The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)

The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore Haworth Gay Lesbian Studies Haworth Gay Lesbian Studies A god transforms into a nymph and enchants another god A king becomes pregnant A prince discovers on his wedding night that he is not a man Another king has children who call him both father and mothe

  • Title: The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
  • Author: Devdutt Pattanaik
  • ISBN: 9781560231813
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Paperback
  • A god transforms into a nymph and enchants another god.A king becomes pregnant.A prince discovers on his wedding night that he is not a man Another king has children who call him both father and mother A hero turns into a eunuch and wears female apparel A princess has to turn into a man before she can avenge her humiliation Widows of a king make love to conceive his c A god transforms into a nymph and enchants another god.A king becomes pregnant.A prince discovers on his wedding night that he is not a man Another king has children who call him both father and mother A hero turns into a eunuch and wears female apparel A princess has to turn into a man before she can avenge her humiliation Widows of a king make love to conceive his child Friends of the same sex end up marrying each other after one of them metamorphoses into a woman These are some of the tales from Hindu lore that this unique book examines The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales from Hindu Lore is a compilation of traditional Hindu stories with a common thread sexual transformation and gender metamorphosis In addition to the thought provoking stories in The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales from Hindu Lore, you ll also find an examination of the universality of queer narratives with examples from Greek lore and Irish folklore a comparison of the Hindu paradigm to the biblical paradigm a look at how Hindu society and Hindu scripture responds to queer sexuality a discussion of the Hijras, popularly believed to be the third gender in India their probable origin, and how they fit into Hindu societyWith the telling of each of these tales, you will also learn how the author came upon each of them and how they relate to the context of dominant Hindu attitudes toward sex, gender, pleasure, fertility, and celibacy.

    One thought on “The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)”

    1. Dr. Devdutt Pattanaik is the author of a number of popular books on Hindu deities and mythology. The Man Who Was a Woman and other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore is a gentle, yet enthralling critical exploration of themes of gender transgression and queer readings of Hindu narratives, ranging from episodes from well-known epics such as Ramayana and Mahabharata to Puranic tales and little-known regional folklore. Thus in The Man Who Was a Woman we encounter women who become men, men who become women, [...]

    2. A very interesting read, though the stuff about the male being the spiritual and the woman being the material got a bit depressing after a while! Interesting points re how translating "asura" as "demon" etc. doesn't quite work, and how dichotomies of good vs. evil don't quite apply because in the Hindu worldview everything partakes of the divine. I'm not sure author's views on gender match mine, or vice versa, but definitely agree with the book's defence of fluidity and queerness.

    3. This book is much more than a folktale collection. It is an academic study of queer elements in Hindu lore, but one that reads like a novel - I enjoyed the writing style tremendously. There are dozens of fascinating stories in the book, selected from scriptures or oral tradition, and all of them come with extensive commentary on their symbolism, meanings, and connections to Hindu mythology as a whole. In fact, this book clarified a whole lot of things for me about Hindu lore that I got wrong bef [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *