Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear

Down to the Crossroads Civil Rights Black Power and the Meredith March Against Fear In James Meredith became a civil rights hero when he enrolled as the first African American student at the University of Mississippi Four years later he would make the news again when he reente

  • Title: Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear
  • Author: Aram Goudsouzian
  • ISBN: 9780374192204
  • Page: 267
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1962, James Meredith became a civil rights hero when he enrolled as the first African American student at the University of Mississippi Four years later, he would make the news again when he reentered Mississippi, on foot His plan was to walk from Memphis to Jackson, leading a March Against Fear that would promote black voter registration and defy the entrenched racIn 1962, James Meredith became a civil rights hero when he enrolled as the first African American student at the University of Mississippi Four years later, he would make the news again when he reentered Mississippi, on foot His plan was to walk from Memphis to Jackson, leading a March Against Fear that would promote black voter registration and defy the entrenched racism of the region But on the march s second day, he was shot by a mysterious gunman, a moment captured in a harrowing and now iconic photograph What followed was one of the central dramas of the civil rights era With Meredith in the hospital, the leading figures of the civil rights movement flew to Mississippi to carry on his effort They quickly found themselves confronting southern law enforcement officials, local activists, and one another In the span of only three weeks, Martin Luther King, Jr narrowly escaped a vicious mob attack protesters were teargassed by state police Lyndon Johnson refused to intervene and the charismatic young activist Stokely Carmichael first led the chant that would define a new kind of civil rights movement Black Power Aram Goudsouzian s Down to the Crossroads is the story of the last great march of the King era, and the first great showdown of the turbulent years that followed Depicting rural demonstrators courage and the impassioned debates among movement leaders, Goudsouzian reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire even bolder protests against it Full of drama and contemporary resonances, this book is civil rights history at its best.

    One thought on “Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear”

    1. This book has my first 2 requirements. It is short (262 pages) and readable. It tells of the Meredith March against fear going from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi in 1962. Covering the role of all black leaders involves including the iconic James Meredith who is described as a loner, who continues to go his own way. The acerbic Stokely Carmichael and the thoughtful Martin Luther King also receive a great deal of space. The brutality the marchers enduredis described including the attempted murde [...]

    2. A fascinating portrait of the next year after Selma. Politics, Vietnam, and the burgeoning tremors of black power are all woven into this tale of James Meredith's march in Mississippi. It begins with him, but after being shot, many leaders of the disparate civil rights groups try to come together to continue it.

    3. I'd actually give the book a 3.5 - 3.7. I'm a stickler for non-fiction books. If they read like op-eds I have a hard time stomaching them. Give me the facts. So I give this book some of the highest praise possible by saying it is incredibly balanced and does a great job of discussing all the sides of a pivotal time in U.S. history.This book is very well researched and informative. It however reads like a research paper and can be hard to keep track of the various people/flow of events. The meand [...]

    4. This march was just a small part of the Civil Rights movement, but many of the main characters of that time participated. The author was able to pull together all of their stories into what felt like a cohesive overview of the history of that era. It was a good start to my reading for my trip through the South.

    5. Well-written piece of history about the civil rights movement with which I wasn't very familiar. On reading the book I learned that perhaps part of the reason for my ignorance was the fact the Commercial Appeal chose not to cover the march, apparently in the continuing hope that the "civil rights mess" would just go away.

    6. "Research and interviews on the events and personalities involved in the Meredith March provides a deeper look into the stories of the locals involved in the movement." Read more here.

    7. Clearly written history of a march that has not received much attention. Details, without prejudice, a hinge point in the civil rights movement. Especially relevant in light of the appalling racial developments of the spring of 2015.

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