Atul Gawande's Being Mortal:

Atul Gawande s Being Mortal Being Mortal by writer Atul Gawande focuses on several critical issues that include death aging mortality and critical and terminal illness This is a summary and review of the original book Availab

  • Title: Atul Gawande's Being Mortal:
  • Author: Ant Hive Media
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 486
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Being Mortal, by writer Atul Gawande focuses on several critical issues that include death, aging, mortality and critical and terminal illness This is a summary and review of the original book Available in a variety of formats, this summary offers you as a reader the opportunity to enjoy great writings.when you might not have the time to read the original book Being MortBeing Mortal, by writer Atul Gawande focuses on several critical issues that include death, aging, mortality and critical and terminal illness This is a summary and review of the original book Available in a variety of formats, this summary offers you as a reader the opportunity to enjoy great writings.when you might not have the time to read the original book Being Mortal, by writer Atul Gawande focuses on several critical issues that include death, aging, mortality and critical and terminal illness The writer has included vast research and has chronicled stories and experiences of his own patients, patients of other doctors and stories of his members of the family The story based on these experiences provides information to readers regarding various circumstances, life situations and scenarios, which can facilitate people to find an optimum journey through the final days of their own lives or the lives of their family members Key Takeaways 1 Nursing homes neither have been created for assisting elderly persons to reduce their level of dependency on another person nor to provide better options than the poorhouses The purpose for creating nursing homes is clearing hospital beds 2 Assisted living therefore has risen from the requirement to provide alternative solution to nursing homes, which can make patients independent and have a better grip over their own lives 3 Most people, in the later years of their own lives want something than survival and that is where nursing homes, medical institutions and assisted living fail 4 People must question what makes life worth living at the time when they get old, are frail, ill and have to depend on another person for their daily care.

    One thought on “Atul Gawande's Being Mortal:”

    1. This is a really good book written in a personal and conversational style, yet with a touch of professionalism. It is very informative touching upon various aspects of health care for the aged and terminally ill: assisted living, nursing homes, hospice care and hospitals. Gawande does not shy away from the difficult topics of facing deaths, failure, difficult conversations etc. Between the chapters, he intertwines the story of his struggles, and the choices he made when faced with the same dilem [...]

    2. I read this for bookclub - and I really enjoyed it. All of us are going to die sometime, and this is an excellent look at the end of life decisions that we will all have to make sometime - written by a Surgeon who has participated patients facing the issue. It's really a must read for all of us. If it weren't for my bookclub, I probably would never have read this - I'm so glad that I did. I see that the image of the book is of the "Summary" - I read the book not the summary, but I don't know how [...]

    3. Learned a lot from this book and I would recommend reading it. A surgeon learns that medicine is greater than fixing the person and options are broader than treatment A and B and C, esoecially when pain or the end of life is near. The challenge is knowing if the end is near, but the answer lies in discussing choices in broader manners. Skirting fears could lead to poor decisions and regrets. I love this question the author's dying father asks, "What is the shortest time you've seen and the longe [...]

    4. This is an important book about an important issue - preparing for end of life. Gawande using anecdotes and a conversational tone which makes entering into the discussion come easily. A doctor by profession, he is not technical, and he uses stories from his own and his family's experience to illustrate his points. Too often families confront a life threatening situation without having discussed the desires or expectations of the loved one. Although Gawande's approach may not work for everyone ( [...]

    5. this is a book that challenges your thoughts about mortality. I found it thoughtful and provoking - and reflect that I need to manage my own health as long as possible but make decisions as to my ending well before I get to a stage where I am incapable of deciding. It reaffirmed a lot of my thoughts about growing older and how to stay as active as possible relative to the state of your health too. I liked the life stories that Atul Gawande used throughout the book which gave you further insight [...]

    6. I picked up this book as part of a group readingis is definitely not my kind of book was a very different bookn for the first time I cant decide whether I liked it or didnt.while reading the book, it got me so close to the experience of how it feels to be in a position when your loved one is dyingI hated it.but at the same time, this book highlights the limitations of medical science n how a patient should be treated for terminal illnessis is a must read book for mid to old age groups so that th [...]

    7. A great book written by a Dr. of medicine, Atul Gawande. People's life stories are used to give insight to the current medical world and medical profession's way of thinking and responding to our health care. Repairing our health no matter the cost and ignoring our soul. Doctors should use medicine to improve life but also death. The quality of life versus the quantity of life. Do not confine people's choices in the name of safety but to expand them in the name of living a worthwhile life. I wan [...]

    8. This is a must read. Although we don't like to think about the subjects in this book, they are unavoidable. As we face end of life, we should all think about the questions he raises. How do we want to live at the end? What do we hope for and what do we fear? What do we need from our doctors when faced with impossible decisions.Gawande tells of innovation in nursing homes, assisted living centers, and hospice that can bring us out of the 'asylum' type warehouses many of our nursing homes have bec [...]

    9. With the baby boom generation(my generation) having to face the illnesses of their parents, and health concerns of our own I found this book to really hit home. I wish it had been written, and I could have read it about 5-7 years ago when my dad started to have declining health. I think the things that were written about in this book would have given me a better perspective as my dad faced his health concerns and his mortality. Gawande wrote a readable and thought provoking book. I am glad I rea [...]

    10. The book started speaking to me by chapter 5. A Better Life. Until that point it was information I had learned while finding my parents care and services. Dr. Gawande took several people's stories to explain how our system does and doesn't work in assisting with end of life care and concerns. It wasn't at all settling news. He provides an opening for important conversations with our beloveds. Four questions, when answered, may help people make decisions and efforts towards living whole for as lo [...]

    11. After watching my dad die and not being able to fulfill his wishes, I had some instincts on death and dying and wanted to see if my instincts were off the wall crazy. I learned that treatment and dying should be the dying person's wishes not the family choices. I learned that often family and doctors try to keep the patient alive, no matter what. This might include unnecessary surgeries and excessive treatments and medicines. This book was filled with information to ponder and understand the mea [...]

    12. Compassion for the elderly and the dying. Recognizing the need for people to be in control of the death, that medicine's attitude of keeping people alive at all costs, economically, spiritually, emotionally, and physically might have some better alternatives when people are give choices and the opportunity to voice their wishes. Supportive of assisted living, hospice, home health care. Good ideas! Especially helpful for those dealing with these decisions to be make with their loved ones.

    13. Eye-opening. In many ways, this book changed how I perceive aging. There's no doubt we lack decent options for our elderly. What we may not realize now, but will very soon, is that our society and medical community are not prepared for the millions of baby boomers who will need care in the next 20-30 years.

    14. This is an important book for older people, and the younger people who care about them. It inspires older folks to take control of how they want to live the ending years of their lives. It inspires younger people to give the older people they love to allow it.The writing isn't up to what could have been, but the material forgives that.

    15. This is an interesting book about mortality. I felt an important aspect of the book was dealing with the dignity and respect that everyone deserves at the end of their life and honoring their wishes.

    16. I read the book, not the summary. It was excellent. A must read for us older folks and I would recommend it highly for those with older friends, relatives, etc. I'm going to designate someone to ask me the questions the author poses if I become terminal.

    17. Do to the subject matter,examples of difficult situations in regard to aging the successessful resolutions of examples over and and over again. Having a 92 year old father 3000 miles a way and getting older myself I found it more difficult to read than helpful.

    18. Very thought provoking. " Riveting, honest and humane. Being Mortal shows how ultimate goal not good death but a god life, all the way to the very end."

    19. This is an excellent book. Thought provoking and extremely valuable as i think about wills and medical directivesAllowed me focus in a twisty turny time

    20. Such a great book with a lot of information you will need. There are also suggestions of how to start conversations that may need to happen. It's a quick read but so worth the time!

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