meet the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey Mouse, Wile E Coyote, Donald Duck, Tom and Jerry, and many other cartoon favorites Beginning with black and white silent cartoons, Barrier offers an insightful account, taking us inside early New York studios and such Hollywood giants as Disney, Warner Bros and MGM Barrier excels at illuminating the creative side of animation revealing how stories are put together, how animators develop a character, how technical innovations enhance the realism of cartoons Here too are colorful portraits of the giants of the field, from Walt and Roy Disney and their animators, to Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera Based on hundreds of interviews with veteran animators, Hollywood Cartoons gives us the definitive inside look at this colorful era and at the creative process behind these marvelous cartoons.

    One thought on “Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age”

    1. In 1969 Michael Barrier traveled to Los Angeles to record interviews with veterans of comics and animation. At the time, he was proprietor of Funnyworld, a mimeographed piece on comics that would soon be converted to a fully printed magazine devoted to comics and especially animation. "The idea," writes Barrier on his website, "was to publish the interviews in Funnyworld." On that first trip to Los Angeles, he managed to record interviews with Mel Blanc, Chuck Jones, Roger Armstrong, Ward Kimbal [...]

    2. Barrier's history of animation is detailed and revealing, even for those who already know a good deal of what he's talking about. As another reviewer pointed out, this book is best read in conjunction with Leonard Maltin's Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons; Revised and Updated (which you should read first), since Maltin's approach and style is extremely different from Barrier's. While Maltin focuses more on the history of different studio's overall changes, Barrier is mo [...]

    3. Boek over de ontwikkelingen in animatie tussen ca. 1930 en 1955. Barrier focust op animatie, dat wil zeggen, de techniek die tekeningen doet bewegen - andere zaken, als lay-out, story development, backgrounds, direction, of simpelweg de geschiedenis van studio's worden wel besproken, maar zijn duidelijk veel minder belangrijk.Dit geeft Barriers boek een hele andere focus dan die van Norman M. Kleins 'Seven Minutes: The Life and Death of the American Animated Cartoon', dat veel meer op vorm en on [...]

    4. I'm officially throwing in the towl on this one. It's been a month and I just can't get back into it. I'm gonna start following the words of Philip Roth, who said that if you haven't finished the book in two weeks then all is lost. I know the book is long but two weeks should be sufficient for a 600 page history and it wasn't.Hollywood Cartoons details the history of American animation from about the early 1910s to the early 1960s. It spends quite a bit of time with Disney, from the late 1920s t [...]

    5. This book looks at the history of animation from its early days up through the sixties, when cartoon studios were focusing more on television than on theatrical releases. There’s obviously a lot of attention paid to Disney, Warner Bros and MGM. The Fleischers and Paramount receive some coverage as well, and interestingly there’s also a chapter on UPA, a lesser-known studio responsible for Mister Magoo and Gerald McBoing-Boing. I was struck by how much seemed to be trial-and-error in the earl [...]

    6. Barrrier's book is an extremely well researched and well written look at American cartoon animation from the 30's to 50's. While, understandably, Disney gets the most attention, he does discuss the work produced by places such as Warner Bros, Terrytoons, Hanna-Barbera and UPA. That's really where the book flourishes. Seeing how ideas and techniques spread from studio to studio and being able to compare and contrast their different approaches is fascinating. Barrier doesn't pull punches. Nobody i [...]

    7. Michael Barrier has done wonders with providing us a book on the history of American animation. While it attempts to cover all the animation studios, most of it naturally covers the Disney studio (since they have the best track record for preserving their history than any other studio), there are some well covered section on Warner Bros, MGM, and UPA. Most of the information comes from first hand interviews, studio records, and other primary sources. Barrier has said that the finished book is on [...]

    8. This is pretty dry, but totally interesting and incredibly detailed. The content carries it even though the style does not. One gets a sense of the incredible tedium of producing something that to the viewer is a fast moving presentation. I am really enjoying this book on the history of cartoons and the people who created them.

    9. Thoroughly researched, exhaustively detailed, chock full of information never presented elsewhere, and yet Nowhere near as much fun to read as Leonard Maltin's "Of Mice and Magic." Barrier does not seem to love cartoons, and damns with faint praise nearly everything except the work of Bob Clampett.

    10. There's a lot, a lot of detail here. There was a lot of research.The problem is that the meat of the book is aesthetic judgments by the author of something that should really be shown and not just described. Barrier makes all kinds of conclusions about whether cartoons were artistically successful or not, which feels kind of ex cathedra without the examples.

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