The Coming of God: Christian Eschatology

The Coming of God Christian Eschatology Winner of Grawemeyer Award In this remarkable and timely work in many ways the culmination of his systematic theology world renowned theologian Jurgen Moltmann stands Christian eschatology on its head

  • Title: The Coming of God: Christian Eschatology
  • Author: Jürgen Moltmann Margaret Kohl
  • ISBN: 9780800636661
  • Page: 121
  • Format: Paperback
  • Winner of Grawemeyer Award In this remarkable and timely work in many ways the culmination of his systematic theology world renowned theologian Jurgen Moltmann stands Christian eschatology on its head Moltmann rejects the traditional approach, which focuses on the End, an apocalyptic finale, as a kind of Christian search for the final solution He centers instead on hWinner of Grawemeyer Award In this remarkable and timely work in many ways the culmination of his systematic theology world renowned theologian Jurgen Moltmann stands Christian eschatology on its head Moltmann rejects the traditional approach, which focuses on the End, an apocalyptic finale, as a kind of Christian search for the final solution He centers instead on hope and God s promise of new creation for all things Christian eschatology, he says, is the remembered hope of the raising of the crucified Christ, so it talks about beginning afresh in the deadly end Yet Moltmann s novel framework, deeply informed by Jewish and messianic thought, also fosters rich and creative insights into the perennially nettling questions of eschatology Are there eternal life and personal identity after death How is one to think of heaven, hell, and purgatory What are the historical and cosmological dimensions of Christian hope What are its social and political implications In a heartbreakingly fragile and fragment world, Moltmann s comprehensive eschatology surveys the Christian vista, bravely envisioning our horizons of expectation for personal, social, even cosmic transformation in God.

    One thought on “The Coming of God: Christian Eschatology”

    1. Alternates between promising and atrocious. He has some great sections on the nature of death and time, which are about as good as any I have read. He shows nicely how Revelation 1 contrasts with Greek thought: Christ is the one who is, and was, and is to come (notice he did not say "will be," which is what a good Greek would have said). This shows in a nutshell that the future is the coming of God.Then proceeds with an analysis of Constantinian and Augustinian models of eschatology. If the King [...]

    2. A masterpiece; a central text for anyone wishing to pursue the depths (and heights!) of Christian eschatology.

    3. Jurgen Moltmann is my favorite contemporary Lutheran theologian because he draws on multiple streams of the Christian faith tradition to articulate a holistic, inclusive understanding of the Gospel and its implications for the present age as well as the "life of the world to come." I enjoyed reading this book because of the vast tapestry of sources that the author used to present his vision of Christian eschatology, which is the capstone of his "theology of hope." His exposition is thoroughly bi [...]

    4. I had not read much of Jurgen Moltmann's work before reading this. I am amazed and impressed with this work. He indicates his late conversion to Christianity and "curiosity" being his only theological virtue has made him less systematic and tied to a particular tradition's defense in his theology. The former is almost certainly too modest and the latter is not as true as he would like. (He definitely shows his Calvinist and Lutheran roots here, but in surprising ways.)What I find most meaningful [...]

    5. You can think of this volume as a Protestant “dogmatics” in which Moltmann interprets human history and experience in light of the future toward which we are drawn. I value the way in which Moltmann examines critically common theological assumptions, thereby challenging us embrace a clearer understanding of God’s sovereignty and to practice greater humility. For example, he writes, “Anyone who teaches ‘the principle of grace’ cannot at the same time teach ‘the Last Judgment’ as a [...]

    6. Epic. Mind blowing. My favorite Moltmann book thus far (and I have now read 6; and have just begun *Ethics of Hope* after completing this one) aside from *The Crucified God*. As with other Moltmann books, dense reading in some parts, but bone shiveringly profound in others. Logged 51 highlighted passages - kindleazon/work/the-co

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