Crowns in a Changing World

Crowns in a Changing World At the death of Queen Victoria in almost every European nation was a monarchy most linked by close family ties to her and Edward VII the uncle of Europe Prior to the outbreak of World War I t

  • Title: Crowns in a Changing World
  • Author: John Van der Kiste
  • ISBN: 9780750934312
  • Page: 258
  • Format: Paperback
  • At the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, almost every European nation was a monarchy, most linked by close family ties to her and Edward VII, the uncle of Europe Prior to the outbreak of World War I, the personal relationships of Edward, and of his successor and son, George V, flourished with the other royal families of Europe The closeness of the European families was viAt the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, almost every European nation was a monarchy, most linked by close family ties to her and Edward VII, the uncle of Europe Prior to the outbreak of World War I, the personal relationships of Edward, and of his successor and son, George V, flourished with the other royal families of Europe The closeness of the European families was violently interrupted by the outbreak of war in 1914, and the armistice of 1918 brought three empires, namely Germany, Austria Hungary and Russia, crashing down Some monarchies were strengthened, and others weakened beyond repair In this well researched study, John Van der Kiste has drawn upon previously unpublished material for the Royal Archives, Windsor, to show the realtionships between the crowned heads of Europe in the first part of the 20th century His account sheds new light on foreign policy leading up to World War I.

    One thought on “Crowns in a Changing World”

    1. The generation that passed between the death of Victoria and the accession of her son, Edward VII, in 1901 and the death of Edward’s son, George V, in 1936 was one of great change not only in the British monarchy but in kingdoms and empires throughout Europe. Edward’s personal power was subject to the close limitations of the unwritten English constitution, but his cosmopolitan personality and astute knowledge of international affairs gave him great informal authority, especially since the e [...]

    2. I love John van der Kiste's books - they're usually on the smaller side, but always informative, enjoyable and impecably researched. "Crowns in a Changing World" is no exception.The book discusses how Europe and its royal houses changed from 1901 (the year Queen Victoria passed away) until 1936 (when her grandson George V died). It analyzes the relationship between monarchs who were siblings, uncles and aunts, nephews and nieces and how those ties influenced international relations (especially i [...]

    3. These were all starting to flow together.Monarchies at the beginning of the 20th century was not a good time. They all seemed rather building straw houses while waiting for the wolves.Everyone was sad, no one was happy, and this book had nothing new. It's not bad, but I think everyone is better served if they just read specific books about the specific countries rather than depending on this book.These books do a good job of filling in the cracks of my knowledge, but you may want more from a boo [...]

    4. An excellent look at European monarchies during one of the most challenging times to be a monarch. The family relations between various countries and rulers, the surge of republicanism, the mad behavior of Wilhelm II and the diplomacy of Edward VIII and more is covered by this book. A wealth of information written in an easy reading manner without sacrificing accuracy is so rare to find, but Van der Kiste delivers every time! Excellent read!

    5. A very good summary of events occurring within all the royal families of Europe from 1901-1936 using the British royal family archives mostly. Very good, and very concise so you are able to follow it well without getting lost among all the names and places. Very well written and as with all of JOhn Van Der Kiste's books it didn't drag on, he keeps you turning the pages and included lots of corresponding photographs.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *