The Extraordinary Suzy Wright: A Colonial Woman on the Frontier

The Extraordinary Suzy Wright A Colonial Woman on the Frontier Children are taught much about the men who shaped early America but history shaping colonial women remain largely unknown and undiscussed The Extraordinary Suzy Wright sets about to change that tell

  • Title: The Extraordinary Suzy Wright: A Colonial Woman on the Frontier
  • Author: Teri Kanefield
  • ISBN: 9781419718663
  • Page: 407
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Children are taught much about the men who shaped early America, but history shaping colonial women remain largely unknown and undiscussed The Extraordinary Suzy Wright sets about to change that, telling the little known story of Quaker Susanna Suzy Wright 1697 1784 , a renowned poet and political activist Suzy helped settle the Pennsylvania frontier, where she actedChildren are taught much about the men who shaped early America, but history shaping colonial women remain largely unknown and undiscussed The Extraordinary Suzy Wright sets about to change that, telling the little known story of Quaker Susanna Suzy Wright 1697 1784 , a renowned poet and political activist Suzy helped settle the Pennsylvania frontier, where she acted as legal counselor to her less literate neighbors, preparing wills, deeds, indentures, and other contracts Surviving documents and correspondence between Suzy and a host of her contemporaries including Benjamin Franklin James Logan, Pennsylvania s governor and chief justice and a few signers of the Declaration of Independence reveal that Suzy, from her home on the frontier, exerted considerable influence in the highest circles of Pennsylvania government This fascinating and inspiring story includes an author s note, bibliography, and index.

    One thought on “The Extraordinary Suzy Wright: A Colonial Woman on the Frontier”

    1. Oh, how I wish this book had existed when I was a student in elementary school! I can remember asking my fourth grade teacher where all the women were in our history books. What were they doing and why were they absent from the stories we were reading about great moments in history? If I'd read this book back then, I'd have been thrilled to point to Suzy Wright as one of the movers and shakers of colonial America. Not only did she leave behind the family home in Lancashire to move across the oce [...]

    2. Suzy Wright accomplished incredible feats in the 1700s, during a time when women held little power. Remaining unmarried throughout her life, she owned her own home and vast holdings along the Susquehanna River. Her Quaker background influenced her strong belief in equality amongst all people. This translated into her desire for women to have the same opportunities to vote as men. She practiced law, wrote poetry, became a business women and scientist raising silk worms, and producing silk skeins [...]

    3. There are plenty of biographies of leaders and military people from the colonial period that were men. It's refreshing to read the biography of a woman from that time period. Suzy Wright came to the colonies from England with her family at age 16, in 1714. They settled in Pennsylvania, which was founded for and by Quakers, and the family became active participants in the intellectual and social circles of Quaker life there. Suzy apparently was an amazingly accomplished autodidact. Her knowledge [...]

    4. Until the end of the book in the author's note, there's literally no context for the "why" of this book. We get a collection of anecdotes about Wright and her influence in early Pennsylvania and the surprising freedom she had, in part because she was an unmarried Quaker woman. Which, the stories are fine, but there's zero thread holding them together, and worse, the design of this book is a mess. It's a larger size, like a picture book, and it's clear there's not enough text to support the size. [...]

    5. I'm happy I read this middle-grade nonfiction volume on Suzy Wright, a woman who made a name for herself in Colonial America. This book serves an important curricular need in my classroom and it presents information accessibly. Suzy Wright was a jill-of-all-trades on the colonial frontier: a lawyer, a poet, an advisor, and a stateswoman of sorts. One of the issues in telling her story is the lack of primary source materials available, both because not many of Suzy's letters still exist, and, as [...]

    6. I'm dead smack in the middle of giving it 3.5 or 4 stars. Kanefield does a nice job of introducing young readers to a part of history that is generally unexplored in juvenile history-women in colonial America. Suzy Wright was an exceptional woman and this was the first time I ever heard about her. Kanefield's highlighting of Wright's accomplishment showcases Wright's influence in Colonial America, especially for a woman. I think my only complaint was that I really wanted more. However, this is n [...]

    7. This is a "must purchase" for any library with students covering the colonial period and Revolutionary War. I had never heard of Suzy Wright but she was considered the most accomplished and brilliant woman of her time in Philadelphia. Suzy refused all marriage offers knowing that it would impede her freedom to make decisions and own property. She had the ear of Benjamin Franklin and advised him on local matters, she acted as legal counsel in her county and advocated for her Native American neigh [...]

    8. I've long been fascinated with Martha Ballard, an eighteenth century midwife, and Suzy Wright shines as another woman on the colonial frontier. A poet, lawyer, land owner, and silk grower, she never married. Her single status, her frontier location, and her family's Quaker respect for education and equality afforded Suzy opportunities that she took full and capable advantage of. Author Kanefield traces what is known about Suzy Wright and places it in context. The resulting text reminds readers t [...]

    9. My favorite quote from this book: "Woe betide to anyone who went against Aunt Suzy." In history class what you learn about colonial women is centered around the Salem witch trials and then Abigail Adams reminding her husband to "remember the ladies." You typically don't learn about Suzy Wright which is unfortunate because what a person. She was a poet, a scientist, a woman of law, a pacifist and a friend to many. A regular Renaissance woman. A book that tries and succeeds in putting together the [...]

    10. WOW! Yes, She sure was very Extraordinary Gal!I found this to be a very interesting and profound story of her life and the treat impact that she evidently had even over important men. So for this reason and for all the photos too I feel this needs to be a five star rated children's book. I received this ebook for free and recommend it for kids especially ages 8-12 and anyone else who maybe a history buff of say women like Suzy Wright and. in return here is my honest review. Thanks Teri and super [...]

    11. While I appreciated the information provided within this book, I felt that the organization of this book was lacking. Certain pages were easy to read and follow the information, however, other pages made the eye jump all over the page, not knowing where to begin. Also, I did not understand the need for the majority of quotations throughout the book to be a large font and colored red. I found this to be confusing and distracting, especially with the background provided throughout. A good book for [...]

    12. A fairly good account is made in this book about Suzy Wright, a colonial, quaker woman, who accomplished much during her life time! As a Children's biography I would say it is for older children, even teens. The research that Teri Kanefield did lends itself to a well established portrayal of this woman, who purposely didn't get married so that she could retain her rights to own land, and do as she willed. She was skilled in law, language, science and ethics. I wish I had known her. I would have [...]

    13. Interesting read on a woman who helped settle the Pennsylvania frontier. A good book to help children needing a report on women in history. Susanna Wright may be an inspiration to young girls. It also includes Quaker beliefs since Susanna was a Quaker and was politically active. She was involved in many aspects of colonial life. Very interesting read for those who like history or women who made a difference.

    14. Few people have heard of Suzy Wright, one of the earliest female political activists on the early colonial frontier. She was well respected by her contemporaries, Ben Franklin, James Logan, Dr. Bejamin Rush and other political leaders. Suzy was truly a "scholar" in many fields, land management, science and poetry. This book is a "must have " in every elementary and middle school library especially PA

    15. I read this immediately upon getting it in the mail from Teri. The book is so beautiful; the pictures and the pages are so well done. I loved the concept of the book and enjoyed learning about Suzy. I think this book could be a great addition to any library for young readers interested in our country's history.

    16. Content-wise this book was wonderful. It's short enough in length to not be overwhelming, and overall is totally accessible to is audience. However, I did find the layout of the book confusing. Quotes are in a big bold red font throughout the book. While the intention seems to be to highlight primary source material for students, I instead found this distracting.

    17. A great book about a colonial Quaker frontierswoman and the choices she made to stay true to her beliefs. I wish that we had access to more of her letters and poetry. We need to know more about Ms. Wright, her life and her influences.

    18. Great look at a little-known but highly accomplished Colonial American woman, and a good bit of insight into the influence of Quakers on American history.

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