Palefire

Palefire Everyone hates Darren the firebug the bad boy trouble follows everywhere Alison finds a warmth to Darren a spark everyone s missing Alison knows what she s doing but after tonight s fireworks she

  • Title: Palefire
  • Author: M.K. Reed Farel Dalrymple
  • ISBN: 9780988814974
  • Page: 178
  • Format: Paperback
  • Everyone hates Darren, the firebug, the bad boy trouble follows everywhere Alison finds a warmth to Darren, a spark everyone s missing Alison knows what she s doing, but after tonight s fireworks, she ll find out who knows best Can Alison play with fire without getting burned Palefire, the first collaboration between writer MK Reed and artist Farel Dalrymple, takes us bEveryone hates Darren, the firebug, the bad boy trouble follows everywhere Alison finds a warmth to Darren, a spark everyone s missing Alison knows what she s doing, but after tonight s fireworks, she ll find out who knows best Can Alison play with fire without getting burned Palefire, the first collaboration between writer MK Reed and artist Farel Dalrymple, takes us back to high school for a hot date to the party of the year When you re not a girl, and not yet a woman, the last thing you want is advice The road to hell may be paved with good intentions, but everyone deserves a second chance even if it goes up in flames.Farel Dalrymple is the author of the New York Times bestseller, The Wrenchies First Second He has also collaborated with author Jonathan Lethem Motherless Brooklyn, The Fortress of Solitude on Omega the Unknown Marvel Comics His comic, Pop Gun War, was a Xeric Grant recipient and gold medal winner from the Society of Illustrators He is a co founder of the comic anthology, Meathaus Reed is the author of the graphic novels Americus and The Cute Girl Network First Second Her work can be found in anthologies like Papercutter, The Big Feminist But, and the Swedish magazine Galago Americus was the winner of NAIBA s 2012 Carla Cohen Free Speech Award and was a 2011 American Booksellers for Children s New Voices title.

    One thought on “Palefire”

    1. A short story written by MK Reed (Americus) and illustrated by Farel Dalrymple (The Wrenches, Pop Gun War) about a small town high school party where Alison seems to have few choices between potential suitors, but of course chooses the local firebug Darren against everyone's advice. The dialogue is usually sharp and realistic. It's a story, and short, sort of slice of life, that seems both concise and affecting. Not much happens, but what does I think would be quite appealing to teens. I liked i [...]

    2. So my lesson from this book is all these guys are assholes who treat Alison like shit and she finds it charming? And they keep calling her idiotic? That's pretty useless.

    3. Reed really manages to capture the stubborn sulkiness that can often be found in teens, but it's a slim story and I definitely wanted more. Certain panels were really excellent, like the crowd scene at the party, though some of the facial expressions throughout were a little lackluster.

    4. I really wanted to like this book. It's been floating around for a couple of months and whenever I happen to spot it on the shelves I think, "I really need to read that." I seem to remember reading some great reviews of it.I did not like this book. I wanted more. More story, more layers, more character development. More.The art wasn't my style. I'm not saying that it was bad but it wasn't anything that I enjoyed. A couple of frames were beautiful and perfect but I would consider it about 15% of [...]

    5. This is a pretty slight slice of life story about a girl and her night out with a bad boy. It feels a lot like the tropes you'd see in every high school coming of age movie played out, although the language and behavior does avoid some of the worst cliches. The artwork is serviceable but not memorable; the font for the dialog is a hand-lettered style that feels amateur, and aside from the nice cover art, it's all black and white. It feels a bit like an episode off of a teen drama show (albeit on [...]

    6. The cover grabbed me and I was excited that it was illustrated by Farel Dalrumple (Wretches), beyond that though, this graphic novel wasn't much to write home about. Palefire is basically a glimpse into a night of a high school girl's night as she grapples with the fact that no one likes Darren, a firebug, teenage arsonist that no one cares for. She thinks there is more than meets the eye so she blows off all the advice and bails on her best friend's party so she can hang out with this misunders [...]

    7. A short graphic novel about a girl in high school who likes a boy who her friends don't like. It takes place on a single night of a party, and the reader just kind of observes the small events that happen without narrative guidance or much of a framework. It builds a little, but it's a short story more than anything larger.

    8. It's hard to place how I feel about this book - on one hand, it's a pretty accurate representation of how a party night can take you places you didn't really plan on going but on the other, there was no real resolution or point to the story which might be the whole point I guess? I'll just mark this one down as a slice of life experience.

    9. This is a short, quiet book about one night in a teen girl's life, fighting everyone about the boy she wants to date, and then realizing that everyone was right to begin with. I loved Alison's attitude and could totally relate to her attraction to the "bad boy." The art was a little off-putting for me, but the writing was strong enough to make up for that.

    10. I really liked this story about a high school party. A girl who goes looking for love in all the wrong places; but her true love (or at least friendship) comes to find her when she really needs him. The dialogue between the mother, daughter and all of the teenagers is realistic and the drawings are well done. This is a fun, quick read.

    11. I liked this. I felt like it was only the first chapter of a graphic novel, but I liked it. I hope there is more coming. And I know that many teenagers speak like this, but I got tired of reading the curse words.

    12. Not a lot going on in this story (though the writing is pretty good for the minimal amount of stuff that does occur), and Dalrymple's art (which was the main reason I picked this up) felt like a bit of a letdown here after Wrenchies.

    13. Not sure what the point of this was? Definitely perpetuated some casual misogyny. Just a heads up. But the artwork was good and the writing was all dialogue and pretty realistic.

    14. 2.5 out of 5. It's a well-done, small, contained narrative. Feels a bit too short and heavy on the sad realism, so I didn't readily take to it.

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