Time and Place Are Nonsense: The Films of Seijun Suzuki

Time and Place Are Nonsense The Films of Seijun Suzuki Japanese film director Seijun Suzuki began his career making increasingly outrageous B movies for Nikkatsu Studios in the s and s he was eventually fired for his stylistic excesses More than t

  • Title: Time and Place Are Nonsense: The Films of Seijun Suzuki
  • Author: Tom Vick
  • ISBN: 9780934686334
  • Page: 257
  • Format: Paperback
  • Japanese film director Seijun Suzuki began his career making increasingly outrageous B movies for Nikkatsu Studios in the 1950s and 1960s he was eventually fired for his stylistic excesses More than ten years later, he reinvented himself as an independent filmmaker with a uniquely eccentric vision He remains a cult figure outside of Japan and his influence can be seenJapanese film director Seijun Suzuki began his career making increasingly outrageous B movies for Nikkatsu Studios in the 1950s and 1960s he was eventually fired for his stylistic excesses More than ten years later, he reinvented himself as an independent filmmaker with a uniquely eccentric vision He remains a cult figure outside of Japan and his influence can be seen in the work of directors as diverse as Jim Jarmusch, Baz Luhrmann, and Quentin Tarantino Time and Place Are Nonsense, the first book length study of his work in English, aims to enhance the appreciation of his films by analyzing them in light of the cultural and political turmoil of post World War II Japan and the aesthetic traditions that inform them.

    One thought on “Time and Place Are Nonsense: The Films of Seijun Suzuki”

    1. This book, written in a style similar to a catalog for an art exhibition, provides an excellent and readable overview of Suzuki's professional life. It's full of illustrative stills and clearly stated analyses of the most identifiable trademarks of Suzuki's style. While it doesn't attempt to make a definitive interpretation, it takes time to consider each film, and does an admirable job of placing them in context, both at the time they were created and in the contemporary canon. Recommended in p [...]

    2. I've been preparing to read Tom Vick's book Time And Place Are Nonsense: The Films Of Seijun Suzuki (2015) by watching some of the films from his oeuvre that I missed (Underworld Beauty, Tattooed Life, and Kanto Wanderer). I'm glad that I did since those films were discussed along with his more well known titles such as Branded To Kill and Tokyo Drifter. Vick does a good job of covering several different aspects of Suzuki and his films in the following chapters: 1. Branded to Kill and the "Suzuk [...]

    3. Picked this one up following a lecture by the author as part of a Suzuki retrospective being held this Fall in D.C. Suzuki has always been one of my favorite directors, and Vick's book offers a great analysis of his work. Certainly written for a niche audience, but I would recommend this to anybody who has an interest in film.

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