Eat, Drink and Remarry: Confessions of a Serial Wife

Eat Drink and Remarry Confessions of a Serial Wife Mr Right A financier who did deals Mr Right A fourth generation German Jewish funeral director Mr Right A handsome Ivy League educated award winning actor Mr Right Dr Perfect a cardiothorac

  • Title: Eat, Drink and Remarry: Confessions of a Serial Wife
  • Author: Margo Howard
  • ISBN: 9780373893041
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Mr Right 1 A financier who did deals Mr Right 2 A fourth generation German Jewish funeral director Mr Right 3 A handsome, Ivy League educated, award winning actor Mr Right 4 Dr Perfect, a cardiothoracic surgeon and the official keeper Being an advice columnist means you ve heard it all What it does not mean is that you get everything right in your own lifMr Right 1 A financier who did deals Mr Right 2 A fourth generation German Jewish funeral director Mr Right 3 A handsome, Ivy League educated, award winning actor Mr Right 4 Dr Perfect, a cardiothoracic surgeon and the official keeper Being an advice columnist means you ve heard it all What it does not mean is that you get everything right in your own life Margo Howard, better known as Dear Prudence, then Dear Margo, can testify to that But before being a syndicated columnist, before writing for national magazines, before becoming an advice maven, Margo was the beloved only child of Jules Lederer, the founder of Budget Rent a Car, and Eppie Lederer known to the world as Ann Landers She was from a time and place where young women went to college and then got married So that is what she did and not just once EAT, DRINK AND REMARRY is the charming and candid memoir of a woman who goes from blushing bride to rice scarred veteran With wit, humor and twenty twenty hindsight she reveals lessons learned from the men in her life In a no holds barred account of the life she s lived there is confirmation that understanding love, and of course people, comes only when we re ready, and that sometimes it really is possible to start over and get things just right.

    One thought on “Eat, Drink and Remarry: Confessions of a Serial Wife”

    1. newrepublic/article/11Before you choose to read this Eat, Drink and Remarry: Confessions of a Serial Wife , read this article from the author about how people just don't 'get' her book

    2. Even if this "memoir" had been well-written and witty--it wasn't, on both counts--I could not endure mire than two chapters of absolute drivel celebrating an elitist, pampered, and entitled existence. The sad part is that there is not a scintilla of plot, characterization, voice--other than whiny--or any other aspect of a real writer's craft from first to last, and I was speed-reading for more than 80%.I feel regret for the trees who died so that this "book" could live. So, someone please shoot [...]

    3. I may have read this book, but going by some reviews I'm afraid it's just not my thing. Possibly b/c I'm a such a dim bulb. I don't know.

    4. The "Readers Also Enjoyed" list to the right is hilarious, assuming everyone sees the same thing I do. It includes: Suicide Ride by E. LlewellynVardin Village by Maggie SpenceThe World Rose by Richard BrittainMy Splendid Concubine by Lloyd LofthouseAmulet of Elusion by Katie Lynn JohnsonSplit River by Riley HillTransgression by Theo FenravenA Throne of Bones by Vox DayDance of the Goblins by Jaq D. Hawkins

    5. I gave up during spouse #3. The negative reviewers aren't being overly harsh - this one's a true "Rich Peoples' Problems" saga.

    6. I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir. Disclosure: I went to school with Howard's children until I was 13--I knew the oldest two. So I of course was interested in the early chapters about her first and second marriages. But I was kept completely absorbed even afterwards. First of all, Howard has a 200-watt style: it's clear (Howard's mother was the advice columnist Ann Landers) that there's some sort of genius for vivid and to-the-point prose that runs in the family. Second of all, she has known many [...]

    7. I didn't really care for Margo as an advice columnist: she was way more ascerbic and flip than her mother (who for me really was the best), so I'm not sure what made me pick up this book, except maybe the title. I just didn't care for it: Margo comes across as very annoying to be around. While I'm glad she found happiness (everyone deserves that) I found that by the time it happened, I just didn't care anymore. (I also just read Margo's New Republic article decrying the poor reviews she got from [...]

    8. **I received this book from a give away***-I down graded this review by two stars after reading Margo's rebuttal to being negatively reviewed by morons who receive 'free swag' and there for can not be trusted to be capable of giving a book review - her privileged life in the memoir didn't not bother me while reading but it comes out loud and clear in her New Republic article. But according to Margo, I'm just someone off the street amassing free stuff and can not be trusted to give a sound opini [...]

    9. You probably have to be living in the 1960's to enjoy this book and all the name dropping that she does which accounts for 80% of the book. "We lived next to [name drop], [name drop], [name drop], and partied with name drop], [name drop], [name drop]" all the while I'm wondering who the heck are these people? This book was less on her love life as the abstract seem to describe and more on the big named (that someone like me born in the 80's have no clue about but assume they're some fancy hoity- [...]

    10. Yes, the author is quite smug and pretentious, when speaking about all of the fabulous things she's done and the A-list people she's friends with (Elizabeth Taylor babysat me! I lived near former President Ronald Reagan!). It's an enjoyable read because she fully admits that her marriages were not well thought out. But that's about the only thing it's good for. She does talk about how she should have made better decisions and thought things out, but the book is more about her super, fabulous, aw [...]

    11. I thought the title was brilliant, and I love funny, irreverent books. But this book became too hard to slog through at the halfway point. For one thing, you could make a drinking game out of every time Howard name-drops, and everyone in your book club would be smashed. And her tale of glitter and privilege is not one many can relate to. Since it isn't actually that funny, and it is annoying, why would you want to read it unless she's a personal friend? And if she is, she might have said somethi [...]

    12. I loved it. Picked it up randomly at the library and discovered she was the original Dear Prudence, a favorite column of mine!

    13. I love Margo Howard's writing. I love this book. Very fast read, some fantastic lines will have you howling with laughter and recognition.Recommended. VERY funny.

    14. Until reading her response to unfavorable reviews in "'s Elite Reviewing Club Sabotaged My Book" (October 16, 2014) in New Republic, I'd been looking forward to reading Margo Howard's book. Besides admiring her mother (best known as "Ann Landers") and aunt (best known as "Abigail Van Buren") as advice columnists, and her father (Julius Lederer) as a business man and innovator, I was curious about what someone with Ms. Howard's track record with marriages, and less than ideal relationships with h [...]

    15. I read this with an open mind. I am not an important famous person, but lay claim to two things. 1, Marie Osmand was briefly my aunt, when she married into my family. Then she divorced, so she no longer is. 2, when I was about 3 John Wayne was working with my father, Ed Taylor, who was making a prop gun for him to use in one of his movies in Bristow, Oklahoma, and when John came to my dad's shop, he actually held me on his lap! Okay, I was also on Captain Kangaroo TV show about 4 times with my s [...]

    16. kind of funny at times, and somewhat snarky tone [as in her stint as "Dear Prudence" columnist on Slate] can be enjoyable. I also liked hearing more about Ken Howard [husband #3], star of one of my favorite TV shows during its brief run, "The White Shadow".Other than thatme-droppy [as daughter of Ann Landers & a wealthy business guy, she grew up around privilege and has traveled in elite/rich/celebrity circles her whole life], blaming [her only fault apparently was inability to see soon enou [...]

    17. I received a copy of this book through First Reads.Eat, Drink and Remarry follows Margo Howard from young adult to the present day in her quest (through four marriages) to find Mr. Right.Margo Howard is straightforward and to the point in describing the thought processes (or lack thereof) that led to each marriage as well as the other steps she took in life. Each marriage happened for a reason, although compatibility and asking herself why she chose to marry seemed not really to come up until l [...]

    18. While I had no idea who this author was when I picked up the book, I found her third marriage the only truly interesting part of the book - there is so little written about Hollywood from the inside that I always ache for people who sell their souls for fame and end up with such sad, ruined lives.With that said, no one but a famous person could have written this book. We never really see Howard's heart or feel anything with her. We see her fall in love 4 times and we read about 3 divorces, but w [...]

    19. I picked up this book on a whim while I was casually walking around the library while the kids were playing. It has big type and is short and perfect for reading while keeping on eye on the kids. However, that being said, it isn't that terrific. It is written by a debutante that has had an extremely privileged life. It is essentially a longer version of People Magazine but at a higher social-economic level. So, why am I reading it? Probably because it doesn't take any brain capacity so I can do [...]

    20. I was always fascinated by the twin sisters who gave advice in the newspapers ("Dear Abby", "Ann Landers") and who had daughters who took over advice franchises-- daughter Margo, being "Dear Prudence" for many years. It seems it is impossible for many reviewers of this book to consider the context --the pampered Margo grew up thinking her only job in life was to get married and have children immediately. Enjoyable quick read that gives a glimpse into three very different milieus, and reminds us [...]

    21. I won this book on .I was wonderfully surprised by this book!! Margo Howard is a genius!! This is a sometimes serious, always fun book. It will definitely be one of my favorites.

    22. What a life Margo Howard has had. She tells her story in and honest and amusing way. It was a quick interesting read. I found myself wishing she was a friend.

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