David Copperfield

David Copperfield One of Dickens s best loved and most personal novels David Copperfield is the embodiment of Dickens s own boyhood experience recalling his employment as a child in a London warehouse This edition wh

  • Title: David Copperfield
  • Author: Charles Dickens
  • ISBN: 9780199536290
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Paperback
  • One of Dickens s best loved and most personal novels, David Copperfield is the embodiment of Dickens s own boyhood experience recalling his employment as a child in a London warehouse This edition, which has the accurate Clarendon text, includes Dickens s trial titles and working notes, and eight original illustrations by Phiz About the Series For over 100 years OxforOne of Dickens s best loved and most personal novels, David Copperfield is the embodiment of Dickens s own boyhood experience recalling his employment as a child in a London warehouse This edition, which has the accurate Clarendon text, includes Dickens s trial titles and working notes, and eight original illustrations by Phiz About the Series For over 100 years Oxford World s Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe Each affordable volume reflects Oxford s commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up to date bibliographies for further study, and much .

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    1. DAVID COPPERFIELD: MASTER VILLAINoh you architect of doom!your devious passivity and willful naivete know no boundaries!your crimes are many!your poor doting mother - hustled off to an early grave, and you do nothing!you repay the Murdstones' attempts at improvement with intransigence and a savage bite!you return Mr. Creakle's guiding hand with laziness and scorn!you do nothing as your idol Steerforth humiliates Mr. Mell!you run from honest work in a factory! you must be too good for that!you im [...]

    2. Read as part of The Infinite Variety Reading Challenge, based on the BBC's Big Read Poll of 2003.Charles Dickens can do no wrong, except perhaps keep around 100 pages of rather irrelevant tangents in this book.It was such a powerhouse of characterisation and world-building that I barely know where to begin. All of the characters were utterly divine, even the detestable Uriah Heep and the unbelievably pathetic Dora, and most especially the wonderful early Feminist icon that is Betsy Trotwood. I o [...]

    3. “This narrative is my written memory”, declares David Copperfield in the last section of this elephantine novel, a sentence that strongly implies an autobiographical imprint of the author in the making of his famous middle-class hero. But is that aspect what I most value of this work? Far from it.This thick volume is quite an ambitious journey: partly a comic story, which often verges on a tale for children, and partly a picaresque book tinged with distinctive dramatic intention that fluctua [...]

    4. Call it an act of heresy but I’m abandoning this. I’ve got to page 600 which means I’ve only another 150 pages to go but I’ve completely lost interest. The characters are too one dimensional and you can see the plot coming as if it’s daubed in road marking paint. I’ve read all of Dickens’ novels except the early ones and mostly loved them except for Tale of two Cities and the reason I’d never read this was I believed, mistakenly, it was another early one. However it reads like an [...]

    5. Status Report: Chapters 1 - 8i had forgotten how much i love Dickens. the man is a master at the immersive experience. it is really easy for me to get sucked into the world he is so carefully constructing, to revel in all the extensive details, the lavish description, the almost overripe imagination at work. his strength at creating a wide range of entirely lived-in settings (both brief snapshots of places in passing and crucial places like David's home and school) is equalled by his even more f [...]

    6. "I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is DAVID COPPERFIELD"I have also a favorite author and his name is Charles Dickens. This novel is poetry. To truly appreciate the beauty of the English language, one must read David Copperfield. This book cannot be classified. It is a love story, a drama, and a comedy. It has elements of horror and suspense. I laughed hysterically, sobbed uncontrollably, and threw it to a wall in a fit of anger. It annoyed, bored, and entrapped me. Th [...]

    7. Bravo, Dickens! I have to say that, copying Thackaray for the millionth time, probably. What a difference to read the original, compared to the watered-down versions I was familiar with from my childhood. It took me quite a lot of time to get into the rich flow of words, the beautiful allusions, and the dry humour, but then I was hooked. My family will always remember the Christmas vacation when I was in a rage against Uriah Heep, not able to contain my anger, sharing my frustration loudly! But [...]

    8. My first Dickens, this book came highly recommended to me and after jumping around this for almost three years I finally managed to read it this time. This book was also a big achievement for me in terms of classics last year. I started three classics, putting them on halt for other books at different times. This is the only tome (classic) that I finished. So yeah, it was a huge achievement for me, especially because I loved it.So am not going to write here what this book is about as almost ever [...]

    9. 898. David Copperfield, Charles Dickens David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens. The novel's full title is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account). It was first published as a serial in 1849–50, and as a book in 1850. Many elements of the novel follow events in Dickens's own life, and it is often considered as his veiled autobiography. It was Dickens' [...]

    10. David Copperfield is an early queer novel by Charles Dickens. It follows David Copperfield, a gay man in early 19th century England, as he tries to seduce and betroth another gay man, James Steerforth. Copperfield first sets his eyes on Steerforth at Salem House where they both must subdue their love for each other, giving their age difference and the society of the time. However, as the novel progresses, Copperfield and Steerforth live openly as a homosexual couple. Their relationship comes int [...]

    11. As always after reading such a density, it is a bit of a friend left on the road. Dickens himself will admit to having had difficulty in quitting David Copperfield after such a long intimacy!This novel is, he says in the preface, his favorite, and when he has to read an extract in front of an audience, a few years later, the choice of this extract is anguishing because this novel is a whole, a set of entangled narratives one in the other that can not be separated without breaking the fabric of t [...]

    12. Read the majority of this over the course of 4 days snowed in under 2 or so feet of blizzard and its dimming snowlight day's circular repetition, in a new house, often in near silence only punctuated by winter robins chirping outside, in between making pots of coffee and organizing my books and music and furniture. I can think of few more delightful states in which to absorb this classic Bildungsroman, which appears to be one of that genre of book called Perfect Novel. Shall I read more Dickens? [...]

    13. I picked up this book in a bookstore (if you can believe it), not really thinking I'd buy such a big pile of pages in classical English, figuring it would bore the hell out of me. I read the first page.I then proceeded to the counter, and bought it.This is the beginning of my love story with "David Copperfield", an absolute favorite. It takes a particular mindset to read it I think, so it took me a while to finish it, matching my reading moments with that mindset as much as possible. You need a [...]

    14. "I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child, and his name is David Copperfield" - Charles Dickens.As a HUGE fan of Sir Charles Dickens, I can't say this is a normal book. This is his most personal one, according to himself.Why 4 out of 5 stars? Because it was kind of difficult to digest it a bit, I had to go through some pages more than once and try to get the origin of some characters, but most of them are in my head now. Easy to fall in love with them, and the story itself is kind of unfor [...]

    15. Finished. Having a hard time spinning superlatives for this review. It is more or less established I strongly like, or passionately love, every Dickens novel I read so why not slap a five-star badge on this masterpiece and hop down to Bev’s café for a veggie burger, free sexual innuendo with every purchase, a fly in every milkshake, and a 50p discount on all half-cooked omelettes? Fine. Some highlights. Improvements in characterisation. Notably, the villains. David’s friendship with Steerfo [...]

    16. I found this book in a junk pile in a nearby neighborhood shop. I've been burnt by Dickens before (Tale of two Cities). I swore up and down I would never suffer through a another Dickens book ever again. When I spotted this beautiful mint condition vintage copy of David Copperfield, I just couldn't resist. It was free and it seemed like such a shame to just leave it there. It was snowy and damp and I knew if someone didn't rescue it it would become sinfully ruined. I knew if I took it home I was [...]

    17. I finished reading David Copperfield on the Kindle a few days ago.I’m not an English major, and so I’m not going to pretend to be one. I’m not going to discuss what themes the book touches on, what category it fits in, or generally dissect it to the point where it’s more monotonous than fun.I read the book because I wanted to, not because I had to write a paper about it.I must say, first of all, that this has got to be one of the best books I’ve ever read. The vivid descriptions of the [...]

    18. David Copperfield is one of my favourite Dickens' books, and I tend to enjoy Dickens quite a lot. It's not a perfect book by any means, and on this read, I noticed that it lagged in the middle. (I suddenly found it much harder to pick up and was more easily distracted by the graphic novels that are my husband's bathroom reading materials.) But it picked up again by the end.Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in policy and enforcement. You can read why I ca [...]

    19. ادبیات فقط کلاسیکدیوید کاپرفیلد: هرچند از خواندن این کتاب 8 تا 10 سال می گذره ولی همچنان تحت تاثیر داستان سرشار از زندگی اونم، این کتاب مثل یک داروی انرژی زا یا کتابی برای موفقیت هست، چنان شما رو از اعماق تنهایی و ناامیدی به قله شور و هیجان و امیدواری میرسونه که کاری جز تلاش و مو [...]

    20. “It was as true,” said Mr. Barkis, “as turnips is. It was as true,” Mr. Barkis said, nodding his nightcap, which was his only means of emphasis, “as taxes is. And nothing’s truer than them.”I enjoyed the hell out of this book. From the first page to the last, I was having a damned good time. I even made quite a bother of myself several times among friends and family, imitating my favorite characters, only to get blank stares and polite smiles, as I realized that not one among them [...]

    21. So, Dickens, the most beloved English author since Shakespeare. How good is he? Is he as good as Tolstoy? No, he's not as good as Tolstoy. As good as Dumas? No. Hugo? Let's call it a tie. What about other Brits? Well, he's not even close to George Eliot. He's about as good as Thomas Hardy.He has a better feel for what it's like to be poor than most of those authors, and that's a big plus for him; even if you don't like poor people, Dickens' willingness to dive into the alleys makes a nice change [...]

    22. Top Ten Tips to Young Ladies of Marriageable Age by Charles Dickens10. Giggle alot. Be innocent, stupid, and silly. Flirt with a rival and blush charmingly. 9. Have an annoying lap dog. 8. Have a best friend who will act as a go-between. Impecunious and overprotective fathers are to be avoided, but indulgent aunts should be welcomed. 7. Ensure that the man courting you has the ability to provide for you and your future family. If need be, move to Australia. 6. Stay away, especially, from fortune [...]

    23. Umble we are, umble we have been, umble we shall ever beMy Personal Favorite Story Ever“Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.” So opens the best story ever of a youngster's journey into adulthood and amour. Nearly 20 years after writing David Copperfield, Dickens said, "like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favorite child. And his name is David Copperfield."Dickens' most colorful a [...]

    24. I reread this so I could join a friend who was reading Dickens for the first time (she thinks).Page 424 in my copy is the perfect mixture of what Dickens achieves throughout the whole novel. I noted three instances of chuckle-out-loud humor on that one page alone — David's desire to pitch Uriah over the banister; the character he has dubbed Hamlet’s aunt as having “the family failing of indulging in soliloquy”; and the talk of Blood at a particular dinner table causing him to liken the s [...]

    25. I acquired this book from my father's bookshelf. It was bought by my father in 1964 (oh how I love old books!). This book by Charles Dickens is definitely a masterpiece! Although the author has died long ago, but I believe that his books and novels still live within us because of their marvelous concept and breathtaking events. And David Copperfield is certainly not an exception. It is said that this book is a reflection of the author’s life and that makes it more meaningful I feel. The story [...]

    26. A thoroughly charming and uplifting tale of an orphan who grew up through much hardship and travail in Victorian England. By pluck and good luck he finds the right people to support and inspire him, and to love and to protect in turn, and thereby approach his ambition to become “the hero of his own life.” It’s long, but it fulfills the quota for books you don’t mind lingering with, where each chapter in my Libravox audiobook version whetted my interest for the next. In the serialized ver [...]

    27. I read this at the same time I read Ready Player One and A Game of Thrones. Those are super exciting, grab your hair and run around, can't put the book down adventure stories. *whispers* This was better. It was a slow read for me. Nothing super exciting happens. There are no cliffhangers at the end of each chapter. But it was GOOD. Dickens outdid himself here. Probably my second favorite of his, behind Bleak House but ahead of Great Expectations. And the last one I still rated 5 stars.

    28. I felt it to be such a daunting task to read this book! I'm not one to give up on a book once I begin reading, but I certainly came close with this one. It was by no means a poorly written story; actually, it was some of the best writing I have read in quite a while. I was sad for David Copperfield as he experienced so much loss in his life. I enjoyed the ending, which seemed a happy one, comparatively speaking.

    29. D, is for Dickens.Truth be told this would be a 4 if I didn't know it was an abridgment of the original (mine is 204 pages long). the sheer egotism of hacking and splicing Dickens words galls me to no end!! Review Time:I have been putting off writing this review for what feels like ages, in actuality it’s only a little over a week, because I had to come to terms with my own failings and find a way to review this without all the tar and feathers I feel like ANY abridged Dickens deserves.It is m [...]

    30. What a wonderful story by the great Charles Dickens. A tale of escape and adventure. Mr Murdstone is a particularly nasty man and Uriah Heep a nefarious person indeed. Dickens was a master of describing the dour and squalid Victorian period. The draconian schools and work houses. Most all of Dickens work describes, through fantastic characterized personalities in his narrative, how the Victorian era was a terrible time to live if one was poor. The divide between the elite few and the impoverishe [...]

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