Doctor Who: The Gunfighters

Doctor Who The Gunfighters Back in the gun totin hard hittin fast shootin days of the Old Wild West when outlaws ruled the land and the good guys stayed off the streets a troupe of traveling players Miss Dodo Dupont Stev

  • Title: Doctor Who: The Gunfighters
  • Author: Donald Cotton
  • ISBN: 9780426201953
  • Page: 228
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Back in the gun totin , hard hittin , fast shootin days of the Old Wild West, when outlaws ruled the land and the good guys stayed off the streets, a troupe of traveling players Miss Dodo Dupont, Steven Regret and the mysterious Doctor Caligari moseyed into the town of Tombstone one October afternoon Their method of transportation was a mite peculiar though After alBack in the gun totin , hard hittin , fast shootin days of the Old Wild West, when outlaws ruled the land and the good guys stayed off the streets, a troupe of traveling players Miss Dodo Dupont, Steven Regret and the mysterious Doctor Caligari moseyed into the town of Tombstone one October afternoon Their method of transportation was a mite peculiar though After all, a police box materializing out of thin air sure ain t the usual way to enter a sedate town like Tombstone And when the Doctor and his pardners meet up with Wyatt Earp and the notorious Clanton brothers, they soon find out that the scene is all set for high noon at the O.K Corral.

    One thought on “Doctor Who: The Gunfighters”

    1. Save me from Brits who try to write American. It comes off poorly, even if it's done well, and it's not done well here. The only thing that I can imagine that might be worse is Brits on television trying to play American, so I am grateful that I have never seen this episode of Doctor Who. The plot is typical The Doctor being confused for someone else who is supposed to be in the area, in this case Doc Holliday, with the Clanton boys coming to Tombstone looking for revenge.The tale is told in fir [...]

    2. "The Gunfighters" is not one of the more well-regarded serials from the first Doctor's era. So this could be why I skipped Donald Cotton's adaptation of the serial in my Target novel collecting days. I will also admit it's been a long while since I've seen the original serial, though it sits on my DVD shelf. Call me a slave to my completest tendencies. When I saw that the story was coming out as an audio book, I decided I'd take the plunge on it, figuring it would be a nice way to spend a few ho [...]

    3. I've never watched the original episode, but I can't imagine it working as well as the novel.Donald Cotton, who wrote both the original script and the novelization, displayed a terrible grasp of the history of the American west, but a playful willingness to attempt the style of the dime novel's overblown prose.As a result, half of the humor in the book comes from the Clanton brothers and their attempts at literary phrasing, and the other half from near-slapstick versions of Wyatt Earp, Doc Holli [...]

    4. nhwvejournal/825455ml[return][return]Donald Cotton's novelisation of The Gunfighters is, I think justly, acknowledged as one of the great Target novelisations. It takers the basic theme of the televised story, but messes around immensely with the actual plot and details, especially in the last episode. The story is told in flashback, the dying Doc Holliday recounting events to Ned Buntline. The whole thing is done in a brilliant pastiche of Western idiom, and it is very entertaining. (Though I a [...]

    5. Once you get past the heavy use of cowboy/western slang, this is a delightful, witty, and surprisingly subversive novelization. Donald Cotton takes his original TV episodes and transforms them into a twisted ballad of greed, stupidity, violence, coincidenced a lot of laughs. "The Gunfighters" has a love/hate relationship with "Doctor Who" fandom, but this book will be appreciated by all those who recognize Cotton's comedic genius. He even manages to include the ropey song from the original TV br [...]

    6. I've been pretty harsh about the earlier Donald Cotton novels of Doctor Who serials (particularly The Romans) but this one hit the spot for me. I enjoyed the humour of Cotton's approach and the way he developed some of the more bawdy jokes. Yes there are anachronisms but not on the level of The Myth Makers.That said the real star for me is that you can really hear Hartnell's Doctor playing these scenes. I inserted my own 'hmmmm' before the obvious: "Holiday? Yes I suppose it is line." without ev [...]

    7. an interesting attempt at doing a historical story, that comes across better than the actual TV episode did. Mostly because the book plays it completely straight, where the episode camped it up.It tries to just put the Tardis crew in the middle of events leading up to the OK Coral fight, but tends to involve a lot of riding horses back and forth and the occasional bit of gun fighting, rather than any actual plot.The beginning is decent, as was the end, but all that stuff in the middle was pretty [...]

    8. Another of Donald Cotton's light hearted takes on the early Doctor Who stories. While nowhere near as good as his book about Doctor Who and the Romans, this book did make me smile once or twice. The story revolves around the Doctor being mistaken for Doc Holliday and the running around any Dr Who story has as it's essentially a Whitehall Farce in the Wild West. Unfortunately it's not a brilliant story, Stephen and Dodo do nothing much and the Doctor took part in the gunfight at the OK coral, whi [...]

    9. So I wasn't particularly excited to read this one, Stephen and Dodo are some of my least favourite companions and I really don't like Westerns. But this was actually quite fun. Done in the style of a tall tale from the old west it worked really well. It was poking fun at itself and making the most of the cliches which made it lots more fun. I still have no desire to actually see the episode as I fear fake American accents, but I'm glad I read the story.

    10. Cotton has a unique tone when novelizing a Doctor Who episode. As seen in The Romans and The Myth Makers, he takes a far more humorous tone than was originally present, and usually presents the group from an outsider's perspective, as if a character from history is telling the tale. This doesn't always work, and even though The Gunfighters has some great tongue-in-cheek humor, having Doc Holliday talk about the adventures of the TARDIS doesn't really carry well at all.

    11. The humor in this story worked well as an aspect of the setting, and the frame story here fit better than in previous adaptations by Cotton.

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