Monk's Hood

Monk s Hood Gervase Bonel with his wife and servants is a guest of Shrewsbury Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul when he is suddenly taken ill Luckily the Abbey boasts the services of Brother Cadfael a skill

  • Title: Monk's Hood
  • Author: Ellis Peters
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Gervase Bonel, with his wife and servants, is a guest of Shrewsbury Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul when he is suddenly taken ill Luckily, the Abbey boasts the services of Brother Cadfael, a skilled herbalist Cadfael hurries to the man s bedside, only to be confronted by two very different surprises In Master Bonel s wife, the good monk recognises Richildis, whom heGervase Bonel, with his wife and servants, is a guest of Shrewsbury Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul when he is suddenly taken ill Luckily, the Abbey boasts the services of Brother Cadfael, a skilled herbalist Cadfael hurries to the man s bedside, only to be confronted by two very different surprises In Master Bonel s wife, the good monk recognises Richildis, whom he loved before he took his vows And Master Bonel has been fatally poisoned by a dose of deadly monk s hood oil from Cadfael s herbarium The Sheriff is convinced that the murderer is Richildis son Edwin, but Cadfael is certain of her son s innocence Using his knowledge of both herbs and the human heart, Cadfael deciphers a deadly recipe for murder

    One thought on “Monk's Hood”

    1. I read this for the “Murder Most Foul” square of my 2017 Halloween Bingo card.Brother Cadfael has not disappointed me yet. In this book, one of his herbal potions is used for evil instead of for good and the Brother feels he must right the wrong caused by his tincture. A very young step-son is blamed for the murder and since Cadfael is sure the boy is innocent, he pursues the matter all the way to Wales.Cadfael is such a steady, sensible character. It’s a joy to watch as he methodically pu [...]

    2. I really, really liked the book, but I LOVE Cadfael. Cadfael gets ten stars. These books may be classified as stand-alones,but I believe you should read them in order, starting with the second book. Why? Because it is important to know who each one of the characters really is, their souls, what makes them tick, how they think and behave. In book two I came to understand who Beringar was. Book three has now taught me, showed me, who Cadfael is. I have seen the choices he makes, and I absolutely l [...]

    3. In the third of the Brother Cadfael mysteries, one Gervase Bonel leaves his estate to the Abbey in exchange for him and his wife being looked after for life, in the process disinheriting his stepson. Not long after moving in, Bonel is killed by poison in a special dish sent out for him by the Abbey and the poison is an oil for joint pain prepared by Brother Cadfael. The most of obvious suspect is Bonel’s stepson, fifteen-year-old Edwin Gurney who turns out to be the son of Cadfael’s old swee [...]

    4. This is a yeoman's work mystery with a middle ages veil draped over it. Seriously, Ellis Peters' Monk's Hood felt like a throwaway whodunnit set in the medieval period. I know these are very popular, popular enough to have a tv series made from them, but I just don't see it. The whole thing could've been done in any setting at any time. Being that this is the only book in the Cadfael series I've read, with no plans on reading more at this point, I'd be happy to hear from any fans that are willin [...]

    5. Excellent! As always, Brother Cadfael's wisdom shines through in this mystery. He does not rush to conclusions or believe coincidences but muddles through what clues there are to find the truth. And being a Brother, his opinion of the culprit isn't always as harsh as those of the law, compassion playing a large part in his decision.The author does a wonderful job of putting the reader into the 12th century and uses dialogue that might have reflected that time period as well. These stories are a [...]

    6. I have a feeling that this series will be like the The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series for me. Every book is solid, they give you the warm, cozy feeling, you enjoy the atmosphere and the immersion into another time and/or place, and what more can you say? I almost feel this series would be stronger without the murder mystery aspect. I really enjoy feeling like I'm right there in the 12th century, working with Brother Cadfael and his herbs and potions. He is a decent man, and the book is ki [...]

    7. Another day, another Cadfael book read! Apparently I'm addicted. It only took 2 and a Kindle Unlimited trial.This had a really good story, bustling central mystery and memorable characters. I particularly liked the exploration of the recklessness of youth, and how we have to live with the consequences of hasty or poor decisions made. I also love the touches of Welsh culture and history in these books - missed it in book 2. Will totally read the next one.

    8. When Brother Cadfael is called to the bedside of a dying man, he makes some startling discoveries. First, the man was poisoned, by means of a unique blend of monkshood and other substances, which was formulated by Cadfael himself. Second, the man's wife is none other than the woman Cadfael once loved, before he went off to the Crusades. When her son is accused of the crime, she begs Cadfael for help.I saw the whodunit coming right away, but it was still fun to see Cadfael piece the facts togethe [...]

    9. (third reading: May 2016)“Every time I come near you I find myself compounding a felony.”One of the best of the twenty chronicles. I am not one to judge the merits of murder mysteries, but as historical fiction this takes the reader right into the history and culture of twelfth century England and Wales. Improves with subsequent readings.“What seems to be an easy life in contemplation can be hard enough when it comes to reality.”Along the way Pargeter treats us to multiple suspects, blin [...]

    10. The third in the Cadfael series. Once again a treat and a pleasure to read, even for someone who's familiar with the television series. The books are more richly realized and the characters more well drawn. The plots are bit more complex with the televised version being simplified to fit in the available time-slot. Once again the book contains characters that never made it to the TV program and this time was much funnier than the series ever was. This was mostly due to the younger age of the sus [...]

    11. I enjoy these books. I like Brother Cadfael, I like the setting of a Benedictine abbey, and I like the simpler times. I also like how it makes no bones of the fact that human nature is timeless (kind of hard to - since these books are murder mysteries). This book is no exception. Actually, it was an exception in the sense that I didn't really get on board with Cadfael's confidence in the end. But I'll let it slide, because I love these books anyway. Another thing that always strikes me when I re [...]

    12. Having kind of read this series backwards (or, you know, in no particular order at all), it's fun to go back to the earliest ones and see what changed later on. Monk's-Hood might be the most standard whodunit in the whole series, with Brother Cadfael taking a pretty active "detective" role. There's no love story, no spunky girl who turns out to have the most brains and courage of anybody, and if there's maybe one more convenient coincidence than is necessarywell, that's okay. I thoroughly enjoye [...]

    13. Another excellent Cadfael mystery, this finds one of Cadfael's potions used by someone else to poison Gervase Bonel, a wealthy man who is in the process of leaving his manor to the Abbey in Shrewsbury; that abbey which Cadfael calls home. Cadfael and his novice assistant, Brother Mark, must try to solve the murder. Added to the storyline, the wife of the dead man was once betrothed to Cadfael many years ago, during a time before Cadfael became a Benedictine monk. As well, the old Prior of the Sh [...]

    14. This is the best of the series so far. I love Father Cadfael; his outlook, his thoughts.everything about him. This mystery brought out some interesting facts of law in the medieval times of England and Wales. I enjoy how Ellis Peters brings out the history and village life-styles. The murder in this book is interesting and the book kept me thinking about circumstances throughout.

    15. My first venture into the Brother Cadfael mystery series, and a delightful entry into the medieval world of England and Wales in the mid Twelfth century. Brother Cadfael, a Benedictine monk at the Shrewsbury Abbey is committed to the upkeep of the herb gardens and medicine workshop in his charge. His placid and contented existence in the Abbey is suddenly disrupted, when the Abbot takes in a guest, Gervase Bonel, his wife and household to lead a retired life, with every need taken care off in re [...]

    16. Gervase Bonel has bequeathed his manor in Wales to Shrewsbury Abbey, cutting his stepson out of what was to be his and sends him packing to his sister and her coffin maker husband in Shrewsbury. Meanwhile, Abbott Heribert has been called to attend the legatine council, and has been instructed that until he is confirmed as Abbott or a replacement is named, that no business can be finalisedwhich leaves Gervase Bonel's bequest incomplete.Bonel with his wife and servants, still takes up residence in [...]

    17. This is one of the few mysteries that really relies on the setting for its plot. It just wouldn’t work anywhere else, and I’m not referring to the Abby setting. I won’t say more about that for fear of giving it away.There were some really good parts in this story. There is something so true to life about the conflict between Jerome, Prior Robert and just about everyone. That made for some maddening and hilarious moments. (view spoiler)[ I can’t say I really liked the ending. Well, the en [...]

    18. "We are all both the victims and the heirs of our fellow men."This instalment of Brother Cadfeal is all about the relationships between fathers and their sons, and how this relationship can be extended and poisoned. Oh, yes, and there's a murder. But the culprit is more than a man, it is the financial embitterment which deforms the paternal born between a medieval nobleman and his change.In this novel, England and Wales are again drawn in stark contrast to each other, as alien in terms of econom [...]

    19. Respite from the civil war between Maud and Stephen, however temporary, has been restored to Shrewsbury as Christmas approaches. Life in the abbey proceeds as usual when suddenly Brother Cadfael is called to the bedside of Gervase Bonel, who has recently nearly completed the process of turning over his lands to the abbey in return for a guaranteed living under its care. To make matters more interesting, Bonel's wife--to Cadfael's complete surprise ins none other than Cadfael's first love, Richil [...]

    20. Now that I've finished Monk's Hood, I have found a new appreciation for Ellis Peters' work. After one death too many, I was expecting a rather static setting that would seem to change, but in truth, it would really change from book to book. I am definitely the product of watching too many American sitcoms and am glad my expectation was not met.The story begins with Father Abbot Heribert leaving Shrewsbury to a council being held to reassess the leadership of the Church in England. He believes is [...]

    21. This next wonderful offering in the Brother Cadfael series sees Cadfael encountering his past and also brings the culture of neighboring Wales--still a distinct country with its own laws, customs, and rulers--to the forefront.Brother Cadfael (pronounced Cad-file) has definitely entered the ranks of great fiction detectives alongside Sherlock Holmes and Lord Peter Wimsey. But these stories are more than just murder mysteries in medieval drag. Ellis Peters actually lived in Shrewsbury, England, wh [...]

    22. I first came across Cadfael many years ago through the ITV series starring Derek Jacobi. Normally I don’t mention the tv shows or movies that inspired me to read a book as it doesn’t seem relevant to my reviews. In this case I happened to get an audiobook version which was read by Derek and while I loved the book, the fact that the audio version brought back great memories of the show is not to be denied.Abbot Heribert is called away to account for his management of the abbey. In his absence [...]

    23. I was intrigued about the idea of a murder mystery set in the 12th century. Having just listened to an audio book about the history of English crime fiction, whose author stated that crime fiction required a few things, one of which was an authority to resolve the crime. In this case, the sheriff provided that function, and I'm sure if I could recall the other criteria, Peters would also have placed them feasibly into this story.Cadfael is a monk, contentedly providing medications to residents o [...]

    24. I really enjoyed this book. Historical fiction is some of my favorite books to read. This was number three in the series and my first Cadfael book I've read, but reading the previous two wasn't necessary to figure out what was going on. I've since ordered book one and two off amazon to catch up on the story so far. This is a HUGE series I like the character of Cadfael a monk who once served in the crusades a herbalist who uses his medieval remedies to serve the local town of Shrewsbury but is ca [...]

    25. I've a feeling I slip into the same sort of review for every Cadfael book. Because the books are largely the same, and that is what makes them enjoyable, but stops them every surprising. They are consistent. So in this one, there's a murder, and the ever steady and resourceful Cadfael finds out who dunnit, and dispenses wise and kind justice to all. The wicked get comeuppance, the good receive their reward, and the pompous get taken down a peg. Yeah, as happens in every book. But the plots are i [...]

    26. I'm a Brother Cadfael fan, I won't belabor the point of this book except to say two things and they might seem obvious, but these are deeper books than you might expect. Plus I wish I could experience at least briefly, the twelfth-century. I like a book that makes me look up archaic words. 1. Statistically it would seem that being in the environs of Shrewsbury during the reign of King Stephen might not be in your best interest. 2. As long as you keep on the straight and narrow, Brother Cadfael i [...]

    27. This series never fails to delight me. Cadfael is such a fabulous character, and the stories are so details and well written that even re-reading them is an enormous pleasure. In this book, Cadfael discovers a lady love from his youth is living just outside of the abbey when he is called to the bedside of her dying husband. But when it is discovered that her husband has been poisoned, and with a poison mixed in Cadfael's very own workshop, he just has to get involved. I love how human he is, and [...]

    28. Yet another solid and quality installment in the Cadfael series, with loveable scamps and tortured murderers driven to acts outside their nature. Cadfael himself is as delightful as always, a monk more hippie with his modern views on love, justice, and living morally. The historical detail rings authentic as always; Peters' research and flair for recreating the long past is impressive. This is a series that delights no matter how many times I read it.

    29. Classically wonderful mystery set at shrewsbury abbey. And performed by Derek Jacobi. What could be better?Cadfael investigates the poisoning death of the husband of a woman he had lived as a young man. Mistaken identities. Trickery. Herbalism. And of course the mystery is solved.

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