Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court

Culture of Encounters Sanskrit at the Mughal Court Culture of Encounters documents the fascinating exchange between the Persian speaking Islamic elite of the Mughal Empire and traditional Sanskrit scholars which engendered a dynamic idea of Mughal ru

  • Title: Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court
  • Author: Audrey Truschke
  • ISBN: 9780231173629
  • Page: 264
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Culture of Encounters documents the fascinating exchange between the Persian speaking Islamic elite of the Mughal Empire and traditional Sanskrit scholars, which engendered a dynamic idea of Mughal rule essential to the empire s survival This history begins with the invitation of Brahman and Jain intellectuals to King Akbar s court in the 1560s, then details the numerousCulture of Encounters documents the fascinating exchange between the Persian speaking Islamic elite of the Mughal Empire and traditional Sanskrit scholars, which engendered a dynamic idea of Mughal rule essential to the empire s survival This history begins with the invitation of Brahman and Jain intellectuals to King Akbar s court in the 1560s, then details the numerous Mughal backed texts they and their Mughal interlocutors produced under emperors Akbar, Jahangir 1605 1627 , and Shah Jahan 1628 1658 Many works, including Sanskrit epics and historical texts, were translated into Persian, elevating the political position of Brahmans and Jains and cultivating a voracious appetite for Indian writings throughout the Mughal world.The first book to read these Sanskrit and Persian works in tandem, Culture of Encounters recasts the Mughal Empire as a polyglot polity that collaborated with its Indian subjects to envision its sovereignty The work also reframes the development of Brahman and Jain communities under Mughal rule, which coalesced around carefully selected, politically salient memories of imperial interaction Along with its groundbreaking findings, Culture of Encounters certifies the critical role of the sociology of empire in building the Mughal polity, which came to irrevocably shape the literary and ruling cultures of early modern India.

    One thought on “Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court”

    1. A few major mistakes in the book though, the author has stated that Dara Shikoh was Aurangzeb's younger brother on various occasions. It is a known fact that Dara was Shahjahan's eldest son and first in line to the throne. Apart from that a very descriptive coverage of the topic. A little repetitive at times but contains many peculiar details about the Mughal court and the political and religious environment of that era.

    2. A very interesting examination of little-known (to me) interactions between Mongol rulers in India and the Indians over whom they ruled. Although this is a scholarly work likely to have very limited appeal, but the history described by Truscke has broad relevance (which she makes clear enough).

    3. The book delves deep into The Socio-Cultural realm of the Mughal Court during Akbar, Jahangir, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb’s time, giving us a surprise every few pages that causes us to recalibrate our thoughts and our knowledge. The book contains proof and evidence which you can check for yourself; more of this in the bibliography. The book is a unique and fresh look at a period of history that we clearly do not understand fully, one that needs scholarly examination. The one regret that I have i [...]

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