Dear America: Hear My Sorrow: The Diary of Angela Denoto, a Shirtwaist Worker, New York City 1909

Dear America Hear My Sorrow The Diary of Angela Denoto a Shirtwaist Worker New York City Critically acclaimed author Deborah Hopkinson s HEAR MY SORROW is now back in print with a beautiful new cover Fourteen year old Angela Denoto and her family have arrived in New York City from their v

  • Title: Dear America: Hear My Sorrow: The Diary of Angela Denoto, a Shirtwaist Worker, New York City 1909
  • Author: Deborah Hopkinson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Critically acclaimed author Deborah Hopkinson s HEAR MY SORROW is now back in print with a beautiful new cover Fourteen year old Angela Denoto and her family have arrived in New York City from their village in Italy to find themselves settled in a small tenement apartment on the Lower East Side When her father is no longer able to work as a hod carrier, Angela must leaveCritically acclaimed author Deborah Hopkinson s HEAR MY SORROW is now back in print with a beautiful new cover Fourteen year old Angela Denoto and her family have arrived in New York City from their village in Italy to find themselves settled in a small tenement apartment on the Lower East Side When her father is no longer able to work as a hod carrier, Angela must leave school and find a job in a shirtwaist factory Despite being disappointed that she had to give up her education, Angela is proud that she is able to help her family But soon she begins to wonder about the steep price of the American dream, given the dangerous conditions at the factory Set against the birth of the labor union movement in the early 1900s, Angela finds herself caught up in the drama and turmoil that erupts as the workers begin to strike, protesting the terrible conditions in the sweatshops In the pages of her diary, Angela records the horrors of the Triangle Factory fire, along with the triumphs and sorrows of the labor movement.

    One thought on “Dear America: Hear My Sorrow: The Diary of Angela Denoto, a Shirtwaist Worker, New York City 1909”

    1. I picked this up on a whim at the library in the young adult section. It is a fictional journal account of a young girl based on real events that took place in the sweatshops of New York at the turn of the century. It was a quick read, but educational and eye-opening to the working conditions of these early years.

    2. Angela is a young girl of poor parents who lives in New York in 1909. Although she would like to continue school it becomes necessary for her to drop out of school and get a job in a factory where they make women's clothes.The book centers around the absolutely horrible working conditions that the girls had to suffer under, including incredibly low pay, incredibly long hours and virtually no safety procedures at all. The girls have a nasty floor boss who is always telling them to work faster.The [...]

    3. Fourteen year old Angela Denoto has left Sicily, Italy for New York and went to school to learn for four years. Now she must start work in a shirtwaist factory with her sister Luisa. She becomes friends with Clara and Sarah, both workers in the same factory. When the strike comes, Sarah convinces Angela to join. Right when they think everything is finally settling down, the Triangle Waist factory, where Clara, Luisa and Luisa's best friend Rosa work, catches fire. The owners, locked the doors so [...]

    4. I was really surprised at how sad this book made me. I knew about the strikes and the Triangle Factory fire so I thought I would be prepared. But this book is surprisingly heartfelt and I really felt for the main character who is caught between wanting to get decent working conditions and needing the little money that she gets to support her impoverished family. The descriptions of the actual fire were truly heartbreaking and the thought of being trapped in that building is terrifying. I think t [...]

    5. If you liked this book, you might also enjoy:✱ Uprising✱ Threads and Flames✱ Ashes of Roses✱ Triangle: The Fire That Changed America

    6. i think this is a great book for everyone to read. i would like to tell you though, it is somewhat graphic and it DID make me cry , but it is a great book!

    7. This is a great book. It was extremely sad and I cried when I read it. It's a good way to see how it was for young shirtwaist worker girls at the time.

    8. Angela is a shirtwaist worker and a speaker. It's a sad but good book. All the other books in the Dear America series are good books.

    9. 1909 This was the time when clothes ceased to be made at home and were mass produced in "garment factories." The Industrial Revolution was in full swing! Millions of immigrants had hit the shores of New York City and most of the females worked in the garment industry. By 1910, 70% of the 83,000 workers were young Jewish and Italian girls and women. Thirteen was the age to begin and most did it to help their families. Wages were anywhere from $7.00 - $14.00 a week. Families of 5 were crowded into [...]

    10. A review from my old blogOne thing I find amazing about the Dear America books is that at the end in the epilogue I always wonder if this is a fictional book based on a real person or simply a fictional character living through real events. The epilogue always seems so real.This book focused on the life of Angela Denato, a fourteen/fifteen year old girl forced to drop out of school in order to work to support her family. Angela struggles with the desire to strike and earn better working conditio [...]

    11. I read 120 pages in the first sitting, and finished the book the following night. I loved it! It told the story of Angela Denoto and her family. They were Italian immigrants in New York City. The story begins in 1909, when Angela is forced to leave school and work in the sweatshops with her sister to help support her family. The conditions are horrible, and soon she is caught up in the union movement, acting as a translator at rallies and protests. There is a lot of friction between Angela, unio [...]

    12. This book is more true too the spirit of older Dear America books than a lot of the others in the relaunch series. It focuses on a specific event in history (the spread of labor unions) and how it would have affected the life of an ordinary Italian immigrant girl.Angela isn't the most interesting heroine in the series, but that's okay because her friend Sarah more than makes up for it, and Angela's uncertainty about joining the labor union feels very real for a girl who needs to work to support [...]

    13. It's 1909 in New York City, and fourteen-year-old Angela Denoto has just left school to get a job so she can help support her Italian immigrant family, even though secretly she longs to continue her education. Before she leaves, her teacher gives her a diary as a gift, and Angela begins to write in it. She describes how she gets a job at a shirtwaist factory and faces long working hours in terrible conditions. When the workers go on strike, Angela joins them, but in the end they accomplish littl [...]

    14. A Quickie ReviewThis is the first Dear America book I've read in over 1.5 decades; the last one was a reading assignment for fifth grade history class. An enjoyable story, it's also rather heart-wrenching; the things that poor Angela goes through are terrible, even more so because she was a real person, not just a character in a book. I'd think fans of this series know what to expect; for those who don't, expect a trip back in time.ete with all the harsh realities.Content Concerns:• Sex: None. [...]

    15. I really enjoyed this diary. Although geared towards middle school and above, I found it kept my interest and gave a good background into the history of the early labor unions in New York City during the beginning of the 1900's. It makes you realize and truly appreciate how much the early immigrants went through to pave the way to our working world today. The diary also was based on real people which made it extra special and then gave a brief synopsis of their lives after the Triangle Shirtwais [...]

    16. I do remember the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire in a few of my history books, but it was never more than a sentence or two and it was only on a ghost tour (that's a whole other story) that I learned what a big deal it was. While the fire doesn't figure prominently (and is actually on the periphery) in the book, the events leading up to it (specifically the shirtwaist strike of 1909) are excellently well done.

    17. This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.

    18. i havent read a dear america book in a long while, but this book rung a deep hole in my heart. i never new there was a strike in a sweat shop in the early 1990s, but they way they wrote this book, i pictured how the women jumped out the windows from the fire i loved it and im still in the faze of heart break.

    19. Angela is a character that I can relate to. Many expectations are put on her and she struggles to decide what she thinks is right. She makes a commitment in the beginning of the book and she sticks to it all the way. While the main historical event isn't until the end of the book, Angela gets put into situations that lead up to it and tie the whole book together.

    20. Angela Denoto is a poor Italian immigrant in NYC. She quits school to become a shirtwaist worker, joins the union, and works for reforms with the other girls in the union. When the great tragedy of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company Fire kills many girls, including Angela’s friend Rosa, Angela and the other girls continue to push harder for reforms in the factory system.

    21. I often find immigrant stories fascinating, although the effect of the industrial revolution on their lives is deeply sad. This is one of the more depressing stories, but I felt its importance in the development of the labor movement.

    22. This book was one of the very best in the DEAR AMERICA series. I enjoyed it so much I would easily enjoy reading it a second and third time. It was well written, easily understood and in fact was educational. I highly recommend this book.

    23. For some reason I am fascinated with morbid things, like the Triangle Waist Factory fire. After reading Margaret Peterson Haddix's Uprising earlier in the year, this was a bit of a disappointment, but good for a book of the gradeschool level.

    24. I liked this one. Had a really strong main character and it's an interesting topic for me. Better than the story in Rachel which was more about the romance.

    25. Loved itI loved reading dear America when I was growing up. I still love them to this day. It was always interesting to learn about the world before my time. Great reads for young adults.

    26. I've always loved Dear America, and this one was always my favorite as a child. I finished rereading it today and I still really love it. It's obviously meant for much younger audiences, but I think it's such a moving book.

    27. Excellent (even if it's historical fiction) account on working conditions of the working class at the turn of the century, as well as why unions were so important to those people. I feel the author really got at the really complex nature of the time while still keeping a personal touch to it.

    28. I liked this one a lot, maybe because of my tour of a tenement building on Orchard street in NYC. The book seemed to spring to life for me.

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