Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons

Think Like a Commoner A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons The biggest tragedy of the commons is the misconception that commons are failures relics from another era rendered unnecessary by the market and state Think Like a Commoner dispels such prejudices by

  • Title: Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons
  • Author: David Bollier
  • ISBN: 9780865717688
  • Page: 407
  • Format: Paperback
  • The biggest tragedy of the commons is the misconception that commons are failures relics from another era rendered unnecessary by the market and state Think Like a Commoner dispels such prejudices by explaining the rich history and promising future of the commons an ageless paradigm of cooperation and fairness that is re making our world.With graceful prose and dozens oThe biggest tragedy of the commons is the misconception that commons are failures relics from another era rendered unnecessary by the market and state Think Like a Commoner dispels such prejudices by explaining the rich history and promising future of the commons an ageless paradigm of cooperation and fairness that is re making our world.With graceful prose and dozens of fascinating stories, David Bollier describes the quiet revolution that is pioneering practical forms of self governance and production controlled by people themselves Think Like a Commoner explains how the commons Is an exploding field of DIY innovation ranging from and seed sharing to community forests, collaborative consumption, and beyond Challenges the standard narrative of market economics by explaining how cooperation generates significant value and human fulfillment Provides a framework of law and social action that can help us move beyond the pathologies of neoliberal capitalismWe have a choice ignore the commons and suffer the ongoing private plunder of our common wealth, or Think Like a Commoner and learn how to rebuild our society and reclaim our shared inheritance This accessible, comprehensive introduction to the commons will surprise and enlighten you, and provoke you to action.David Bollier is an author, activist, blogger, and independent scholar He is the author of six books on different aspects of the commons, including Green Governance, The Wealth of the Commons, and Viral Spiral, and is a frequent speaker at conferences, colleges and universities, and policy workshops.

    One thought on “Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons”

    1. Εξαιρετικά ενδιαφέρουσα εισαγωγή στην έννοια των "κοινών", της συν-διαχείρησης των κοινών αγαθών του κόσμου. Κατανοητό, ενδιαφέρον, με παραδείγματα και εύστοχες ιστορίες. Πολύ καλή η ελληνική έκδοση.

    2. Are the commons big, or just vanishing?[Through my ratings, reviews and edits I'm providing intellectual property and labor to Inc listed on Nasdaq, which fully owns and in 2013 posted revenues for $74 billion and $274 million profits. Intellectual property and labor require compensation. Inc. is also requested to provide assurance that its employees and contractors' work conditions meet the highest health and safety standards at all the company's sites.] The latter, is the book's answer. And [...]

    3. The idea I liked the most in this book was a new triumvirate requiring checks and balances -- the corporate, the government and the commons. A combination of the commons with the government is the proper check against corporate greed, corruption and even simply the corporate mandate for profit. Simply thinking in terms of a commons, changes the outlook on political issues and grass roots efforts. Our law has a long history of following the commons (common law) and maybe the common law needs to b [...]

    4. Anecdotal in nature, Bollier's "Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons" is a useful text to get a grounding in the theoretical and real-life application of the "commons". Bollier provides a thoughtful and compelling antidote to the well-worn narrative of contemporary neo-liberal market ideology; homo economicus is anything but rational in this text. While the writing feels a bit like an extra-long essay at times, the engaging nature of the various ways to implemen [...]

    5. Δεν ξέρω αν μπορώ να βάλω "αστεράκια" σε ένα τέτοιο βιβλίο. Είναι ενδιαφέρον, εξηγεί τι ακριβώς είναι "τα κοινά", με παραδείγματα από την ιστορία και το σήμερα, και πώς αυτά θα μπορούσαν ίσως να λειτουργήσουν για να περάσουμε σε μια άλλη μορφή κοινωνίας. Μερικά απ' αυτά που λέε [...]

    6. Bollier reveals how the corporate world has been encroaching and usurping the resources that were once held in Common by the citizens of Earth. If you want to know how international corporations operate, this is a good book for you. Also, he gives us hope by showing how ordinary people are resisting these efforts by creating new commons. A very good read.

    7. Best overview of the commons and commoners that I've read. Bollier offers a welcoming introduction and exploration of many historical and contemporary commons, making a compelling case that the commons might hold answers for the future of political, economic, and social life in the 21st century. Recommended for all.

    8. I heard Bollier speak at an Open Ed conference this past year (2017) in Anaheim CA. A great talk and the book did not disappoint. It is a daring seemingly new, yet as Bollier argues, a very old vision of how society can be managed through lateral relationships rather than hierarchical governmental and business models solely focused on power and profit. A key concept I intuitively understood but had never named: enclosures. In his chapter Enclosures of Nature, he outlines the grand illusion, "one [...]

    9. A refreshing way of looking at economics from a non-capitalist perspective. The author overstates the potential for commons as an alternative to capitalism and also overstates its benefits in certain instances, but there is a place for a larger role that commons can play in our lives.

    10. LightweightToo repetitive. It feels like a unnecessarily long blog post.Really, the most useful part are the charts at the end.

    11. I'm going to have to read it again. I raced through it and its been tickling my brain ever since. But a book I want to share so that I can talk to someone about it

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