The Seasons: Death and Transfiguration

The Seasons Death and Transfiguration As a novelist concerned with issues of gender social class and ethnicity Jo Sinclair has won coveted literary prizes and a devoted following Now in this extraordinary memoir she relates a tale as

  • Title: The Seasons: Death and Transfiguration
  • Author: Jo Sinclair
  • ISBN: 9781558610569
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As a novelist concerned with issues of gender, social class, and ethnicity, Jo Sinclair has won coveted literary prizes and a devoted following Now in this extraordinary memoir, she relates a tale as fascinating and moving as any work of fiction.In this unique instance of Sinclair s storytelling, she tells the story of her Jewish working class life through the prism of anAs a novelist concerned with issues of gender, social class, and ethnicity, Jo Sinclair has won coveted literary prizes and a devoted following Now in this extraordinary memoir, she relates a tale as fascinating and moving as any work of fiction.In this unique instance of Sinclair s storytelling, she tells the story of her Jewish working class life through the prism of an intense relationship with a middle class Anglo married women, into whose house she moves so that she might write her books Helen Buchman gives Sinclair a room of her own and persuades her to eschew alcohol for gardening and to believe in herself.

    One thought on “The Seasons: Death and Transfiguration”

    1. I adore Sinclair's novel, The Wasteland, for its awesome portrayal of a lesbian and for its astute psychological insights. When I learned that Sinclair had a memoir, I was delighted. The Seasons is part of the Feminist Press memoir series and it is a moving story about the death of Sinclair's lover, though the relationship is never drawn explicitly. Helen Buchman is the confidante, patron, and intimate of Jo Sinclair/Ruth Seid, who makes Sinclair's work possible and meaningful. Written largely a [...]

    2. The seasons are, of course, a metaphor for the course of lives, both the narrator's and the woman she loves who dies too young. But any reader who loves plants and knows the hard, dirty work required to garden will be fascinated. For Jo/Ruth, gardening is not a hobby, but life-saving therapy. Her depiction of Helen's illness and death was deeply moving.

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