Eleven

Eleven Told entirely in e mails sent and received by Martin Davies would be author and frustrated corporate accountant this debut novel is set on September in Cardiff Wales In denial about his b

  • Title: Eleven
  • Author: David Llewellyn
  • ISBN: 9781854114150
  • Page: 388
  • Format: Paperback
  • Told entirely in e mails sent and received by Martin Davies, would be author and frustrated corporate accountant, this debut novel is set on September 11, 2001, in Cardiff, Wales In denial about his breakup with his girlfriend and baffled by the triviality of his life, Martin gossips online at his desk and makes plans for the weekend until just after his crowd of young prTold entirely in e mails sent and received by Martin Davies, would be author and frustrated corporate accountant, this debut novel is set on September 11, 2001, in Cardiff, Wales In denial about his breakup with his girlfriend and baffled by the triviality of his life, Martin gossips online at his desk and makes plans for the weekend until just after his crowd of young professionals returns from lunch people start flying airliners into office buildings in New York City Very funny and then brutally sad, Martin s messages by the time the day is over have run the gamut from nonsense straight out of The Office to something closer to a play by Samuel Beckett.

    One thought on “Eleven”

    1. If you couldn't guess by the cover and the title, Eleven is a story set on 9/11, and is compiled as a series of e-mails throughout the day. Our protagonist is Martin Davies, a guy who is desperately stuck in a rut in his boring, pointless, corporate job, and who longs to be an author in control of his own life but doesn't know how to make it happen. Like anyone who has ever been trapped in the mundane hell of an office job that they don't like, Martin takes out his frustrations and boredom in a [...]

    2. Is the following a compliment? I started this book at 1am last night, after coming home from a night out, quite drunk, and waiting for a scouse interloped to go to sleep on the couch. I finished it when I woke up at ten o’clock this morning, hungover, and finished it. So the book is both a) short and b) quite suited to a strange world-lag of drunkenness and hangover.Eleven is set in a Cardiff financial office, told in a series of emails between Martin Davies and various others, including a col [...]

    3. Readability: Pretty much the most readable thing ever - it's not a big book anyway, and it's made up entirely of e-mails which breaks it up into tiny little sections of text, so it's literally the easiest thing to read ever. I read it in one day - I started it on the short train ride to work, read for about half an hour on my lunch break, and was finished before I was even halfway into the train journey home. I think it's also incredibly readable if you have ever worked in an office, specificall [...]

    4. This felt incredibly thin, as if I was supposed to be impressed by the giddy creativity of combining emails and 9/11. NOT emails from the Twin Towers on or before 9/11, mind you: just random, silly emails, of the kind we've all sent or received, between co-workers in an unidentified office in the UK -- grumbling about annoying co-workers, moaning about hangovers, plotting escape to other, better jobs. I believe the author thinks this most ephemeral of ephemera achieves a Deep Poignancy when, one [...]

    5. From the Guardian:A compulsive read, written entirely in the form of emails sent by the characters over the course of one day. Martin and his friends work in the offices and call centres of Cardiff; and in its hilarious depiction of the grim hypocrisy of modern working life, Eleven is on a par with The Office. But Martin also writes a series of soul-searching emails to himself, which he then saves in Drafts, which form a moving contrast to the razor sharp comedy. Though it takes place on 9/11, m [...]

    6. Although it has excellent reviews (and is probably written before them), I can't help but compare the novel to Matt Beaumont's 'E' and, to a lesser extent, Joshua Ferris' 'Then We Came to the End', as they all have some or all of the novel written via e-mail. If I'd read this first, I probably would've given it 3 stars, but the others are better (especially Ferris' novel.)

    7. Breve romanzo interamente composto da messaggi e-mail.11 settembre 2001: una giornata come tante in un ufficio come tanti. Tra amicizie, gelosie e resoconti delle avventure della sera prima, l'angoscia esistenziale del protagonista si riversa in una serie di e-mail mai inviate, mentre sullo sfondo si dipanano avvenimenti epocali ancora troppo sconcertanti per sembrare reali.

    8. This is a great modern take on the epistolary novel, composed entirely of email messages. It uses the backdrop of 9/11 to show a day in the life of Martin. It condemns modern society as it draws in the modern reader and makes you think.

    9. There's a whole genre of 9/11 fiction nowis one is pretty good. Still, nothing really compares to the book 102 Minutes, which is a nonfiction account of that morning. This book gives a view from "across the pond," showing how the events that day affected other people in other countries.

    10. An account of a man frustrated by his situation losing himself as the events of September 11th 2001 unfold but told via emails between him and colleagues in his dead end job. Really interesting way to tell a story and a very strong debut novel.

    11. While it's a weird, funny and most of all disturbing story showing how and about what people communicate in our time of insteant e-mailing, I found that it is a bit overrated. Also, 9/11 doesn't really play a major role in it.I quite liked the e-mails that were not sent, though.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *