If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It: A Zen Guide to Ending the Pursuit of Happiness

If It Ain t Broke Don t Fix It A Zen Guide to Ending the Pursuit of Happiness About the Author Barry Magid is a Zen teacher in the Ordinary Mind School founded by his teacher Charlotte Joko Beck

Ain t Definition of Ain t by Merriam Webster Is ain t a word Usage Guide Although widely disapproved as nonstandard, and common in the habitual speech of the less educated, ain t is flourishing in American English It is used in both speech and writing to catch attention and to gain emphasis.

  • Title: If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It: A Zen Guide to Ending the Pursuit of Happiness
  • Author: Barry Magid
  • ISBN: 9780861715534
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Paperback
  • About the Author Barry Magid is a Zen teacher in the Ordinary Mind School founded by his teacher, Charlotte Joko Beck

    One thought on “If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It: A Zen Guide to Ending the Pursuit of Happiness”

    1. This is a great book, even dare I say, a necessary book. But there's going to be a lot of people who are not going to like it or what it's saying. Both those who don't understand it, but even more, those who do but are overly invested in the kind of practice Magid is trying to undermine will feel threatened by what he has to say. They need to hear it.This is a naturalist approach to Zen practice. No fantasies of transcendent ever-lasting bliss will be found here. Instead, if you can truly unders [...]

    2. Loved this, non-dogmatic and accessible. I hesitate to summarize so I'll just mention a couple of things. One is that when we begin to meditate (sit) or go into analysis we usually have "curative fantasies" which we might well not even be aware of. We think that zen or analysis (or religion) will in some way "fix" these problesm, that is fix us. The point of zen or analysis then becomes to expose our curative fantasies and to begin to see the problems were wanted to "fix" in a different way.Best [...]

    3. In our achievement-oriented society, we're conditioned to "get" things, be they material things like money, intangibles like success and happiness.Magid, using his experience as a psychoanalyst and Zen teacher, argues that pursuing happiness, however we define it, isn't a worthy goal. He goes further to say that using a practice like meditation to "become happy" weakens rather than strengthens us because it it assumes attainment of a fixed state.Rather, meditation exists for its own sake of allo [...]

    4. I no longer feel like reading about other people practicing this religion or that religion will help me find anything new. I have my own spirituality, and I just need to accept it.Hey, maybe I should write a book about it.No stars because (meh) I don't care enough to influence the average on this one.

    5. he's a psychologist and a buddhist teacher (and a new yorker), and offers very pragmatic and helpful perspectives on dealing with our dissatisfactions and desires to be a different presumably better person. i want to reread this until i have some portions memorized :) very thought-provoking and helpful

    6. Author is a psychiatrist and lay zen teacher. He is just deeply honest about what people seek from zen in particular. His constant emphasis is that seeking is futile. We may change as a result of practice but there is no technique to make change Just Sit. In the moment.

    7. This book had a great message. Too bad the author made me fall asleep every time I picked it up, but I pushed through because it was worth it.

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