101 Things You Don't Know About Science and No One Else Does Either

Things You Don t Know About Science and No One Else Does Either James Trefil takes the reader on a thrilling tour across the borders of current scientific knowledge from astronomy to genetics from information technology to cosmology the great contested questions

  • Title: 101 Things You Don't Know About Science and No One Else Does Either
  • Author: James S. Trefil
  • ISBN: 9780395877401
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Paperback
  • James Trefil takes the reader on a thrilling tour across the borders of current scientific knowledge from astronomy to genetics, from information technology to cosmology, the great contested questions that preoccupy researchers today and will become headlines tomorrow In elegant, witty three page summations, Dr Trefil makes sense of science for the rest of us WashingtJames Trefil takes the reader on a thrilling tour across the borders of current scientific knowledge from astronomy to genetics, from information technology to cosmology, the great contested questions that preoccupy researchers today and will become headlines tomorrow In elegant, witty three page summations, Dr Trefil makes sense of science for the rest of us Washington Post.

    One thought on “101 Things You Don't Know About Science and No One Else Does Either”

    1. As a mechanical engineer I wasn't impressed by this book. The author limits himself to three pages on each 'thing you don't know.' This prevents any in-depth analysis on some things, and stretching to fill three pages on others. This seems a poor choice to me, but it prevents it from being an overly technical book, thus a good choice for those without a strong technical/science background. References to further reading are presented in the appendix; I like that. However the author's editorializi [...]

    2. No other book I have read outlines so many of our current open thoughts on science. The work is described in terms that we all can understand and relate to - something science literacy needs to do a better job on.

    3. This book is really for people who don't know much at all about science -- there wasn't much in here I didn't already know.

    4. Numbers are accumulating to consummate the whole Universe but how about a tiniest atom like neutrino without a mass and chargeless be hurled into the void of numbers? Like so many thigs are consisted of numbers, including The Universe itself and the lives inside it.DNA is a product of numbers and it is twisting according to the rule of dimension which in turn, is also made up of ruling entites of numbers. The numbering of winding and unwinding of DNA is manipulated by the rule of the dimensional [...]

    5. I've had this book since it was first published in the 1990's and only just now decided to read it. Reading about predictions of the direction different fields in the natural and computer sciences would take was really enlightening and amusing almost 20 years after the fact. It would be interesting to have an updated version of what the author "got right" and what was way off. Because this book is out of date at this point, I wouldn't really recommend it unless someone has an interest in science [...]

    6. Took awhile to get through this one; thankfully the author kept each vignette short. I felt like a moron, though; even though Trefil was obviously dumbing down the material. It was also a little outdated, which had the added benefit of making me feel a teensy bit smarter.If you like black holes, dark matter, or quarks you may like this one better than I did. For me, it was just meh.

    7. At least, most of it was read in the bathroom. Sometimes an interesting part grabbed me and I took it with me.It's fun to read slightly outdated science like this because it puts you at less of a disadvantage.

    8. Much of science has developed since this book was published. An okay piece touching upon its (science) different areas.

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