What Your Financial Advisor Isn’t Telling You: The 10 Essential Truths You Need to Know About Your Money

What Your Financial Advisor Isn t Telling You The Essential Truths You Need to Know About Your Money A highly readable personal finance book that translates financial jargon and enables readers to ask the tough questions to protect their money and their financial well being In today s unsettled finan

  • Title: What Your Financial Advisor Isn’t Telling You: The 10 Essential Truths You Need to Know About Your Money
  • Author: Liz Davidson
  • ISBN: 9780544602304
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A highly readable personal finance book that translates financial jargon and enables readers to ask the tough questions to protect their money and their financial well being In today s unsettled financial markets, where most pension plans died out with the twentieth century and where no one s certain of the future of Social Security, hardworking people turn to financial adA highly readable personal finance book that translates financial jargon and enables readers to ask the tough questions to protect their money and their financial well being In today s unsettled financial markets, where most pension plans died out with the twentieth century and where no one s certain of the future of Social Security, hardworking people turn to financial advisors to guide them to a worry free financial lifestyle But do you really know how to find a legitimate financial advisor Do you understand the jargon advisors use to explain your investments And most important, do you know the answers to the most critical questions that will affect your financial future how much are advisors fees, and just how safe are the investment choices they make on your behalf Now than ever, you need to educate yourself to prepare for your future, whether it s buying a house, paying for college, or saving for retirement Spending quality time with What Your Financial Advisor Isn t Telling You is the first step to getting on track.This book is a comprehensive guide to the essential unbiased information you need to make smart personal finance decisions and achieve total financial wellness.

    One thought on “What Your Financial Advisor Isn’t Telling You: The 10 Essential Truths You Need to Know About Your Money”

    1. Excellent, realistic financial information told in an engaging and easy to understand way. I have read many other good financial guidance books and this is a strong entry into that category, but it also means that there was not really anything new here as good financial advice really does not change. Always good to be reminded of the principles though, and perhaps eventually I will find the courage to follow those pieces of advice that I have been, thus far, reluctant to adopt.

    2. Even as a financial planner, I learned several things that have helped take the guidance I give people to a whole new level. I love it because I can recommend this book to anyone and know that they'll find value. I'm excited to start my Financial Independence Day group!

    3. I do not have anywhere near enough money to warrant a financial adviser, but this books was invaluable in learning how to better manage my money. Davidson's advice makes so much sense. In essence, she suggests maxing out your tax-favorable employee benefits (401k, HSA/FSA, etc.) and then paying yourself (paying off high-interested debt, emergency savings, and the like) before you even THINK about going to an outside advisor with your hard earned dollars. She goes into depth about why these thing [...]

    4. I picked up this book after landing my first job with a livable salary. I was intimidated. Building an emergency fund was daunting: how could I save enough? Saving for retirement was terrifying: how could I weigh all these variables and manage to make the right decision? This book gives you information that helps you make smarter choices about your money, whether you have a lot or a little of it. I found the whole thing empowering, and I'm not exaggerating when I say I was so energized that I re [...]

    5. As a first step to conquering my personal finances and setting up a more solid foundation for my future, I decided to read Liz's book and was not disappointed! I learned a lot about what I need to know if and when I decided to get an advisor. I also learned that I am not alone with being confused and there's a lot of work to do on a national level to get Americans in a better place with their money.

    6. Basic boiler plate stuff, author and financial educator Liz Davidson peppers her book with examples from real clients (just the names changed to protect the financially insolvent) which always improves a read. She offers some radical and tells you they are strategies to save a ton and retire early. Of course, it's nice if you're making a ton. I do what I love but the money has never followed.She is hard on financial professionals even though she admits most are honest. At least her horror storie [...]

    7. Invest in mutual funds that have low fees. Morningstar found low fees to be the single best indicator of superior future perfomrnace-better even than its own star ratings! Warren Buffet suggests to invest in index funds. Look for mutual funds with low turnover. Holding investments longer than a year in certain categories will allow them to be taxed as capital gains which is significantly less than ordinary income tax. Maximize full tax savings. Financial Stress is one of the biggest stressors on [...]

    8. I found this the first of what I'll call the "post-Madoff" investment guides for beginning and intermediate level investors. It's pretty basic stuff, and much about the basics of personal finance. But when Davidson gets to investments and planning, instead of playing the total "do it yourself" card or the "you need a team of professionals" saw, Davidson describes when and why you might need that advisor and how to pick a trustworthy one that won't pyramid-scheme away your wealth. A bit of that a [...]

    9. This book takes a rational look at the conflicts of interest inherent in giving financial advice. The author makes a pretty convincing case that hourly fee-only advice is most likely the most efficient. The fact that no one can make a living on that payment model suggests that what most people get out of financial advisors is a false sense of security. There are probably some people who really can't hold on to money and need a decent advisor (I think many pro athletes fall into this category). T [...]

    10. I got this as a giveaway.This is a pretty good introduction to better handling your finances, covering a broad range with just enough detail to make you feel comfortable about it and giving you more resources for you to further your knowledge if you want to. If you already are into the personal finance scene, this book might be a bit too basic for you, but there is a nice checklist in the back about the steps you should take to get your finances in order and plenty of stories of other people an [...]

    11. If one was only going to read a single finance and money book this probably is not the one. However, Liz Davidson does a very good job outlining the problems encountered with various types of financial advisors and brokers. One section was subtitled; Fast Food Finance: Would You Like Lies With That. She also explains what the various types and certifications of financial professionals mean. All those letters after names like CFP and CIMA are explained.There were parts that dragged and repeated b [...]

    12. This book is really a good primer for investors of any level. It is not big on numbers, but the narrative is easy to read and understand. A lot of this I already knew, but this was written well for the novice. I especially liked the chapters on Your Life Partner May Be Your Worst Enemy. I will be suggesting my kids to read this chapter. It still did not convince me that I need an investment advisor, but that has more to do with my hesitancy to trust others with my money.This was a GoodReads and [...]

    13. I enjoyed this book as it provided some insight in helping me to find and select a financial advisor who I could trust. While this book was helpful in pointing out how to find an advisor, it did not provide as much information as I would have liked. I feel like she talked around some of the issues and did not go into enough depth. This book is a great starting off point, but I think more books will need to be read in order for me to get a full picture.

    14. Good overall summary of specifics and pitfalls of working with a financial advisor. Not a whole lot I hadn't known before, but certainly a good introduction to the issues and also a good refresher. One particularly good idea is to schedule a "financial independence day" in which you (and your spouse or partner) schedule a full day to organize and think in depth about where you are in your financial affairs, where you would like to be, and how to get there

    15. I won a copy of this book in a giveaway. Since I can use any free financial advice I was interested in this book. This book is geared towards a full-time employee with company retirement benefits rather than the self-employed. What I especially liked are the the checklists and Facebook articles that are posted several times each week.

    16. One of the more thorough and detailed book with plenty of good explanation about what you should be doing with your money. Wish I had read this at 22.

    17. Some things I liked about this one:* advice on when and how to choose a financial adviser* emphasizes the advantage of using what's available through your employer first

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