La plus grosse poutine du monde

La plus grosse poutine du monde Thomas a peu de souvenirs de sa m re Il se rappelle seulement que pour ses cinq ans elle lui a fait la meilleure poutine au monde Le lendemain elle n tait plus l Elle n est jamais revenue Pour souli

  • Title: La plus grosse poutine du monde
  • Author: Andrée Poulin
  • ISBN: 9782895795674
  • Page: 293
  • Format: Paperback
  • Thomas a peu de souvenirs de sa m re Il se rappelle seulement que pour ses cinq ans, elle lui a fait la meilleure poutine au monde Le lendemain, elle n tait plus l Elle n est jamais revenue Pour souligner ses quatorze ans, Thomas d cide de soumettre une id e aux livre Guinness des records Aid de son meilleur ami Samuel et de son quipe de soccer, il va cuisiner laThomas a peu de souvenirs de sa m re Il se rappelle seulement que pour ses cinq ans, elle lui a fait la meilleure poutine au monde Le lendemain, elle n tait plus l Elle n est jamais revenue Pour souligner ses quatorze ans, Thomas d cide de soumettre une id e aux livre Guinness des records Aid de son meilleur ami Samuel et de son quipe de soccer, il va cuisiner la plus grosse poutine au monde Si son record fait le tour de la plan te, sa m re le saura et elle reviendra Il se met alors en qu te de commanditaires La fromag re accepte de l aider, condition qu il prenne sa fille lie bord du projet Il tente ensuite de convaincre la mairesse que l ar na est l endroit id al pour pr parer les 600 kilos de poutine et servir les consommateurs Mme Tartatcheff n est pas enchant e l id e d y faire entrer de la malbouffe Thomas et ses amis chafaudent les plans les plus fous pour surmonter ces obstacles, mais des r v lations viennent remettre en question le projet Prodigieuse Poutine.

    One thought on “La plus grosse poutine du monde”

    1. Well when I saw this book, having lived and eaten a LOT of Poutine in Canada, I just had to read it. Can I say I'm not in the age group that this book is intended for - ( far from it sadly) but that just makes it more fun for me. Took me back to a time when I like the boy in the book dreamt of that Canadian dish.There's quite a serious undertone to this book - it's quite sad why the boy makes the poutine in the first place but I think it carries a nice message with it. Not a story for locations [...]

    2. Cute, enjoyable, surprisingly emotional book about poutine and a world record attempt. I wish that the book had not ended so abruptly (without spoiling anything, there's something that happens that was built up and then glossed over) but it has a fantastic message and sympathetic and well-developed characters.

    3. Un roman touchant bien que très comique et imagé. Un choix idéal pour les lecteurs difficiles ou en difficulté.

    4. Trying to break a world record Thomas wants to make a 650 kilo poutine with 150 kilos of cheese, 300 kilos of French fries and 200 kilos of gravy to try to get his mother to come back. Then he finds out that his mother is drunk and has a disease called alcoholism and calls it off. After calling it back on he makes the poutine.

    5. A Successful Middle Grade DramedyI sympathize if you sometimes get frustrated by middle grade "problem" books. They can be grim, or tone deaf, or shallow, or cutesy, or just too pat. Well, this book goes right up to the edge once or twice, but it basically succeeds in telling a story with a lot of heart and humor.Our hero is twelve year old Thomas. His Mom just disappeared on his fifth birthday. Dad has become withdrawn and clams up whenever Mom is mentioned. Thomas feels abandoned and adrift. H [...]

    6. The Biggest Poutine in the World by Andrée Poulin is a cute, enjoyable, surprisingly emotional book about poutine and a world record attempt. I wish that the book had not ended so abruptly but it has a fantastic message and sympathetic and well-developed characters.Our hero is twelve year old Thomas. His Mom disappeared on his fifth birthday. Dad has become withdrawn. Thomas feels abandoned. He develops a plan to put together the biggest poutine in the world in the hope that the attention that [...]

    7. Thomas was abandoned on his 5th birthday by his mom. Before she left, she made Thomas poutine for his birthday dinner complete with candles. Thomas hasn't seen her since, but every year gets a card on his birthday. On his 12th birthday, Thomas gets the idea to make the Guinness Book of World Records with the biggest poutine. He enlists help from his neighbors and friends, including Sam and Elie. Thomas thinks if he becomes famous his mom will come back, but really he just wants to know what happ [...]

    8. This was a good middle grade drama. A young boy who's mother left the family when he was only five. He lives with his father, who is angry and depressed and does not show any feelings towards his only son. Thomas is now 12 and remembers that on his last birthday with his mother she made him poutine instead of a birthday cake. He hatches a plan that he thinks will make his father proud of him and bring his mother back into his life. He is going to make the World's Largest Poutine and get into the [...]

    9. I don’t get this – a book with so much going for it – a kid wants his mom to return – she left when he was 5 and now he’s 12 - but he remembers that for his last birthday, she made him a poutine instead of a birthday cake and stuck some candles through the melted cheese, gravy and fries.And now he figures maybe he can attract her attention wherever she might be by setting the Guinness Book of World Records record for the biggest poutine.He gathers friends, finds sponsors the many kilos [...]

    10. I enjoyed this book and loved how honest Thomas was about his feelings of loss and rejection. His sense of missing out on love and affection was so palpable, I wanted to reach in the book and give him a hug. But, the story was also entertaining and very funny in some parts.This could be a good book to read out loud to a 4th or 5th grade class and could spark some great discussions about customs and traditions and regional dishes. It's interesting to learn about poutine and it's relevance in the [...]

    11. Poutine, is a very Canadian thing. It was the first thing I tried to eat when I went there the last time. When it is hot, and fresh, and the curds squeek, as Thomas says in the story, you know it will be good. The dish is french fries with gravy and curds. Sounds odd, but the mix is quite tasty.I bring up this because otherwise you might wonder why Thomas wants to make the biggest one on the world? As Elie, the friend he ends up making, it is like sending a note in a bottle, to find his mother w [...]

    12. I read about "Poutine" in a library trade journal, which deemed it an engaging book for reluctant readers, so I read it myself was impressed. The book is simply written, but not dumbed down and realistically addresses parental alcoholism, divorce, secrets and their impact on families, friendships made despite initial preconceived notions ( Kind of a companion to "Raymie Nightingale", in exploring how kids respond to abandonment by a parent.)All this heavy stuff mixed in with adventure, the silli [...]

    13. This is a short book with very short chapters but it still manages to address some deep topics. It starts out funny as Thomas works to procure hundreds of pounds of french fries and cheese curds as well as a place big enough to set up such a huge dish. But slowly the author brings in more about Thomas' distant father and what has really happened to his mother which is a sad story that leaves Thomas with very real hurt and anger.

    14. I was expecting a much lighter book given the title and bright cover. However, this explores a lot of sensitive topics such as parental absence (real and emotional), alcoholism, takes a community, bullyingl with humour and sensitivity. So glad it's by a Canadian! Such a good read. I really got to love the characters quickly.

    15. Great middle school book about a boy who wants to get into the Guinness Book of World Records to try to get his mother to come back and his father to notice him. Realistic feel to it and although sad in some parts, there's a feeling of hope.

    16. More grit and heart than one might expect. Poulin's characters are flawed and in so being, feel very real. The tale also feels very French-Canadien. It should be read by more people than will read it.

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