The Collected Poems of Robert Lowell

The Collected Poems of Robert Lowell Frank Bidart and David Gewanter have compiled the definitive edition of Robert Lowell s work from his first impossible to find collection Land of Unlikeness to the early triumph of Lord Weary s Cas

Collected Poems W H Auden Collected Poems W H Auden on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Between and his death in , W H Auden endowed poetry in the English Collected Poems Philip Larkin, Anthony Thwaite Collected Poems Philip Larkin, Anthony Thwaite on FREE shipping on qualifying offers One of the best known and best loved poets of the English

  • Title: The Collected Poems of Robert Lowell
  • Author: Robert Lowell
  • ISBN: 9780571163403
  • Page: 364
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Frank Bidart and David Gewanter have compiled the definitive edition of Robert Lowell s work, from his first, impossible to find collection, Land of Unlikeness to the early triumph of Lord Weary s Castle, winner of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize to the brilliant willfulness of his versions of poems by Sappho, Baudelaire, Rilke, Montale, and other masters in Imitations toFrank Bidart and David Gewanter have compiled the definitive edition of Robert Lowell s work, from his first, impossible to find collection, Land of Unlikeness to the early triumph of Lord Weary s Castle, winner of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize to the brilliant willfulness of his versions of poems by Sappho, Baudelaire, Rilke, Montale, and other masters in Imitations to the late spontaneity of The Dolphin, winner of another Pulitzer Prize to his last, most searching book, Day by Day This volume also includes poems and translations never previously collected, and a selection of drafts that demonstrate the poet s constant drive to reimagine his work Collected Poems at last offers readers the opportunity to take in, in its entirety, one of the great careers in twentieth century poetry.

    One thought on “The Collected Poems of Robert Lowell”

    1. Lowell has long been one of my favorite 20th century American poets. I especially like his early work--there's something about the stern, stentorian rhythm of the verse, combined with a hardscrabble New England outlook on life, that never fails to thrill. He's a formal master, alive to his influences, who also has a keen eye for the arresting detail and a penetrating honesty. Some of his poems, like The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket, have haunted me for years.

    2. From the fall of Rome to that of the World Trade Center, a cloying, mindless and absurdist sincerity characterizes most political poetry, which often reads like paid-for newspaper memorials to lost loved ones. No one would have known better than Robert Lowell, whose long-awaited, monumental volume of collected verse appeared in June of this year, that politics suffers from the dangerous and inevitable curse of abstraction—simplistic “us vs. them” theories are perennial favorites—unless i [...]

    3. The book is a comprehensive collection of Lowell’s work. Forever the tinker, one of the most interesting aspects of Lowell’s work is that he constantly revised. The collection contains not just the poems from his published collections, but also earlier versions published in literary journals. The book is fascinating in discovering Lowell’s process and how his poetry developed over time.

    4. As to the edition at hand: Bidart and Gewanter have assembled a definitive Lowell text, encompassing all the major works, quite a couple of less significant contributions, as well as a wide array of alternative versions. The notes are especially extensive as to textual variants. The reader gets quite as much Lowell as he could ever want, if not more.Lowell's poetry needs no new criticism by yours truly. It ranges from formalism in rhyme and meter to freer verse, including three books of 14-line [...]

    5. Goodness gracious. I've been working through this gargantuan tome for several years and I've finally finished it.What to say about LowellI was so intimidated and excited to start reading him that I made sure to get a hardcover version of this book over at The Strand because I knew that I'd be taking extensive notes and that it would become holy to me.I'm happy to say that I DID takes notes (so many on some pages that I can barely make out the poem) and it did become holy in the way that great wo [...]

    6. Robert Lowell's poems first came to my notice when I was studying at university. A short section on American writers, novels, plays and poetry. I was totally captivated by Lowell's poems. As a pacifist Lowell spent time in prison for his beliefs. In my view his self-portraits of his time as a patient, suffering from manic depression, in Maclean Hospital is probably the most important. His searingly honesty about his treatment and his portraits of other "in mates" is probably the most heartbreaki [...]

    7. He'd dead--and deadly. I mean Lowell, for his generation, is the one most likely to have made a deal at the crossroads get such consistently twisted lines, tweaked for torsion beyond his dayshe's got a rare combination of highly allusive literary hermeticism complicated by honest and straightforward delivery. He wasn't great to those around him, and his guilt surrounding interpersonal relationships (apparent in many poems) was probably earned, as most biographies relate. People look at early Low [...]

    8. i will always remember bob fondly for introducing me to poetry. i loved his life studies, which i bought while browsing gleebooks's deserted poetry section while i think it was the first harry potter installment was launched downstairs. i liked how the yellow of the fabe&faber edition was kinda pre-faded, and the turd-brown title fonts. i agree, life is shit. i wrote my first poem ever, which took me a few months, imitating lowell, the iambic pentameter, the likable, cute puppy-dog haughtine [...]

    9. Lowell for me, was the Heir apparent to Whitman he can re-translate classical myth with American vernacular and make it sound so exhilirating to the ear his verse drums softly like a New Hampshire breeze and crashes loudly like a marching band. Every line is peirced with an auto-biographic lucidity, in that to get inside his rhythms, one has to give up part of themselves and allow his narrations to take you to interesting places in his sensitive psycheIam still reading again and again

    10. Just read "91 Revere St." Hilarious piece in which Lowell, in his own way, writes about familial tensions like a WASP Woody Allen. In my favorite line, Lowell imagines the family patriarch looking out from his portrait over the heirloom sofa, chairs, and decorations, so symbolic of the family's aging lineal endowment and the source of so much tension, and saying "We are all dealers in used furniture."

    11. This is what it says it is, the collected works of Robert Lowell. It is an excellent book, well edited, but it is all poems, all the time, so you need to really be interested in Robert Lowell's work. I have read perhaps 25% of it at this point, but I'm moving on to other books. I have no doubt I will return to this book as the quality of his work really hits a good place for me.

    12. It's almost too much to take in. I've had this for years, but I'm still going back to it, poem by poem. I've noticed Lowell tends to over-work his poetry, as if they were probably better before he started tinkering with them.

    13. Lowell is a pain in the ass but ultimately rewards the patient reader. Most folks flock to Life Studies and For The Union Dead; I find myself returning again and again to his three sonnet collections (particularly History) and his swan song, Day By Day.

    14. I can't write poetry. But I'm beginning to be able to read it. What I find shocking is that I understand a lot of this book. I've spent my life watching TV and listening to the Beatles. But I get this. It can't be!

    15. Massive 1000+ page book. I will confess that I have not read every piece of his work in the book. Great reference for Robert Lowell's work.

    16. The man's range is incredible, and the translations of the major European poets are top quality. There is so much poetry here that I don't think I'll ever be done with reading the book itself.

    17. No doubt about the importance and value of the poems, but it's a cumbersome edition with erratic notes. See ratings of individual Lowell books for more.

    18. Once I thought Lowell a great poet. Each time I reread him, my estimation decreases. He now seems to me eminently disposable, something I never expected.

    19. imitations is fantastic. "helen" after valery is indiscernably wonderful and frightening.he goes off at the mouth sometimes, though

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