Seed of Light

Seed of Light The Solarian was a hundred metres high and at its broadest point twenty metres in diameter It was designed to carry an initial crew of ten people five men and five women with provisions for children

  • Title: Seed of Light
  • Author: Edmund Cooper
  • ISBN: 9780340219904
  • Page: 331
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The Solarian was a hundred metres high and, at its broadest point, twenty metres in diameter It was designed to carry an initial crew of ten people five men and five women with provisions for children For the ship was a self contained world, required to support human life independently for centuries This is the story of these men and women, and the incredible gener The Solarian was a hundred metres high and, at its broadest point, twenty metres in diameter It was designed to carry an initial crew of ten people five men and five women with provisions for children For the ship was a self contained world, required to support human life independently for centuries This is the story of these men and women, and the incredible generations who followed them.

    One thought on “Seed of Light”

    1. Edmund Cooper is a bit of gamble as far as I am concerned. When I was first picking up books to read for myself I stumbled across a number of books by Mr Cooper - being not very knowledgeable or experienced I went by the cover (I know) and not by the content.So begin my weird journey with Edmund Cooper. His work varies a lot from sheer drama (Cloud Walker) comic book action (As Richard Avery and the Expendables) to thinly veiled social criticism (Who needs men). He not only wrote but also review [...]

    2. Holy cow ! What a book !! I am completely amazed by the progress of the story that takes place in it. Surprisingly, this was a wonderful read. This was the fourth title I read by Edmund Cooper, and I was a bit afraid at first because of its relatively less rating (3.38) at the time I picked it up. But now, I can openly say this book has certainly been one of those under-rated ones.Seed of Light is a very short novel by pages. But the story spans nearly a millennium. Being written in the Cold War [...]

    3. Ho hum.Written in the late 50s and certainly showing its age - the commonwealth as a world power anyone? Mankind destroys earth through nuclear war. A few lucky souls escape to find a new planet. After a thousand years odyssey and many false starts their descendants stumble upon earth again, having somehow gone back fifty thousand years. A new Dawn for Mankind. Will they foul it up again.Stilted, formulaic and misogynist. Don't bother.

    4. 'Seed of Light' was written in 1958 and is very much of its time. It sees the Commonwealth as a political entity acting independently of the US, and able to steal a march on the American and Soviet space programmes by launching a space station while the other two are recovering from an 'atomic war'. Unfortunately British efforts to use the station as a peacekeeping presence, precipitate a thermonuclear war. Europe is reduced to three domed cities, each a building a multi-generation 'seed ship' t [...]

    5. Around the first third of the book is set in the present day (at the time of writing) as tensions gradually increase between three competing superpowers, ultimately leading to nuclear war. It's not explained how, but five cities in Europe survive within protective domes and begin to construct starships in an attempt to send a small group to start a colony on another planet. I felt that this part of the book isn't really the meat of the story and could have been dealt with a lot quicker to set th [...]

    6. This was by far the least favorite book I've read by Edmund Cooper so far. A Far Sunset, Transit, All Fool's Day these I remember being rather good. But this volume, though interesting at times, suffers from a variety of flaws. I found the earlier sections to be too drily didactic, with rather heavy-handed social commentary coming out of the mouths of the characters in excessive volume. In fact, through most of the book, I thought the dialog was often stilted and not very enjoyable to read. I i [...]

    7. First published in 1959, my 1977 Coronet edition of Edmund Cooper’s second published novel is an enjoyable example of the once popular ‘generation-ship’ sub-genre. The characterisations are a little silly at times, and ‘generation-ship’ stories have been told with much more panache by Harry Harrison and Brian Aldiss, but in spite of this it is a good read.

    8. Seed of Light (1959) is a Generation-Starship novel in which a small group manages to escape from a devastated Post-Holocaust Earth.

    9. I read this book so long ago that I can't remember what I thought of it, though at the time I adored Edmund Cooper books so I must've enjoyed it - definately one to re-read!

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