Theory of Colours

Theory of Colours By the time Goethe s Theory of Colours appeared in the wavelength theory of light and color had been firmly established To Goethe the theory was the result of mistaking an incidental result for

  • Title: Theory of Colours
  • Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Deane B. Judd
  • ISBN: 9780262570213
  • Page: 173
  • Format: Paperback
  • By the time Goethe s Theory of Colours appeared in 1810, the wavelength theory of light and color had been firmly established To Goethe, the theory was the result of mistaking an incidental result for an elemental principle Far from pretending to a knowledge of physics, he insisted that such knowledge was an actual hindrance to understanding He based his conclusions eBy the time Goethe s Theory of Colours appeared in 1810, the wavelength theory of light and color had been firmly established To Goethe, the theory was the result of mistaking an incidental result for an elemental principle Far from pretending to a knowledge of physics, he insisted that such knowledge was an actual hindrance to understanding He based his conclusions exclusively upon exhaustive personal observation of the phenomena of color.Of his own theory, Goethe was supremely confident From the philosopher, we believe we merit thanks for having traced the phenomena of colours to their first sources, to the circumstances under which they appear and are, and beyond which no further explanation respecting them is possible Goethe s scientific conclusions have, of course, long since been thoroughly demolished, but the intelligent reader of today may enjoy this work on quite different grounds for the beauty and sweep of his conjectures regarding the connection between color and philosophical ideas for an insight into early nineteenth century beliefs and modes of thought and for the flavor of life in Europe just after the American and French Revolutions.The work may also be read as an accurate guide to the study of color phenomena Goethe s conclusions have been repudiated, but no one quarrels with his reporting of the facts to be observed With simple objects vessels, prisms, lenses, and the like the reader will be led through a demonstration course not only in subjectively produced colors, but also in the observable physical phenomena of color By closely following Goethe s explanations of the color phenomena, the reader may become so divorced from the wavelength theory Goethe never even mentions it that he may begin to think about color theory relatively unhampered by prejudice, ancient or modern.

    One thought on “Theory of Colours”

    1. I decided to rate this book as if I had read it when it was first published. A few decades before Darwin published 'The Origin of Species', Goethe wrote this book without being a scientist in the strict sense of the word. Since then there have been many advances made in Optics and Physics to explain the phenomena that Goethe describes better but one can only admire and acknowledge the extraordinary amount of work that went into this book. It contains a little bit of everything for everyone altho [...]

    2. Goethe plays a game of marbles with his eyeballs. You can join him, but you have to play by his rules; and they won't always be fair. I wasn't able to follow along with most of the demonstrations because I didn't have prisms, colored glass and candles handy this book should really come with a little lab kit.

    3. archive/details/goethesthEnd of introduction: "In looking a little further round us, we are not without fears that we may fail to satisfy another class of scientific men. By an extraordinary combination of circumstances the theory of colours has been drawn into the province and before the tribunal of the mathematician, a tribunal to which it cannot be said to be amenable. This was owing to its affinity with the other laws of vision which the mathematician was legitimately called upon to treat. I [...]

    4. recommended by a bearded and bespectacled youth with a studious aspect on the sf muni (or was it boston? I think it was sf)

    5. O que me fez interessar por obra tão desconhecida de Goethe, foi certa vez ter ouvido na aula de Cosmologia e Astrologia Medieval do prof. Luiz Gonzaga de Carvalho Neto (Gugu) que, do ponto de vista simbólico, as cores primárias (vermelho, amarelo e azul) e as secundárias (verde, laranja e roxo) representam as etapas pelas quais passam os estados de consciência do ser humano. É um movimento descendente-ascendente que parte da consciência do ser de que não tem a posse daquilo que deseja ( [...]

    6. I was curious about this book because I've come across mention of it numerous times, usually in reference to its influence on the work of impressionist painters. Published in 1810 (first English translation 1840), it was surprisingly easy to understand. I did get a bit bogged down with all of the experiments because I didn't try them myself, only imagined their results as Goethe described them - they involved setting up coloured disks on different coloured backgrounds in specific lighting condit [...]

    7. since 1982 the color theory of goethe had my attention. but science took me on a direction that gave little chance to meet again. untill some 30y later i found myself staring at an aquaduct in spoleto (i). the same goethe had seen during his journey in italy. from then my attention once again to the color theory became afresh. and it is the best thing i've encountered about light and color so far.

    8. I read this book twice, first when I started researching Color Theory last year, and again just this month. I got a lot more out of this the second time around, realizing that Goethe is responsible for several key established ideas about color repeated by many other artists and color theorists through modern times. A good read for anyone really interested in the history of Color Theory and art.

    9. I probably would have liked it more if I was actually interested in that sort of thing and I wasn't reading it for a Uni assignment It also would have helped if it actually had the information I needed in it :(

    10. Some drags on but some is very readable. Would have been fantastic in its own context. Still worth a look.

    11. More fascinating that you would expect, simply because he points out many of the things that we take for granted about how we see color and light.

    12. Learn what Goethe saw in the 1800s - and live it all over again. Color by color. Whether you're an artist or an admirer of the arts, this is a classic.

    13. Of course this compliments Liane Collot d'Herbois and is basically essential groundwork understanding, foundation for the paint-therapy work, but really quite interesting for anyone.Enjoy-

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