The Trouble with Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis

The Trouble with Pleasure Deleuze and Psychoanalysis Is pleasure a rotten idea mired in negativity and lack which should be abandoned in favor of a new concept of desire Or is desire itself fundamentally a matter of lack absence and loss This is one

  • Title: The Trouble with Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis
  • Author: Aaron Schuster
  • ISBN: 9780262528597
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Paperback
  • Is pleasure a rotten idea, mired in negativity and lack, which should be abandoned in favor of a new concept of desire Or is desire itself fundamentally a matter of lack, absence, and loss This is one of the crucial issues dividing the work of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Lacan, two of the most formidable figures of postwar French thought Though the encounter with psychoaIs pleasure a rotten idea, mired in negativity and lack, which should be abandoned in favor of a new concept of desire Or is desire itself fundamentally a matter of lack, absence, and loss This is one of the crucial issues dividing the work of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Lacan, two of the most formidable figures of postwar French thought Though the encounter with psychoanalysis deeply marked Deleuze s work, we are yet to have a critical account of the very different postures he adopted toward psychoanalysis, and especially Lacanian theory, throughout his career In The Trouble with Pleasure, Aaron Schuster tackles this tangled relationship head on The result is neither a Lacanian reading of Deleuze nor a Deleuzian reading of Lacan but rather a systematic and comparative analysis that identifies concerns common to both thinkers and their ultimately incompatible ways of addressing them Schuster focuses on drive and desire the strange, convoluted relationship of human beings to the forces that move them from within the trouble with pleasure Along the way, Schuster offers his own engaging and surprising conceptual analyses and inventive examples In the Critique of Pure Complaint he provides a philosophy of complaining, ranging from Freud s theory of neurosis to Spinoza s intellectual complaint of God and the Deleuzian great complaint Schuster goes on to elaborate, among other things, a theory of love as mutually compatible symptoms an original philosophical history of pleasure, including a hypothetical Heideggerian treatise and a Platonic theory of true pleasure and an exploration of the 1920s literature of the death drive, including Thomas Mann, Italo Svevo, and Blaise Cendrars.

    One thought on “The Trouble with Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis”

    1. Schuster makes the attempt to bring Deleuze into discussion with psychoanalysis without resorting to oversimplifications and vulgar reductions. While the book ultimately offers no grand conclusion or resolution, Schuster makes a lot of high theory accessible. The problem is that the book becomes absorbed into summaries and takes no definitive stand. There's also a lot of stylistic imitation of Zizek, but nothing that encroaches on Schuster's own material. Schuster spends a lot of time developing [...]

    2. I picked this book up after listening to a Podcast by Schuster (I actually mistook him for Zizek). I came to Lacan by way of Deleuze, and have been doing my best to give him a charitable reading (Bruce Fink was quite helpful in this regard). I will say that, for a Lacanian who is writing in a series presided by Zizek, this book is awfully gracious towards Deleuze. I appreciate the bend towards psychoanalysis, as well as Schuster's attempt to resist the cliche reading of Deleuze as simply a philo [...]

    3. Well worth the readSuccinctly summarizes and compares Lacan and Deluez. An excellent starting point for further understanding these complex works. Three more words, required.

    4. This is a very readable book which brings out the connections and disconnections between Deleuzean and Lacanian thought in a clear and accessible way, although I imagine the level of clarity is probably somewhat dependent on the reader's background and prior reading. There is an obvious Lacanian direction to the book and Schuster appears to feel considerably more comfortable and confident when discussing Lacan. He does, however, for someone with a background in Lacan, at least, render aspects of [...]

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