Somme Mud

Somme Mud It s the end of the winter and the conditions are almost unbelievable We live in a world of Somme mud We sleep in it work in it fight in it wade in it and many of us die in it We see it feel

Battle of the Somme The Battle of the Somme French Bataille de la Somme German Schlacht an der Somme , also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British Empire and French Third Republic against the German Empire.It took place between July and November on both sides of the upper reaches of the River Somme in France. The Somme Battlefields of WW, France Great War The battlefields of the Somme are located in the beautiful, rural landscape of the region of Picardy and the Dpartement de la Somme. Somme David Doughty Australian Stories Tribute To ANZACs The Battle of the Somme was one of the bloodiest battles in World War I and human history The Allied forces, including England, France, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa, took on the German lines in the northern part of France. BBC iWonder The Battle of the Somme days of horror The Battle of the Somme, fought in northern France, was one of the bloodiest of World War One For five months the British and French armies fought the Germans in a brutal battle of attrition on a The Somme Cassell Military Paperbacks Peter Hart The Somme Cassell Military Paperbacks Peter Hart on FREE shipping on qualifying offers The Somme these words conjure the image of war rigidly fought by traditional means even when catastrophe clearly loomed Relying on personal testimonies never before published Reasons Why the Battle of the Somme is Regarded as Such a A Short Note On The Battle Of Somme Essay SSG Bolden, Gene L SSG Joiner, Stanley V SSG Tilley, Christopher R, SSG White, Kenta D Battle of Somme SLC February While looking for battles that involved Field Artillery there were many that came to mind however, we went off the beaten path and chose one that showed how if you depend on one element too much it can hinder your The Somme Heroism and Horror in the First World War First Gilbert has unearthed fascinating details of the campaign An unforgettable read The Philadelphia Inquirer At a.m on July , , the first Allied soldiers climbed out of their trenches along the Somme River in France and charged into no man s land, toward the barbed wire and machine guns at the German front lines. Battle of Le Transloy The Battle of Le Transloy was the last big attack by the Fourth Army of the British Expeditionary Force BEF in the Battle of the Somme in France, during the First World War.The battle was fought in conjunction with attacks by the French Tenth and Sixth armies on the southern flank and the Reserve th Army on the northern flank, against Heeresgruppe Rupprecht Field Marshal Rupprecht of The History Place Great Speeches Collection Woodrow In January , some ten months before the end of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson appeared before a joint session of Congress and gave this address suggesting possible peace terms to end the four year old European conflict. Things You May Not Know About the Battle of the Somme This year marks the centenary of the Battle of the Somme, which took place between st July and th November The battle was a joint offensive by the British and French forces fought along both sides of the River Somme in France aimed at decisively defeating

  • Title: Somme Mud
  • Author: E.P.F. Lynch
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • It s the end of the 1916 winter and the conditions are almost unbelievable We live in a world of Somme mud We sleep in it, work in it, fight in it, wade in it and many of us die in it We see it, feel it, eat it and curse it, but we can t escape it, not even by dying Edward Lynch enlisted when he was just 18 one of thousands of fresh faced men who were proudly wa It s the end of the 1916 winter and the conditions are almost unbelievable We live in a world of Somme mud We sleep in it, work in it, fight in it, wade in it and many of us die in it We see it, feel it, eat it and curse it, but we can t escape it, not even by dying Edward Lynch enlisted when he was just 18 one of thousands of fresh faced men who were proudly waved off by the crowds as they embarked for France It was 1916 and the majority had no idea of the reality of the Somme trenches, of the traumatised soldiers they would encounter there, of the innumerable, awful contradictions of war Private Lynch was one of those who survived, and on his return home in 1919, wrote Somme Mud in pencil in over 20 school exercise books, perhaps in the hope of coming to terms with all that he had witnessed there Written from the perspective of an ordinary Tommy and told with dignity, candour and surprising wit, Somme Mud is a testament to the human spirit, for out of the mud that threatened to suck out a man s soul rises a compelling story of humanity and friendship It is a rare and precious find.

    One thought on “Somme Mud”

    1. We are so accustomed to seeing war in movies and on television, sanitized of the true horror of the battlefield, a book like this can be both enlightening and traumatizing. There's a very interesting scene over halfway into the book, where the narrator joins the generals at the infantry command headquarters, high on a hill, with a view of the conflict which embraces the entire front line as it makes steady progress in pursuit of the German army. From up there at a comfortable distance, it all lo [...]

    2. Somme Mud is a memoir by E. F. Lynch, written in the 1920s, and published in 2006. This book has been repeatedly called the Australian All Quiet on the Western Front, and has apparently started to be included on school reading lists to try and make callow young school children understand What Their Forefathers Went Through. This book is an absolutely startling testament to the psyche of the soldiers. It will resonate with anyone who is interested in the ANZAC experience, but I think it has broad [...]

    3. Every now and then one comes across an especially extraordinary book. Somme Mud, real diary of an Australian infantryman serving in the trenches in World War I, is one such book.It’s not a perfect book: some aspects of Lynch’s time at war are skipped over, such as time spent recovering from wounds or when resting between campaigns. Whether this is down to Lynch, or the editor who knocked the diary into shape posthumously, I don’t know. Overall, these don’t detract from what is an excelle [...]

    4. This book is a must read, particularly for young Australians.If you expect a journey through the politics and tactics of the war this is not what you are gonna get with this book. Although This is not a diary, it pretty much reads as the diary of a man, that like many others went trough an extraordinary experience of relentless violence. With this book you are placed right in the trenches of the western front and the author will describe it all for you in extreme detail, from the sea of mud to t [...]

    5. This is the second time I have read this book and it must rate among the best books ever written on World War One. This book is detailed with heart felt anguish and humour. It is at times shockingly honest but never over the top! I believe it is a must read! Rates up there with"All Quiet on the western Front" and "The Middle Part of Fortune" as an in-depth look into the life of a Soldier in World War One written by those that witness and experienced it!

    6. Somme Mud is a memoir by E. F. Lynch, written in the 1920s, and published in 2006. This book has been repeatedly called the Australian All Quiet on the Western Front, and has apparently started to be included on school reading lists to try and make callow young school children understand What Their Forefathers Went Through. This book is an absolutely startling testament to the psyche of the soldiers. It will resonate with anyone who is interested in the ANZAC experience, but I think it has broad [...]

    7. Generally war memoirs fall into 2 categories. Those listing battles, date and times and those more personal accounts. For some reason the latter category tend to be lacking when it comes to the 1st world war, and those that exist tend to be hard going.However Somme Mud is one rare breeds , a world war 1 book, readable, engaging and enthralling while at the same time painting a realistic picture of what it was like to be a WW1 soldier . I cannot recommend this book highly enough. With the 100 yea [...]

    8. What a fantastic way of showing young readers a slice of Aussie History. Incredibly written and engaging. Factual and honest. I feel as though it started to lag towards the end, but all in all, I thoroughly enjoyed this book!

    9. This is one of my all time favourites. The way I found myself engaging with the characters made it feel almost like I was watching a tv series.

    10. the bullets won’t hurt you unless they hit you This is a book about the war experiences of an Australian infantryman in France from 1916 to 1919.‘It’s the end of the 1916 winter and the conditions are almost unbelievable. We live in a world of Somme mud. We sleep in it, fight in it, wade in it and many of us die in it. We see it, feel it, eat it and curse it, but we can’t escape it, not even by dying.’To read this book is to be immersed, uncompromisingly, in the brutal conditions of th [...]

    11. Somme Mud: The Australian All's Quiet on the Western Front. This work is an autobiographical account of a young Aussie who went off to war in 1916, finding himself fighting in some of the worst battles of the long war (The Somme (1916); Passchendaele (1917)) as well as dealing with the frantic final battles of 1918. It is a relentless account of battle, injury, misery, suffering, death and survival. The language and attitude is of a man of his time, so quite a few ethnic slurs, etc. Still, Lynch [...]

    12. Probably the best book on WW1 from the point of view of the ordinary infantryman in the trenches I've ever read. Lynch writes from a first persons perspective and captures life in and around the trenches brilliantly. He has a captivating way with words that succeeds in bringing you there, so close to the action you can almost smell the sour stench of warfare, feel the cold mud sticking to your boots, feel the fear of bullets 'phut, phut, phut' whizzing around and realise the overwhelming odds Ly [...]

    13. An exceptional read, in fact Somme Mud is my favorite memoir from the 1st world war. If you read one WW1 memoir read this one.It follows a young naive Australian volunteer who hears the call from the motherland who along with many of his kinsmen volunteer mainly because it sounds like a laugh and bit of a jaunt.The book covers the whole period of his military service from volunteering, the sea voyage to Europe, his service in France right through to his eventual return home to Australia.He bring [...]

    14. A guy from work loaned me his copy and I thought it is one of the best accounts of The First World War I've read (so far). And having read and reutrned his copy, I purchased one too, to share with others.People need to read books like this to understand why war is a bad idea. Perhaps all world leaders need a copy then they will stop sending our soldiers out to die!I found this book so facinating because it answered many questions I had about how trench warfare happened, what day to day living wa [...]

    15. Somme Mud by Edward Lynch is the story of Private Lynch who was 18 when he enlisted in the army with his mates in Sydney in 1915. A soldier's eye view of the senseless slaughter in France 1916-1918. It was powerful. Sad. Down to earth. Lyrical at times. He wrote it in 1921 probably to exorcise his demons, but it was not published until 1994.His method of getting through it was not to think. The blunt description of headless bodies, gassed bodies, bits of bodies, lots of pieces of human remains w [...]

    16. Given the scale of the attrition and the war's profound impact on the fabric of modern day Europe I welcome any book that helps us to remember the shear lunacy of which civilised nations are capable. This book did not disappoint. It seems a believable description of everyday life as a soldier on the western front. For example, Lynch describes many details of the roles and activities of trench warfare. In particular, the stretcher bearers stand-out, as unfortunately they did.Surprising to me is t [...]

    17. A sobering insight into life as an infantryman with the AIF on the Western Front. It took me some time to read this book as I found the reading to be very heavy at times & rightly so. This was without a doubt one of the most descriptive narratives I've read about a soldiers experience on the Western Front. I'm glad I took my time to read it as I think it made me appreciate and recognise each situation as it arose and gave me time to reflect and think about the experiences Nulla had during th [...]

    18. I read this in tandem with the young readers version. I wanted to see what they'd altered or left out - an interesting exercise. In the end I appreciated the historical context presented to younger readers in the other version at the start of each chapter but preferred the adult version - this man and his mates are portrayed in a more honest light (less digger hero) with all the faults, prejudices and behaviours of young single men in extraordinary times. I know there are a lot of these memoir/b [...]

    19. Some parts of this book were simply sensational and provides a real insight to the Australian culture during the first part of the 20th century. I gained a real insight into what it was like on the front and the hardship and terror that our forefathers went through. Some sections became a little bogged down and other parts which would have been of interest were skipped over. I appreciate the book was taken from the author's diaries and it may be that there simply were no entries made for long pe [...]

    20. Interesting to read this alongside the adult version. Definitely cleaned up a racist incident and condensed scenes to remove some of the things that portray the "mates" in a less heroic light. Still a worthwhile read for students studying history in HS or just interested in the digger experience. I appreciated the sections before each chapter that put it in historical context as I am no expert on WWI. I wonder how much of the 'big picture' the soldiers had while fighting.

    21. Perhaps only an Aussie can tell this tale. It needs a certain wry detachment and humour. It takes a real stretch of the imagination to conjure up the conditions prevalent in the trenches of the Somme and the Ypres salient during the period covered by this account. Extremely well written and highly evocative. A must read for anyone who wants to get closer to this awful experience.

    22. This book made me mad, upset and yet I laughed out loud when reading it as well. In my opinion this book should be on the reading list for high school students. I felt such great pride and yet such great sorrow when reading this book. I've just finished it but I have an urge to start it again! Thank you for sharing this story.

    23. No lead up or causes of war, no grand strategy, this author didn't even know the war was over till he read about it in the news paper. Just a soldier and his mates trying to survive the hell of trench warfare. A very graphic account of the daily horrors an world war one infantryman went through, can thoroughly recommend this book.

    24. A classic. This was written in 1920 by Private Lynch and then edited by Will Davis in the late 90s. A narrative written in the first person about the real stories of WW1. Not a historical account about when, where and why. Good, engaging and descriptive prose about the experiences of the men who bled for our country.

    25. Stark, matter-of-fact, extraordinary. One man's story of the Great War. How did he survive? How did any survive? This is a must read. In doing so you will gain some understanding of what it must have been like on the Western Front, a hundred years ago

    26. A truly memorable account of one man's life fighting on the western front. The every day horrors of life in the mud and blood of Flanders were truly brought to life in this amazing novel. If you want to know what life was really like for the average man in the trenches, this is the book for you.

    27. This is one of the best books I have ever read. It should be compulsory reading in every Australia school. These brave men died so that we can celebrate the lifestyle and freedom we so readily and thanklessly enjoy.

    28. Lynch produced one of the finest memoirs to come out of the trenches of the Western Front in World War I. An Australian infantry soldier, Lynch was wounded five times but survived to relate all the horror and agony of trench warfare. Excellent read!

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