She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

She Who Tells a Story Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World She Who Tells a Story introduces the pioneering work of leading women photographers from Iran and the Arab world Jananne Al Ani Boushra Almutawakel Gohar Dashti Rana El Nemr Lalla Essaydi Shad

  • Title: She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World
  • Author: Kristen Gresh
  • ISBN: 9780878468041
  • Page: 193
  • Format: Hardcover
  • She Who Tells a Story introduces the pioneering work of 12 leading women photographers from Iran and the Arab world Jananne Al Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat and Newsha Tavakolian As the Middle East has undergone unparalleled change over the She Who Tells a Story introduces the pioneering work of 12 leading women photographers from Iran and the Arab world Jananne Al Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat and Newsha Tavakolian As the Middle East has undergone unparalleled change over the past 20 years, and national and personal identities have been dismantled and rebuilt, these artists have tackled the very notion of representation with passion and power Their provocative images, which range in style from photojournalism to staged and manipulated visions, explore themes of gender stereotypes, war and peace, and personal life, all the while confronting nostalgic Western notions about women of the Orient and exploring the complex political and social landscapes of their home regions Enhanced with biographical and interpretive essays, and including than 100 stunning reproductions, this book challenges us to set aside preconceptions about this part of the world and share in the vision of a group of vibrant artists as they claim the right to tell their own stories in images of great sophistication, expressiveness and beauty.

    One thought on “She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World”

    1. Saw this at the Women's Museum of Art in DC. Wonderful and thought provoking. Photos in the book include "Mother, Daughter, Doll" series and "Bullets Revisited #3".

    2. I saw this exhibition when it came to the CMOA and I haven't stopped thinking about it since, so the book seemed necessary to my continuing processing of these artists and their amazing art. The book provides some grounding context, but as before, I get lost in the images. I am not usually particularly moved by photography as an art form, but every single one of these women is an artist of the highest caliber with voices we desperately need in these divided times.

    3. I saw this exhibit at the MFA in Boston and I was so moved that I needed to have the book to spend more time with the photos. There's a broad range of styles and issues represented in this collection, and I found it humanizing, eye opening, and profound. It definitely helped me gain new perspectives on many issues all over the Middle East.

    4. These powerful images and concepts prove we need to see more of these women and with more frequency. The text is good for context, but I do wish I could see more of the artists' work. Some particular faves: Boushra Almutawakel, Rania Matar, Shadi Ghadirian, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, and Nermine Hammam.

    5. "When they keep you from breathing through your nose, you open your mouth to breathe." Newsha TavakolianThis collection of photographs needs to be about 500 pages longer. It's more of an introductory sample to the quality of work being created today by amazing women from the Arab World. Some photographs are described without being included in the book. There's a consistent theme of juxtaposing home-life with the political, religious, and war surrounding their subjects. Many pieces specifically a [...]

    6. I was engrossed by the pictures and the descriptions for the photography in this book. Twelve photographers from Iran and Arab world capture innocence, oppression. My heart beat hopefully for the woman on the swing while my mind grappled with seeing portraits of six Iranian singers "who are forbidden, as women, by Islamic tenets to perform by themselves in public or to produce recordings." (p.70)

    7. Very interesting photography. Unsurprisingly I liked some more than others, but it's good to see this selection of different photographers' work. The biographical texts are pretty useful, but some of the commentary is annoying -- for example, one of the essays notes that "the majority of participants in this exhibition do not wish to be categorized as women photographers", but that's how they're presented here regardless. I'd rather have more effort to consistently see them in their own terms.

    8. Maybe a bit too much text? And not enough photos? But context is necessary, so Book should have been longer :-)

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