Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti

Deadly River Cholera and Cover Up in Post Earthquake Haiti In October nine months after the massive earthquake that devastated Haiti a second disaster began to unfold soon to become the world s largest cholera epidemic in modern times In a country that

  • Title: Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti
  • Author: Ralph R. Frerichs
  • ISBN: 9781501702303
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In October 2010, nine months after the massive earthquake that devastated Haiti, a second disaster began to unfold soon to become the world s largest cholera epidemic in modern times In a country that had never before reported cholera, the epidemic mysteriously and simultaneously appeared in river communities of central Haiti, eventually triggering nearly 800,000 cases anIn October 2010, nine months after the massive earthquake that devastated Haiti, a second disaster began to unfold soon to become the world s largest cholera epidemic in modern times In a country that had never before reported cholera, the epidemic mysteriously and simultaneously appeared in river communities of central Haiti, eventually triggering nearly 800,000 cases and 9,000 deaths What had caused the first cases of cholera in Haiti in recorded history Who or what was the deadly agent of origin Why did it explode in the agricultural rich delta of the Artibonite River When answers were few, rumors spread, causing social and political consequences of their own Wanting insight, the Haitian government and French embassy requested epidemiological assistance from France A few weeks into the epidemic, physician and infectious disease specialist Renaud Piarroux arrived in Haiti.In Deadly River, Ralph R Frerichs tells the story of the epidemic of a French disease detective determined to trace its origins so that he could help contain the spread and possibly eliminate the disease and the political intrigue that has made that effort so difficult The story involves political maneuvering by powerful organizations such as the United Nations and its peacekeeping troops in Haiti, as well as by the World Health Organization and the U.S Centers for Disease Control Frerichs explores a quest for scientific truth and dissects a scientific disagreement involving world renowned cholera experts who find themselves embroiled in intellectual and political turmoil in a poverty stricken country.Frerichs s narrative highlights how the world s wealthy nations, nongovernmental agencies, and international institutions respond when their interests clash with the needs of the world s most vulnerable people The story poses big social questions and offers insights not only on how to eliminate cholera in Haiti but also how nations, NGOs, and international organizations such as the UN and CDC deal with catastrophic infectious disease epidemics.

    One thought on “Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti”

    1. Nine months after the catastrophic January 2010 earthquake that took over 220,000 lives, UN 'peacekeeping' troops from Nepal brought cholera to Haiti and unleashed an epidemic that continues to this day. It is estimated that 7% of Haitians now carry the bacteria; over 8000 have died. Yet, the UN denies culpability (although Ban Ki Moon has indicated that he understands the origin of the disease) and continues to fight "the most organized challenge to UN immunity yet" (New York Times).Deadly Rive [...]

    2. I had been hoping to go to Haiti as an aid volunteer in the wake of the 7.0 earthquake in January 2010. An outbreak of cholera stopped aid workers from travelling. Consequently I was interested in this account of how the cholera reached an island which had never had a single reported case and the tragedy that unfolded. Renaud Piarroux had studied diseases and worked in many countries. The Haitian government asked him to provide expertise as he had actually managed to eliminate cholera from an Af [...]

    3. An eye-opening look at the lengths nationally recognized organizations will go to to prevent the public from discovering the source of a cholera outbreak in order to keep political ties between Haiti's government and the UN. Not so easy to keep said tie when the UN's MINUSTAH workers were the ones who brought cholera to Haiti years of misdirection of aid efforts kept the epidemic in Haiti (it's still there). A cautionary tale in what happens when the search for the source of an outbreak is ignor [...]

    4. Very informative without going over the average reader's head. The author and subject's compassion for the local people, and passion for science really shown through. The only real negative was that it seemed a bit repetitive at times. I received a copy of Deadly River from the publisher and netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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