Nightpool

Nightpool Injured in battle with the Dark Raiders sixteen year old Tebriel is healed by a colony of talking otters and sets out to fight the Dark and its forces of evil in the world of Tirror

  • Title: Nightpool
  • Author: Shirley Rousseau Murphy
  • ISBN: 9780060243609
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Injured in battle with the Dark Raiders, sixteen year old Tebriel is healed by a colony of talking otters and sets out to fight the Dark and its forces of evil in the world of Tirror.

    One thought on “Nightpool”

    1. The first novel I remember ever finishing on my own. A great fantasy world that opened my mind to the entire genre for the rest of my life.

    2. I first read this book when I was in 7th grade and was just starting to get into fantasy books. At the time I was not in the habit of keeping a list of books that I read, so a few years later, when I started, I could not remember the name of this book. I wanted to get a copy of the trilogy but since this was in the dinosaur age, before the time of Google and so on, I didn't have any luck. Over the last almost 20 years I have thought of this book often, and I have searched for it but to no avail. [...]

    3. I own the third book in this series, so when I saw this library actually HAD the first two, I thought it was high time to figure out what happens BEFORE mine. Not that I've read the one I own, yet. Which is probably better, since I didn't have a ton of spoilers. Hm. I liked all the talking animals, and the otter society especially, but the story kept feeling very flat. In the end, it almost made me angry that the bad guys are bad just because that's what they ARE (well, I've seen it done better, [...]

    4. Sadly, this didn't hold up quite so well to adult reading as some of the other blasts from the past I've been going through lately. It's the world-building that's the sticking point for me; both the talking animals who act more or less like humans and the unquestioned belief in the divine right of kings evoke eyebrow-raising, if not outright eye-rolling. What saves it is the writing, which is lyrical and graceful leaning almost towards archaic in genre terms--if I didn't have the copyright page [...]

    5. This is a wonderful novel, by a little known author with a terrific level of talent. An evil, and dark power has flexed its muscles over the land of Tirror. The king of Auric is killed, but his son, Prince Tebriel manages to escape. He is protected by the animals that used to once co-exist peacefully with humans. The animals can no longer hide him however, from the dark forces that have inhabited Tirror, or from his destiny. Teb will look to the dragons who rule the skies.This was a very quick r [...]

    6. I remember reading this book many times as a child, so rereading it was like revisiting a childhood playground. This book is the reason otters were my favorite animal, and why I always wanted to be a bard for Halloween. It has probably been more than a decade and a half since I read it, and I still enjoyed it, though not in the same way as I did when I was a child. This time, part of the enjoyment was remembering how I read it as a child, and what it meant to me then.

    7. Tirror was once peaceful- people and speaking animals lived in harmony and peace. Then the dark forces came, and ruined everything. Once peaceful people became warlike, and trusted subjects turned against their rulers.One such vassal, Sivich, murdered Everard, king of Auric , took over his kingdom and enslaved his children, 12-year-old Tebriel and 14-year-old Camery. Thanks to loyal friends, Teb was able to escape from Sivich's cruelty. He hid first among the speaking foxes (friends from his you [...]

    8. This book is the first of the Dragonbards series, YA fiction from the late 1980s. It's shorter than most books today, which means a super-quick read. In this world, some people are born with dragon birthmarks that indicate they will become dragonbards and bond with a Singing Dragon. These are different than ordinary dragons, being both larger and having magic. The bards and dragons fulfill an important social role: they remind people of their past, which is key to who they are. In the time of th [...]

    9. Prefacing this with a disclaimer: many years ago I read Dragonbards. It was before I knew that it was the third in a series and I didn't remember much of it when I was reading this.I liked this book. I did. However, it started off very slow and was hard to get into. I liked the plot, although when I finished I didn't really feel like anything had happened.The light/dark theme is a little strong for me. I would've rathered something a little more subtle.The writing itself was also not great. Read [...]

    10. I HAD BEEN SEARCHING FOR THIS BOOK FOR MANY MANY YEARS AND THANKS TO THE INTERNET I FOUND IT . I FIRST READ IT WHEN I WAS 12 AND ALL I COULD REMEMBER WAS A BOY RAISED BY GIANT OTTERS AND DRAGONS IT IS AMAZING WHAT ELSE YOU GET OUT OF A BOOK FROM YOUR CHILDHOOD WHEN YOU REREAD IT AS AN ADULT

    11. A solid first book in a trilogy, I especially liked the otters as characters and the society they had. The dragons seems intriguing and I am looking forward to the rest of the books.

    12. For an adult audience, I would not give this book (or its sequels) 5 stars, but I first read this series as a kid, and for that audience I do give it 5 stars.

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