The Self-Portrait: A Cultural History

The Self Portrait A Cultural History This broad cultural history of self portraiture brilliantly maps the history of the genre from the earliest myths of Narcissus and the Christian tradition of bearing witness to the prolific self imag

  • Title: The Self-Portrait: A Cultural History
  • Author: JamesHall
  • ISBN: 9780500239100
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This broad cultural history of self portraiture brilliantly maps the history of the genre, from the earliest myths of Narcissus and the Christian tradition of bearing witness to the prolific self image making of today s contemporary artists Focusing on a perennially popular subject, the book tells the vivid history of works that offer insights into artists personal, psThis broad cultural history of self portraiture brilliantly maps the history of the genre, from the earliest myths of Narcissus and the Christian tradition of bearing witness to the prolific self image making of today s contemporary artists Focusing on a perennially popular subject, the book tells the vivid history of works that offer insights into artists personal, psychological, and creative worlds Topics include the importance of the medieval mirror craze in early self portraiture the confessional self portraits of Titian and Michelangelo the mystique of the artist s studio, from Vermeer to Velazquez the role of biography and geography for serial self portraitists such as Courbet and Van Gogh the multiple selves of modern and contemporary artists such as Cahun and Sherman and recent developments in the era of globalization Comprehensive and beautifully illustrated, the book features the work of a wide range of artists including Beckmann, Caravaggio, Durer, Gentileschi, Ghiberti, Giotto, Goya, Kahlo, Kauffman, Magritte, Mantegna, Picasso, Poussin, Raphael, Rembrandt and Van Eyck The full range of the subject is explored, including comic and caricature self portraits, invented or imaginary self portraits, and important collections of self portraiture such as that of the Medici.

    One thought on “The Self-Portrait: A Cultural History”

    1. I thought you would like to see my Self-Portrait. You will have to concede that it is more revealing than my ordinary avatar, for it displays my soul. For not only are my appearances presented but that much more elusive and private aspect: the image I have of myself. Yes, I am very proud of that blue, and wish to enhance it, in case you had not noticed it. The somewhat different angle, orientation and the inversion will unfurl a distinctive essence that I hope will inebriate you. My self made im [...]

    2. I can't say I fully enjoyed the book. Or probably it is just my expectations. When I bought the book I was waiting something with stories about painters and their self portraits, probably more fictional plot. But the book was a bit more of academical content. There were passages I was fast-reading for the sake of finishing. To be fair, it is quite informative, beautifully illustrated, I could find some of the stories I was looking for. But it was not quite qualifying to 5stars.

    3. Before I start this review, I should disclose that I won this book from a giveaway hosted on . This in no way altered my opinion of this book and my review will be written as if I had bought this book. I may have mentioned it before, but I figured I should say it again, I got my bachelor’s degree in art history. So, you can imagine my excitement when I was notified that I won a book all about self-portraits! It has been a few months since I had read a scholarly based art history book, so I was [...]

    4. I liked 75% of this book. More to do with my dislike of art post-19th Century than the book's fault.The idea of history traced through self-portraits really intrigued my interest in both history and art history. By using self-portraits, and the lack of self-portraits, it is able to capture how the Artist is perceived within society, as well as how the Artist themselves view what they are doing and the purposes for their Art.The main takeout is that self portraiture is highly linked to the identi [...]

    5. I received this book compliments of Thames & Hudson through the First Reads program.The artist's place in, and meaning to, society has changed throughout history and the same is true of self-portraits. James Hall surveys the changes from the Middle Ages to the present day. His structure is to examine ten themes that fall fairly well into a chronological order. This works nicely and helps make sense of the give and take between the artist and his time (and patrons). Each chapter illustrates [...]

    6. I enjoyed it. It's about artists' self portraits. What more can I say? It has a noticeably anglocentric bias when dealing with the 18th century, it has a tendency to make statements about conceptual aspects of the works without explanation of how these might apply or came about. The book steamrolls through modern art, with the final page including a new artist, only to give him a single paragraph. Art is all about context, history, presence and the sense of self. That's a lot for a book like thi [...]

    7. Well-Illustrated, informative, and enjoyable. It covers a huge amount of ground in an intelligent style which contextualises the art without overdoing the background at the expense of the pieces he discusses.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *