Hemingway's Chair

Hemingway s Chair Martin Sproale is an assistant postmaster obsessed with Ernest Hemingway Martin lives in a small English village where he studies his hero and putters about harmlessly until an ambitious outsider Ni

  • Title: Hemingway's Chair
  • Author: Michael Palin
  • ISBN: 0745179169
  • Page: 326
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Martin Sproale is an assistant postmaster obsessed with Ernest Hemingway Martin lives in a small English village, where he studies his hero and putters about harmlessly until an ambitious outsider, Nick Marshall, is appointed postmaster instead of Martin Slick and self assured, Nick steals Martin s girlfriend and decides to modernize the friendly local office by firingMartin Sproale is an assistant postmaster obsessed with Ernest Hemingway Martin lives in a small English village, where he studies his hero and putters about harmlessly until an ambitious outsider, Nick Marshall, is appointed postmaster instead of Martin Slick and self assured, Nick steals Martin s girlfriend and decides to modernize the friendly local office by firing dedicated but elderly employees and privatizing the business Suddenly, gentle Martin is faced with a choice meekly accept defeat as he always has, or fight for what he believes in, as his hero, Hemingway, would.Filled with Michael Palin s trademark wit and good humor, this novel is for anyone who has ever dreamed of triumphing over the technocrats and backstabbers of the world Hilarious, touching, and ultimately inspirational, Hemingway s Chair will make readers stand up and cheer.

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    1. spring 2013radio 4x1: 4 Extra Debut. Assistant postmaster Martin conceals a secret all-consuming passion for the words of Papa. Written and read by Michael Palin.2: Assistant postmaster Martin conceals a secret all-consuming passion for the words of Papa3: As pressure mounts at work, Martin finds himself being challenged in his private life, too4: Martin finds himself drawn more and more to Ruth, but Elaine has some curt words for him.5: Nick continues to make his clandestine plans for the Post [...]

    2. I really wanted to love this book. I am huge Michael Palin fan. When I look back at almost all of my favorite Python skits, he is almost always in them. I also enjoyed the first volume of his memoirs. But heree story started out well enough but things were not well flushed out meaning I wanted more background on some of the characters and, at times, things felt like they jumped around but it moved along smoothly for the first two acts. It was the third act which hurt the book in my view. The wra [...]

    3. Take one small English town, add pubs with much gossip, a seaside location, a tad of sex, a large helping of Hemingway, and an average man who wants to save the town's old post office. Give yourself an afternoon or two, dress your hot tea with a nip (or so) of your favorite addition, and enjoy! I kept waiting for Jane or Hercule or Hamish to appear, but alas, it's Hemingway's fishing chair that ultimately saves the day. A nice, comfortable read.

    4. Hemingway's Chair was the New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998. Ten years hence, I saw the book at a knocked-down price, and considering that I am a fan of New York Times' recommendations, the book moved through the sale, and on to my bedside table faster than Hemingway could write.Hilarious at times, the book has a dry British humor, a play on words, and oddly lovable characters. All except one. The hero of the book, the main character, Martin Sproale. Engaging at first, there is som [...]

    5. I've read this book about once a year since I bought it when it came out about 12 years ago. I consider it part of my Hemingway collection and keep it on my shelves with Papa's works. It is about a meek man finding his worth and his strength to live the life he always dreamed about. At first he studies Hemingway as a way to escape his terribly boring life as a postal worker in a small town in England. He gathers old items that are similar to what Papa used, like a typewriter that is almost like [...]

    6. This was neither a terrible book nor a great book, but somewhere right in the middle, and I'm totally okay with that. I picked it up because I was curious to know what former Python Michael Palin's fiction was like, and though there is definitely quite a bit of humor in it, "Hemingway's Chair" is not quite as zany or side-splittingly funny as some of Palin's Monty Python sketches. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though.Martin Sproale lives a dull life as assistant postmaster in the small, qu [...]

    7. Martin lives in a small English village where life ticks by without much happening. But change is inevitable and when new management comes to the post office where Martin works it seems that things will never be the same again. I love all of Michael Palin's work and this gentle book sees a 'little' man with a big obsession (Hemmingway) suddenly challenged to stand up for what it important to him. The book is an easy read, as easy as a comfy chair, but in martin's world the story is epic.

    8. Hemingway's Chair was the New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998. Ten years hence, I saw the book at a knocked-down price, and considering that I am a fan of New York Times' recommendations, the book moved through the sale, and on to my bedside table faster than Hemingway could write.Hilarious at times, the book has a dry British humor, a play on words, and oddly lovable characters. All except one. The hero of the book, the main character, Martin Sproale. Engaging at first, there is som [...]

    9. I really enjoyed this book. I must admit I did pick it up because of Palin being one of the founders of Monty Python. I also have always been intrigued by Hemingway. It took me a while to actually start it but once I did I was captured by the characters and their little town. A most enjoyable read - with a cup of tea in the garden.

    10. An enjoyable foray into a small town post office and it's changes when one manager leaves and a new and completely different one is assigned to take his place. Some pretty off-the-wall changes begin to shake up this close knit group, who prefer its family-friendly feel. Also central to the story is one employee's obsession with the importance of being the author Ernest Hemingway. Not wanting to give away just how these two points contribute to the story, I'll just say they're important and leave [...]

    11. HEMINGWAY'S CHAIR by Michael Palin is a 1998 book that is hard to get into but manages to steal you away in the second half. Martin Sproale has worked at the Theston post office for the past 16 years but now, just on the brink of a promotion to postmaster, he finds himself passed over in favor of an aggressive outsider. Martin is a pale man, interested in all things Hemingway, and has a slight passion for his co-worker, Elaine. But with the new manager, things change, and not for the better. Mod [...]

    12. This novel is one of those surprising pieces of fiction that when you start reading the story you assume you know where this is going; but you would be wrong. A small boring British town with a small boring man at the center of an unassuming story. This is a smart and feeling novel about a permanent wimp discovering he can channel his own macho bad ass Ernest Hemingway. There is a great host of support characters. You don't have to be a Ernest Hemingway fan to like this book, in fact the one Ame [...]

    13. Reading this book was like putting on a comfy sweater. One of those thick, woolen turtlenecks Hemingway wore. It was very natural and very comfortable (for both good and bad). Of course, Michael Palin is my favorite Python (or tied with the late Graham Chapman) and I've watched his travel programs and some of his memoirs before too, so it was likely that I was going to get around to reading his novel. Then when I learned it was about a mild mannered Mr. Pither-esque mailman who is obsessed with [...]

    14. It's taken just six and half years to get around to reading this. For some reason I kept putting it off when I went hunting in my stacks for the next bedtime book, but about a week or two ago I saw it and was interested enough to give it a go. I found it strangely absorbing. Strangely, because it is about a small town with people living small lives (including the principle character who, ironically, harbours a secret fascination with Ernest Hemmingway and with it a Hemmingway-like feeling of sup [...]

    15. Michael Palin can almost do no wrong, especially when it comes to comedy, acting, and travel writing; and in many ways this novel is a decent addition to his long and impressive resume, but it does not reach the level of enjoyment I have experienced from his other offerings. It is not bad by any measure, but just not as quirky or funny as I was expecting it to be, possibly an unfair expectation. I thought it would be more witty, but it is a nice domestic tale of obsession. He did an impressive b [...]

    16. Mild, entertaining, unchallenging. Read it for the multitude of Hemingway trivia bits. You have to have a feeling for the changing nature of the British Post Office to identify with the story otherwise. The characters were well-defined separate actors. It was easy to remember who was speaking or acting just by the words or actions themselves, something incredibly difficult to pull off. If you don't expect to have your socks blown off it's worth the effort.

    17. 3.5 out of 5 stars.Palin makes his readers fall in love with this community. Although the overall story isn't especially clever or imaginative, it's light and inviting and charmingly humourous. Be forewarned it does take a bit of a darker humoured turn toward the end. This book is best described as a comfort read. It's exactly perfect for a rainy afternoon, cozy under the covers with a hot cup of tea.

    18. Michael Palin's first novel is a real page-turner. A fictional story inspired by Hemingway's real-world triumphs and tragedies, as seen through the eyes of characters that this reader found relatable (though a tad one-dimensional at times). Still, thoroughly immersing and enjoyable - didn't want to put it down and couldn't wait to pick it up!

    19. Picked this one up in a dollar bin, since I had an infatuation with Hemingway from the time I devoured "A Farewell To Arms" in Junior High.The book was full of trivia on "Papa", and if your intent is to absorb obscure details for the next Trivia match at your local bar, well, you have found an excellent resource.

    20. Read this book years ago, when it first came out, and remember that I didn't like it QUITE as much as I had hoped. Decided to re-read -- and came to same conclusion. Good story, started out well, but just got weirder and kind of disappointing. But overall, would recommend. Michael Palin wrote another novel later on ("The Truth" in 2013) that I liked much, much better.

    21. Michael Palin is always good for an entertaining time and this novel certainly lives up to his past writings. Picked it up in an op shop and got a bargain in the deal.

    22. This was a charming story with quirky characters and an interesting plot. Michael Palin is a very nice writer!

    23. Neither good nor bad, just a simple tale told in Michael Palin's comfortable voice with his usual blend of wit and humanity. A nice light summer read sort of book.

    24. Badly written with too many adjectives and adverbs. If one has Hemingway's name in the title, they should at least avoid using so many unnecessary adjectives. Also, women are objectified in the book. This book is not worth my time.

    25. Engagingly written, but the experiment of having a protagonist with no personality of his own failed. The climax is pat and impossible to believe.

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