The Second Earth: The Pentateuch Re-Told

The Second Earth The Pentateuch Re Told The Pentateuch Of The Cosmogony literally meaning the books of the origin of the universe is a fantasy creation myth cycle presented as a pseudo scientific decipherment of an ancient document Beginn

  • Title: The Second Earth: The Pentateuch Re-Told
  • Author: Patrick Woodroffe
  • ISBN: 9781850280439
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Pentateuch Of The Cosmogony literally meaning the 5 books of the origin of the universe is a fantasy creation myth cycle presented as a pseudo scientific decipherment of an ancient document Beginning with a description of how the document came to be found, it then details the ideographic language employed ideograms are like, for example, our modern road signsThe Pentateuch Of The Cosmogony literally meaning the 5 books of the origin of the universe is a fantasy creation myth cycle presented as a pseudo scientific decipherment of an ancient document Beginning with a description of how the document came to be found, it then details the ideographic language employed ideograms are like, for example, our modern road signs before presenting a suggested interpretation which takes up the bulk of the work The text is laid out as a series of 5 books each sub divided into many verses and extensively illustrated Briefly, the story shows how a world was created, populated by deities and men, before being destroyed by the hateful vengeance of an overlooked deity called Ildrinn Ildrinn subsequently took her hate, and her human followers, into a never ending journey through space, an endless search for contentment It is of course based on known creation myth cycles, but is also an allegorical look at the condition of humanity.While the story may not be to everybody s taste, the colourful illustrations will attract attention Some are large scale paintings covering a whole page or , while others are smaller details which accompany the text All are rendered in Woodroffe s highly imaginative style, depicting a world full of strange mutated beings, like an evil flying spider with eagle s wings and beak, or an underwater fairy with a fish like body One or two of the set piece paintings are simply stunning for example Peace The Happy Savage is a skillful evocation of a pastoral heavenly innocence with a wealth of fine detail From progarchives Review

    One thought on “The Second Earth: The Pentateuch Re-Told”

    1. Every now and again I stumbled across another (though increasingly harder to find) book published from Paper Tiger - this time from Patrick Woodroffe - and its a classic Woodroffe.The book itself is the fictional telling of the first five books of the origins of the universe with accompanying artwork. There is really not much more to add that has not either been covered off in Good Reads own entry on this book or the link to the works of Dave Greenslade who Woodroffe had collaborated with on a n [...]

    2. An art book with text. The story revolves around a pseudo-religious text outlining the creation and evolution of life on Earth via fantastic, allegorical poetry which was found in a dead spaceship orbiting the planet right around the year 3000.Sort of. It's complicated.The pictures are beautiful and the mythos interesting. The cosmology created by the author is complete and authentic-sounding. I've heard weirder creation myths before today, most of which some people actually believe.Religion is [...]

    3. I loved everything about Woodroffe's The Second Earth. The narrative is presented as a highly comprehensive visual mythology regarding Man's life on his original homeworld with the 'text' and imagery having been found aboard an alien spacecraft a few centuries from now.Woodroffe's text is carefully written - told in a verse and style reminiscent of sacred texts; it's then accompanied by faux scholars' opinions in an introduction and appendix. Then, the paintings that accompany the stories are bo [...]

    4. It's been over 20 years since I read this, but a chance comment reminded me of it. I'm a little conflicted how to rate it. On the one hand, it had a very significant impact on the younger me in my formative years and I remember loving it. On the other hand, I don't really remember any of the details and I wonder how it would hold up if I read it today. I intend to re-read it, and I may change my rating up or down after that.

    5. This was an interesting read at first, but really starts to drag. The art is very well done and beautiful, and as a coffee table book this would be good, just an interesting something to leave around and flip through on occasion, not really something to read cover to cover.

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