Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty

Cheating Lessons Learning from Academic Dishonesty Nearly three quarters of college students cheat during their undergraduate careers a startling number attributed variously to the laziness of today s students their lack of a moral compass or the d

  • Title: Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty
  • Author: James M. Lang
  • ISBN: 9780674724631
  • Page: 345
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Nearly three quarters of college students cheat during their undergraduate careers, a startling number attributed variously to the laziness of today s students, their lack of a moral compass, or the demands of a hypercompetitive society For James Lang, cultural or sociological explanations like these are red herrings His provocative new research indicates that students oNearly three quarters of college students cheat during their undergraduate careers, a startling number attributed variously to the laziness of today s students, their lack of a moral compass, or the demands of a hypercompetitive society For James Lang, cultural or sociological explanations like these are red herrings His provocative new research indicates that students often cheat because their learning environments give them ample incentives to try and that strategies which make cheating less worthwhile also improve student learning Cheating Lessons is a practical guide to tackling academic dishonesty at its roots.Drawing on an array of findings from cognitive theory, Lang analyzes the specific, often hidden features of course design and daily classroom practice that create opportunities for cheating Courses that set the stakes of performance very high, that rely on single assessment mechanisms like multiple choice tests, that have arbitrary grading criteria these are the kinds of conditions that breed cheating Lang seeks to empower teachers to create effective learning environments that foster intrinsic motivation, promote mastery, and instill the sense of self efficacy that students need for deep learning.Although cheating is a persistent problem, the prognosis is not dire The good news is that strategies which reduce cheating also improve student performance overall Instructors who learn to curb academic dishonesty will have done than solve a course management problem they will have become better educators all around.

    One thought on “Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty”

    1. 371.58 LANMy review: cheating is the interesting topic, I pick up this book in order to know how to prevent my child and even myself from cheating. Author shifts from dispositional factors (e.g. gender) to contextual factors (e.g campus) to more focus on classroom environment. chap 9. On original work is most useful to me, it answer the question which always puzzle. , why do I need to produce my work when best answers are available. The most benefit of less cheating improve learning. Summary:5 f [...]

    2. Lang seeks to empower teachers to make concrete changes in their classrooms in order to reduce cheating. Too much of the discussion about cheating has focused on areas that are largely out of the control of the individual teachers leading to frustration and apathy in regards to cheating. Instead, Lang discusses 5 features of the classroom that, when addressed by the individual structure of the class, can reduce cheating in the classroom (emphasis on performance, high stake assessments, extrinsic [...]

    3. I read this book with a group of graduate students who were interested in the topic of academic integrity, so we had the opportunity to discuss much of the content as we went along.In general I found the book engaging and thought-provoking, and I was left with several new thoughts as to how to manage and design my own courses. In particular, the chapter on motivation should be widely read.The down sides of the book for me were three: it was often far too anecdotal in nature, the challenges of te [...]

    4. A nicely written book, as you would expect from an English professor.The first part was good, where the basic ways to prevent cheating were discussed. The answer seems to be, happily, that the best way to prevent cheating is to follow good teaching practices. Some exemplary teachers were showcased, which is always interesting. The second part, about the nuts and bolts of dealing with cheating cases, was not so good, as it listed some standard techniques the author, and others, have used. It migh [...]

    5. An incredible masterpiece of the history, research, and commentary on what some consider an epidemic in today's academia. If you are looking for a book to tell you how to deal with those nasty cheaters in your classroom, what punishments to dole out, how to make your course cheater-free, this isn't the book for you. Sure, Lang touches on those issues, but mostly this is a book about revitalizing your learning environment to engage students and make cheating less valuable to them. Well written an [...]

    6. Aside from a disappointing analysis of the moral exchange between professor and student, this was a helpful book. His primary thesis is that better teaching tends to reduce (though it cannot eliminate) cheating. Wise advice about institutional approaches to academic dishonesty, as well, although I'm a little puzzled by his association of honor codes with inflexible, harsh first responses to academic integrity violations. (The only institutions with honor codes I'm familiar with have exactly the [...]

    7. Required reading for a class. This book is about how to design a course, assignments, and a classroom atmosphere that inherently discourage cheating. Nowhere in this book does it remind you that you should teach your children to be honest and, for better or worse, to take pride in doing your own work. I tell you what, going to BYU did nothing to open my eyes to the dishonesty in this world. Not that I'm sorry, but other people just don't understand.

    8. Lang mines best practices and psychology research for strategies to make cheating less attractive to college students. These are things I hope that I'm already doing successfully--conveying that I genuinely think the material is important, providing multiple measures of learning, connecting the class to student realities.

    9. Lang has such a reasoned and smart take on this thorny issue, and all of the practical suggestions he has are spot on. Moreover, his writing is personal and a pleasure to read. I'd highly recommend this to anyone interested in higher ed and academic integrity.

    10. I greatly enjoyed Small Teaching so I read this book, too. I like its basic message: (1) prevention is the best medicine, and (2) practices that discourage teaching and good practices in general.

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