Sexplosion: From Andy Warhol to A Clockwork Orange-- How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke All the Taboos

Sexplosion From Andy Warhol to A Clockwork Orange How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke All the Taboos After the sexual revolution came the sexual explosionThe six years between and saw sexual taboos challenged than ever before Film literature and theater simultaneously broke through barrie

  • Title: Sexplosion: From Andy Warhol to A Clockwork Orange-- How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke All the Taboos
  • Author: Robert Hofler
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 134
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • After the sexual revolution came the sexual explosionThe six years between 1968 and 1973 saw sexual taboos challenged than ever before Film, literature, and theater simultaneously broke through barriers previously unimagined, giving birth to what we still consider to be the height of sexual expression in our pop culture Portnoy s Complaint, Myra Breckinridge, Hair,After the sexual revolution came the sexual explosionThe six years between 1968 and 1973 saw sexual taboos challenged than ever before Film, literature, and theater simultaneously broke through barriers previously unimagined, giving birth to what we still consider to be the height of sexual expression in our pop culture Portnoy s Complaint, Myra Breckinridge, Hair, The Boys in the Band, Midnight Cowboy, Last Tango in Paris, and Deep Throat.In Sexplosion, Robert Hofler weaves a lively narrative linking many of the writers, producers, and actors responsible for creating these and other controversial works, placing them within their cultural and social frameworks During the time the Stonewall Riots were shaking Greenwich Village and Roe v Wade was making its way to the Supreme Court, a group of daring artists was challenging the status quo and defining the country s concept of sexual liberation Hofler follows the creation of and reaction to these groundbreaking works, tracing their connections and influences upon one another and the rest of entertainment.Always colorful and often unexpected, Sexplosion is an illuminating account of a generation of sexual provocateurs and the power their works continue to hold decades later.

    One thought on “Sexplosion: From Andy Warhol to A Clockwork Orange-- How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke All the Taboos”

    1. It's weird to think that not too long ago, intelligent and well-respected people in the media cavalierly used the words "queer", "fag", and "faggot" to describe homosexuals---without any thought or consideration of the derogatoriness of the terms---on the one hand, while on the other hand lambasted and censured those who cavalierly referred to black people as "niggers" or women as "bitches" or "cunts". The hypocrisy aside (an all-too-easy criticism for those of us living in a more "enlightened" [...]

    2. Sexplosion: From Andy Warhol to Clockwork Orange-- How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke all theTaboos by Robert Hofler is a 2014 IT Books publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Over a six year period of time, movies, stage, books, music, art, and in some ways television began to bring subject matter that was previously buried way underground out into the open. From 1968 to 1973 stage productions like Hair and movies like Mi [...]

    3. Sexplosion is a bona fide page-turner. Hofler’s extensive research into a relatively short period of time bursts forth on the page like a swinging period film. Think Boogie Nights without the “bad-time” consequences in the latter half of the narrative. To be fair, Hofler does present the troubles these trailblazing authors and auteurs met, both from censors and certain sects of the populace not ready for all that taboo-breaking, but overall their efforts are presented in a positive light. [...]

    4. Yes, there was a cultural change in the air from 1968 to 1973, but this poorly edited, poorly researched account lazily assembled from news clippings and ghost-written celebrity memoirs does a poor job of explaining it. Never raising itself above the merely anecdotal, you begin to wonder if the author even took the time to watch half of the films he writes about.

    5. What a fun read - it takes place from 1968 - 1973 - during a few of those years, I was working as an usher at a movie theatre, so I saw a bunch of the films mentioned in this book. This was a fascinating description of a particular time I remember well.

    6. Sexplosion by Robert Hofler was about the taboos that were broken, on stage, screen, and the page, in the 5 year span from 1968 to 1973. Those were my teenage years, and many of the films, plays, and books that Hofler profiles in Sexplosion were ones that had a profound impact on my development as a writer and philosopher. In particular, the films: Clockwork Orange, Trash, and Performance. 1968 was such a turbulent year. The assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr and Robert Kennedy happened th [...]

    7. I feel like this book was written without the consideration of people unfamiliar with this time period. It seemed like it was by and for people who instantly understood the term "Chelsea Girls" and its implications. I also was disappointed that for a book that has a subtitle mentioning Clockwork Orange, there was actually very little about it. There wasn't really any analysis and it more seemed to be a muddled re-telling of cinematic history.

    8. I vividly remember the advertising for many of the films mentioned in this book from the years 1968 to 1973. They were legendary (even when terrible) and everyone was talking about them. Like most of the underage youth of this period, I was too young to see most of them especially A CLOCKWORK ORANGE which intrigued me no end, but I was too young to see an X-rated film. I also remember one Sunday service when our minister suggested to the congregation that they see the X-rated film playing down [...]

    9. Great non-fiction read about the rise of taboo (thought to be during the time) Broadway shows and movies in the 60's and 70's and how those involved tried very hard to allow the public access to these creations, although they were breaking some laws during that time. Most were for shock and awe and not for any real artistic merit. My favorite sections were Hair, including the decision for nudity on stage, and that of Midnight Cowboy. Also Andy Warhol was once freak, obsessed with sex. He's not p [...]

    10. An excellent pop-culture read focused on the period from the late 60s to the early 70s when movies, books, and theater all "grew up" at least in terms of treatment of sexuality. I like that the author is wildly inclusive, bopping around chronologically from Hair and Oh! Calcutta! (on stage) to Updike's Couples and Roth's Portnoy's Complaint (in literature) to a wide range of movies--The Graduate, Barbarella, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Deep Throat, and even to the portrayal of Lance L [...]

    11. Entertainment journalist Robert Hofler (a senior editor at Variety) presents an entertaining account of the revolutionary changes in the world of theatre, books and movies between 1968 and 1973. A highly readable cultural history about a time of massive change that affected the sort of content we could read, watch, see and hear.

    12. Skimmed.The content would make for an interesting class, interactive digital book, or documentary. Since the topic concerns films (none of which I have seen), I'd appreciate more visuals than the few pages of stills included in the book. I'm sure licensing would make such an endeavor prohibitive, though.

    13. In the 1960's there was the sexual revolution with the coming of the 1970s there was a sexplosian in art , movies, literature and fashion!

    14. Fascinating look at a period of about five years when all forms of entertainment changed forever. I couldn't put it down.

    15. Not bad, although reading about nudity (and homosexuality) in film and theatre is somewhat alienating. Lucky there are many anecdotes to make this dry stuff somewhat spicier.

    16. Certainly readable and an accurate picture as long as Hofler sticks to the show business stories, but some of his generalizations and conclusions are wrong--or wishful thinking.

    17. A light read, didn't go as in-depth as I would like but overall it's pretty interesting. A breezy, gossipy read.

    18. 3.5I did really enjoy the book, but it's not quite what I was expecting. Still a great read for anyone interested in the historical aspects of the sex explosion in pop culture.

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