A Manifesto for Theological Interpretation

A Manifesto for Theological Interpretation Recent decades have witnessed a renaissance of theological interpretation Craig Bartholomew coauthor of the bestselling The Drama of Scripture and Heath Thomas bring together a team of specialists t

  • Title: A Manifesto for Theological Interpretation
  • Author: Craig G. Bartholomew Heath A Thomas
  • ISBN: 9780801030871
  • Page: 471
  • Format: Paperback
  • Recent decades have witnessed a renaissance of theological interpretation Craig Bartholomew, coauthor of the bestselling The Drama of Scripture, and Heath Thomas bring together a team of specialists to articulate a multifaceted vision for returning rigorous biblical interpretation to the context of the church Developed by the internationally recognized Scripture and HermRecent decades have witnessed a renaissance of theological interpretation Craig Bartholomew, coauthor of the bestselling The Drama of Scripture, and Heath Thomas bring together a team of specialists to articulate a multifaceted vision for returning rigorous biblical interpretation to the context of the church Developed by the internationally recognized Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar, this book is designed to bring clarity and unity to the enterprise of theological interpretation It positively integrates multiple approaches to interpreting the Bible, combining academic rigor with pastoral sensitivity for professors, students, and church leaders.

    One thought on “A Manifesto for Theological Interpretation”

    1. This is certainly the most "user-friendly" monograph on TIS. It is an edited volume so it is uneven in quality and clarity. Many articles are helpful; others, not so much. The different commitments of the Manifesto itself, spelled out at the beginning, is probably the most clear of the chapters. The remaining chapters serve to explain and expand the different commitments.

    2. Many helpful insights brought to light here. The biggest critique can be summed up simply: it's far too ecumenical. When you try to include everyone in a hermeneutic, you end up including no one. Nearly all of the principles advocated for in this volume can be identical in form (i.e the language used to describe the principles) but must necessarily differ in actual meaning depending on where one comes from. Terms like "gospel," "canon," and "revelation" must carry different meanings for the diff [...]

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