The Trinity and the Kingdom

The Trinity and the Kingdom An excellent introduction to the prophets and the prophetic literature The goal of the book is to understand the thought of the prophets in their historical contexts and to communicate that understan

  • Title: The Trinity and the Kingdom
  • Author: Jürgen Moltmann Margaret Kohl
  • ISBN: 9780800628253
  • Page: 244
  • Format: Paperback
  • An excellent introduction to the prophets and the prophetic literature The goal of the book is to understand the thought of the prophets in their historical contexts, and to communicate that understanding for our time Its approach, while innovative, builds upon he best of contemporary analysis of the prophetic literature Gene M Tucker Candler School of TheologyAn excellent introduction to the prophets and the prophetic literature The goal of the book is to understand the thought of the prophets in their historical contexts, and to communicate that understanding for our time Its approach, while innovative, builds upon he best of contemporary analysis of the prophetic literature Gene M Tucker Candler School of Theology Emory University Koch s first volume on the prophets of ancient Israel displays his sound and creative scholarship and will fill a bibliographical gap.He displays the individuality of each prophet with perceptive insight, but he also compares and interrelates them in his various summaries Further, Koch relates his study of individual prophets to theological currents that have been flowing through the scholarly world in recent decades Bernhard W Anderson Princeton Theological Seminary

    One thought on “The Trinity and the Kingdom”

    1. Jurgen Moltmann offers an eclectic approach to Trinitarian theology: examine the nature of the Trinity through the cipher of the Suffering God—and his project is largely a failure. He begins the narrative with what one assumes is his earlier argument on divine possibility. At this point J.M. jettisons the historic Christian teaching on the topic. While I understand his wanting to take the problem of evil and suffering seriously, it appears he sells the farm in the process. Further, it is not c [...]

    2. One of my favorite books ever is Moltmann's The Crucified God. This work influenced me greatly in regards to God and the cross, the amazing beauty of the incarnation. I also enjoyed his first, classic, work Theology of Hope. That said, both these books were quite difficult. The Trinity and the Kingdom is not easy, but it seems less difficult than those other two. In some ways, Moltmann's conclusions in those previous works (and probably others) serve as a background to this work. Yet this work c [...]

    3. This book gets off to a slow start, but is well worth the time in the end. Moltmann comes to some breathtaking and fantastic conclusions concerning the relationship between the trinity and political theology. I don't appreciate his unfair critique of Barth and his doctrine of the trinity.

    4. Moltmann provides the most helpful and easiest-to-comprehend explanation of the Christian Trinity that I have ever read. He helpfully frames the necessity of understanding God as longing for relationship, a community in the heart of the very being of God. Moltmann rejects both the un-biblical notion of God as a pseudo-Greek static being, and the post-Enlightenment view of God as the ultimate personalized individual. Instead, he uses biblical references and clear and logical thinking to demonstra [...]

    5. Moltmann's engagement with Trinitarian theology is highly thought-provoking. One thing I greatly appreciated was his insistence that, following the biblical writers, we must begin by talking about the threeness of God and then move toward oneness. In line with this, I think he successfully demonstrated the inadequacy of some western formulations of the trinity that consider it sufficient to say that the different persons all share the same 'divine substance,' as though this were all that mattere [...]

    6. I'm not really sure what to make of this book. Moltmann has some very intriguing ideas about the Trinity as a genuine community of persons and the deficiencies of what he calls "Christian monotheism," but I'm not sure how well-supported they are. He often seems to be making assertions without detailed argument to support them, so they're hard to evaluate. In general, I'm skeptical of "social" accounts of the Trinity, but this probably merits a re-read at some point.

    7. This book by Moltmann really re-conceptualizes the idea of the Trinity. It makes the doctrine relevant again to a world in search of a variety of ways to experience God. Moltmann writes, "Here, thinking in relationships and communities is developed out of the doctrine of the Trinity, and is brought to bear on the relation of men and women to God, to other people and to mankind as a whole, as well as on their fellowship with the whole creation" (19). Good stuff.

    8. Stimulating volume (as was his _Crucified God_) the whole notion of a suffering God, etc. Smacks too much of a "social Trinity" model. Too much inconsistency and incoherence for my simple mind Good discussion and summaries of historical models and issues, yet he seems to toss them out for his own axes that he grinds _Crucified God_ was better, but in general, I am not persuaded that Moltmann is all that he is made out to be.

    9. Moltmann's treatment of God's choice to suffer because of His love is amazing, though his arguments for panentheism, claim that God HAD to create, and egalitarianism seem lacking. Wonderful treatment of eternal generation though. Seems to go on a bit at times, but if nothing else the second and fifth chapters are worth buying the book.

    10. Some concepts were difficult for me to understand, but the chapter on the passion of God was wonderful. Moltmann stretches my understanding of who/what the Trinity is, and what those implications are for human beings and the world. I will need to reread it in order to better understand.

    11. After reading a lot from Moltmann over the past year, this book stands out as one of his best. Might even be my favorite!

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