A Tour of C++

A Tour of C The C standard allows programmers to express ideas clearly simply and directly and to write faster efficient code Bjarne Stroustrup the designer and original implementer of C thoroughly cove

  • Title: A Tour of C++
  • Author: Bjarne Stroustrup
  • ISBN: 9780321958310
  • Page: 499
  • Format: Paperback
  • The C 11 standard allows programmers to express ideas clearly, simply, and directly, and to write faster, efficient code Bjarne Stroustrup, the designer and original implementer of C , thoroughly covers the details of this language and its use in his definitive reference, The C Programming Language, Fourth Edition In A Tour of C , Stroustrup excerpts theThe C 11 standard allows programmers to express ideas clearly, simply, and directly, and to write faster, efficient code Bjarne Stroustrup, the designer and original implementer of C , thoroughly covers the details of this language and its use in his definitive reference, The C Programming Language, Fourth Edition In A Tour of C , Stroustrup excerpts the overview chapters from that complete reference, expanding and enhancing them to give an experienced programmer in just a few hours a clear idea of what constitutes modern C In this concise, self contained guide, Stroustrup covers most major language features and the major standard library components not, of course, in great depth, but to a level that gives programmers a meaningful overview of the language, some key examples, and practical help in getting started Stroustrup presents the C features in the context of the programming styles they support, such as object oriented and generic programming His tour is remarkably comprehensive Coverage begins with the basics, then ranges widely through advanced topics, including many that are new in C 11, such as move semantics, uniform initialization, lambda expressions, improved containers, random numbers, and concurrency The tour ends with a discussion of the design and evolution of C and the extensions added for C 11 This guide does not aim to teach you how to program see Stroustrup s Programming Principles and Practice Using C for that nor will it be the only resource you ll need for C mastery see Stroustrup s The C Programming Language, Fourth Edition, for that If, however, you are a C or C programmer wanting greater familiarity with the current C language, or a programmer versed in another language wishing to gain an accurate picture of the nature and benefits of modern C , you can t find a shorter or simpler introduction than this tour provides.

    One thought on “A Tour of C++”

    1. I haven't read a book about C++ in a long time because I mean I learned it in college and then I used it for work for so long that I figured I knew all about it and I didn't need to read a C++ book right? Well, this one is pretty short and it's written by the guy who invented C++ so I decided to give it a shot. It turns out it was pretty interesting. They came out with a new version of C++ in 2011 and they added some new keywords and features, so that was good to read about. Also, I never really [...]

    2. Given that I've programmed in C++ before this book was perfect for me as a re-introduction.It doesn't really explain things in depths, but it is rather just a very quick tour of the features. Perfect for someone who's an experienced programmer and has done some low level programming, but not very useful for beginners I'm afraid. Still I'd recommend reading this, if nothing it servers as a good motivational text to keep learning more.

    3. I recently started working on my first major professional C++ project, and this is the best introductory book for the experienced programmer I have found. I plan to follow it up with Effective Modern C++, then the big one, Stroustrup's The C++ Programming Language 4th Ed. This is a great short overview from the person who invented the language. Strongly recommended, and notably clearer and more concise than most other programming books I've read.

    4. If you have no programming experience, this book won't teach it to you (read Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ instead).If you want to learn about every detail of C++, this book won't give it to you (read The C++ Programming Language instead).If, however, you come from another language and want to get an overview of what's possible in modern C++, or if you're an experienced C++ programmer and want to know what's new in C++11, this is the book for you. Concise and following a "less i [...]

    5. This is pretty good high level overview of C++. The author demonstrates the basic functions of the language and points the reader to his more detailed books for more information. I plan to keep this book handy, just as a quick reference.

    6. It is a good way to get a short overview of the latest standard(C++11). There is not many details, but just enough to see the possibilities of the language.

    7. I haven't looked at C++ for a few years. This book serves well for quickly getting my mindset into C++ programming.

    8. This is a decent introductory book written by the language's creator himself. It is a good book, but by golly, how can you make SO MANY MISTAKES in such a short book? Stroustrup has a hefty errata page on his website, and it's not even complete.The book is extremely concise. Sometimes the author manages to convey the condensed design choices and concepts very well, sometimes it leaves the reader scratching their head and googling the same concepts for more information on the topic.While I do bel [...]

    9. Stroustrup gives a reasonable overview of C++ in this book. I can't take points off for not taking a long time explaining each concept, since there are other books with that job, including his own. But I did have some trouble with it. In particular, the examples left a lot to be desired - he would frequently use variables like "f", rather than something clearer. Indeed, in a particularly bad case, he has both "f" and "F" as variables (one is a function, the other is a function object).Still, it' [...]

    10. Good intro to C++. The book is very succinct and Bjarne kinda rushes through everything. It's very hard to read this book by itself without prior knowledge of C++ basics at least. Concepts of pointers and references are explained well, although not in too much depth. Constants and inheritance is handled well. Also felt like the book (which is actually an inflated chapter from his other book) is more of a money-making machine than a tool that beginners really need. Not worth the full price, but a [...]

    11. My previous review (written a day earlier) was not fair. Thinking about what I wrote, my prior familiarity with a number of features introduced in C++11 caused me to incorrectly state that the features were not covered in sufficient detail. So, I’m revising my rating to 4 stars and my recommendation is that this book is sufficient to get you started writing modern C++ code that uses most of the significant new features of C++11 and with appropriate pointers to corresponding chapters in Stroust [...]

    12. A good book to get you started with C++. Easy to digest. As a beginner in Object Oriented Programming, I was able to quickly grasp the concepts by following the instructions in the book.

    13. I would describe myself as a casual programmer. I learned C/C++ in school (the difference was never that clear to me) and use them today as means to various ends, without worrying too much about the art of programming itself.I read this book because I was feeling a bit guilty for abusing C++ like this, so I wanted to read at least one such book cover-to-cover. So you'll understand why Stroustrup's metaphor for this book as a map rings true to me. I got the same impression as when seeing a map of [...]

    14. To me, much better than his "other book", as it is a tour and not a cartographic expedition like the "other book".

    15. C++ 11 and later clearly include all the interesting language features that we've been enjoying in other languages such as Python, Scala, and JavaScript. Examples would be futures, promises, lambdas, unicode, variadic arguments, and regexes. It's a good whet-your-appetite book. I am not particularly fond of the author's writing style, be it English or CPP. Some of the parts (e.g. function adapters, type functions etc. might be too involved for beginners to understand. Overall a good starter if y [...]

    16. Excellent overview of the C++ programming language. Oddly, although it is compiled and has little runtime flexibility, through templates it can achieve higher levels of abstraction than the highly reflective vm languages (C# and Java come to mind). Highly recommended. Now the only problem I have is what to build with it, since it's almost always faster to write code in java/javascript, largely due to the large amount of information those languages keep around at runtime, which eases debugging an [...]

    17. As I was reading it, everything made sense. I coded some of the examples in the text along the way. Yet, upon finishing, I found myself having to google or flip through the book excessively in order to make a complete program. This is, perhaps, what a tour should be: it sums up individual components of the language well, but I found myself still lacking a fundamental and functional basis for understanding C++ after finishing it.

    18. Very terse, and I often had to find more information on and/or Stack Overflow; but that was a stated objective of the book and is a feature rather than a bug, so that he could get the key concepts across. What was a problem is that many of these programs had minor errors when I tried to implement them; and further, it just wasn't as tight of a buildup from first principles as K&R (or, really, even close). Standard library descriptions were solid.

    19. Really good book, serves as a very nice introduction to C++11 (language and standard library). Awesome to get a short and concise update on new features of C++11 and also to refresh your memory on C++ syntax and stdlib.Recommended to take a look at this one before tackling it's big brother ( The C++ Programming Language ;).

    20. A must read if you want a brief introduction to the language or you want to reacquaint yourself with all the new features up to C++11. Imposible to absorb all the information on a first read but a good book to have by your side. Specially useful are the advice provided at the end of each chapter and how each chapter corresponds to one or several of "The C++ Programming Language" (2013 version).

    21. This was an excellent C++ refresher and introductory guide to the new C++11 features. However, it does not spend much time on the basics or treat any subjects in great depth. For these reasons, I cannot recommend this book for a first exposure to C++.

    22. Good overview of C++. Not a criticism of the book (and it didn't affect my rating), but the formatting of code examples in the Kindle edition that I read was incredibly poor and made reading tedious. I was shocked that an electronic book could be such a poor substitute for paper.

    23. A short introduction to the C++ language for experienced programmers by the creator of C++. While it won't make you a master C++ programmer, it provides, in a short time, the necessary familiarity to read other C++ books.

    24. Very well written and easy to understand. A great resource for anyone looking to update their knowledge of c++.

    25. If you see this book described as the C++ equivalent of The C Programming Language by Kernighan and Ritchie, don't believe it. This book is much less accessible.

    26. Uma boa revisão da linguagem. Embora aborde os tópicos de forma superficial, usando como um guia rápido é excelente.

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