The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction

The Tudors A Very Short Introduction First published as part of the best selling The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain John Guy s Very Short Introduction to The Tudors is the most authoritative short introduction to this age in Brit

  • Title: The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: John Guy
  • ISBN: 9780192854018
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • First published as part of the best selling The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain, John Guy s Very Short Introduction to The Tudors is the most authoritative short introduction to this age in British history It offers a compelling account of the political, religious and economic changes of the country under such leading monarchs as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I The workFirst published as part of the best selling The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain, John Guy s Very Short Introduction to The Tudors is the most authoritative short introduction to this age in British history It offers a compelling account of the political, religious and economic changes of the country under such leading monarchs as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I The work has been substantially revised and updated for this edition In particular, the reigns of Henry VII, Edward VI, and Philip and Mary are comprehensively reassessed.

    One thought on “The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. I found this to be a very useful and informative refresher on Tudor history. It's not quite accurate to describe it as a "refresher"; there was a heck of a lot of information here that I didn't know before. I was most surprised to find out that Elizabeth I was actually not all that powerful and was largely controlled and manipulated by her male advisers.

    2. The idea behind this "brief insight series" is great--give readers a quick, intelligent hit on a big subject in a boiled-down textbook format. Unfortunately Guy is a dull, elliptical writer who seems bored with and dismissive of his subject. (With a curt wrist flick he dispenses with the Six Wives of Henry VIII, for example, by saying a lot has already been written on this.) He treats the rise and fall of Cromwell as little more than a box score. Frustratingly several large charts eat up a lot o [...]

    3. The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions #20), John GuyJohn Guy's Very Short Introduction to The Tudors is the most authoritative short introduction to this age in British history. It offers a compelling account of the political, religious and economic changes of the country under such leading monarchs as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The work has been substantially revised and updated for this edition. In particular, the reigns of Henry VII, Edward VI, and Philip and Mary a [...]

    4. A romp through historyThe Very Short Introduction series from Oxford University Press began in 1995 and now lists more than 300 titles, according to this book’s blurb. I’ve seen positive (and not so positive) reviews of several of the titles, but this is the first one I’ve read. I thought that starting with a subject I’m familiar with would give me an opportunity to see how well the book captures the essentials.First off, the book is not only Very Short but also very small – with a ver [...]

    5. I'm not sure who this book is supposed to be for. You can tell from its dry opening chapter focusing on economics and population statistics that it isn't the light, breezy history you might've guessed from its size (and subhead: "A Brief Insight"), yet it's far too short to offer the kind of context that would make such dry information compelling. It goes into enormous detail in some places (price of cutlery during the Tudor era, anyone?) and then barely even touches on Henry VIII's wives. A lit [...]

    6. So far, great. Realistically, its more of a history book, but people that know me know I love, love, LOVE the Tudor era. I really love all history pertaining to English Monarchy but the Tudor era is my favorite - from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I.

    7. I found this book very interesting. It went into details I hadn't heard before. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in Tudor England.

    8. Review - I wouldn't really recommend this book if you have an in-depth knowledge of the Tudors, as it is quite simplified in places. However, saying that, it would be excellent for those looking for an overview of the period i.e. students and those just developing an interest in the topic. John Guy has written countless books on the Tudors, so is probably the right person to do this introduction. I do think that it lacks in several places - the six wives of Henry VIII are barely given a page bet [...]

    9. A friend noted this was on sale for Kindle and I picked it up. It's a quick overview of the Tudor dynasty (Henry VII to Elizabeth I). Mostly my knowledge of these monarchs is through the lens of Church history. This is a secular historian's perspective, though much of the source material is the same (Guy is a little kinder to Mary, and I don't think I knew much of her husband Philip)

    10. This book is part of a series offering, as the title suggests, a very short introduction to a wide variety of different topics. This one is devoted to the Tudors and takes us through the reigns of each Tudor monarch - Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, (briefly) Lady Jane Grey, Mary I and Elizabeth I. All of the basic facts are here, presented in a format that is easy to follow and understand. There are also some illustrations, genealogical tables, a chronology and a list of suggested further rea [...]

    11. Really excellent little book which does what it says it will: introduces you to the Tudors. I especially liked the story of Bosworth on opening pages and the section on Mary. With scant knowledge of her reign, this proves a good starting point. More than burnings, pseudo-pregnancies and Calais. I enjoyed the section on Bess (of course) and found it interesting to glean Guy's views here (of her losing her grip in the final decade). Especially liked his barbed description of Essex as "dazzling but [...]

    12. This brief, and almost concise book about the Tudors is a good introduction to their world. It covered the reign of Henry VIII to Elizabeth I, along with economic and political summaries of their rule. Of course Elizabeth I gets the spotlight in this book, covering brief economic, political, and the arts. How her rule changed the dynamics of the English throne. Even though the language in this book is not friendly, for me reading it felt like I was reading a textbook than like those pop-books li [...]

    13. I found this book via a reference in the Wall Street Journal at a time I was cruising through the trashy Showtime series, The Tudors, on Prime. It is a pretty succinct version of the political and social forces at work at the time and was actually a good complement to the surprisingly accurate TV series. The book could have benefited from a bit more sex and violence and the TV series might have been better with improved historical flow. But together they made an entertaining and informative pac [...]

    14. Short review: This is a middle of the pack book from the Very Short Introduction series. It avoids the biggest problem of talking about the scholarship and not the subject. Except for two chapters at the end that talk about the influence of the era on the arts, this is straight narrative history. Mostly focused on succession, war, taxes, and economics. The reformation is not talked about more than necessary (but the VSI book on the Reformation is good.)My full review is on my blog at bookwi/tudo [...]

    15. While I appreciated the photographs and concept of including brief snippets of the Tudor reign, I found much of it hard to follow. After reading Alison Weir, I thought this would be a nice refresher, but Guy writes without contextualizing what he is referring to which left me feeling lost. Some of the context that we are given seems impulsive and unnecessary.

    16. This is a good introduction to the Tudor period, a well written and balanced account of the period, debunking some of the myths that surround the monarchs of that period as well as a good account of the foreign policies of the time.

    17. Though the Tudors must easily be the most well-worn through period of English history, the author uses the little space he has very effectively to cast fresh light on familiar ground. (And no, I'm not competing in 'most clichés in one sentence' contest, despite appearances.)

    18. The Very Short Introduction strikes again, as John Guy wittily summarizes a century of Tudor rule, with useful bibliography, historiographical information and willingness to puncture pernicious mythology.

    19. To have read this book for a class, I can actually say that I really enjoyed it. As a history major, with a focus in British history, this book offers such easy-to-read, story-like information. Even though the book is tiny, don't despair, it is thorough and very detailed.

    20. I think this was the most interesting era so far.Though it was very short and brief but it made me eager to learn more about this era in history.The characters were very interesting!Can't wait to see them again in the Story of Civilization!

    21. I read this in connection with a course. It served well for orientation, but it's much too short to be useful for anything more than that.

    22. One of the better VSIs: just gives a basic narrative, interwoven with some basic analysis and historiography. A very good, very short intro.

    23. While I learned a bit about England during the 1500's I think I really need an Introduction to this introduction to fill in the knowledge that the author supposes I already have (but I don't).

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