War Porn

War Porn War porn n Videos images and narratives featuring graphic violence often brought back from combat zones viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification Such media are often presented and ci

  • Title: War Porn
  • Author: Roy Scranton
  • ISBN: 9781616957155
  • Page: 180
  • Format: Hardcover
  • War porn, n Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes War porn is also, in Roy Scranton s searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of wa War porn, n Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes War porn is also, in Roy Scranton s searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of war in the age of the War on Terror, the fracturing and fragmentation of perspective, time, and self that afflicts soldiers and civilians alike, and the global networks and face to face moments that suture our fragmented lives together In War Porn three lives fit inside one another like nesting dolls a restless young woman at an end of summer barbecue in Utah an American soldier in occupied Baghdad and Qasim al Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor, who faces the US invasion of his country with fear, denial, and perseverance As War Porn cuts from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, we come to see America through the eyes of the occupied, even as we see Qasim become a prisoner of the occupation Through the looking glass of War Porn, Scranton reveals the fragile humanity that connects Americans and Iraqis, torturers and the tortured, victors and their victims.

    One thought on “War Porn”

    1. 3 starsAuthor/ex-GI Roy Scranton really must havecojones of steel to take his solidly written take on the Iraq War and plant a ginormous IED for the reader to detonate (with but a few pages to spare) to all but destroy the preceding 350+ pages. Gutsy move (to give an unsympathetic perspective of the returned soldier, one that I'd not quite encountered yet in other novels I've read about the Iraq/Afghanistan conflicts), but it damn near killedWar Porn for me. The ending (which I'm sorry I'm compl [...]

    2. Pornography is usually synonymous with smut, filth and vice; certainly, that definition has increasingly broadened to encompass war efforts. The image of the heroic solider fighting purposefully for a noble cause has been superseded by traumatized young men who are forced to endure repeated tours of duty because of the hubris of our leaders. Anyone who disagrees with the above statement probably is not a good reader for War Porn, written by a war veteran, which does not sugar-coat the reality of [...]

    3. In this lucid, disturbing, subversive, and powerful work, Roy Scranton, an author I had never heard of before, has made it to my top shelf of contemporary American writers. He’s got the nature of Denis Johnson—the attitude and sensibilities, but with his own handcrafted lingual charisma, a book that forces you to pay attention without condescending or pandering to anyone. He writes about lives unwinding even as they coil together, and about worldview opposites whose hypocrisy’s overlap. Sc [...]

    4. As a veteran of the Iraq War, I laud Roy Scranton's War Porn. Finally, an ambitious book from the pen of an ex-enlisted grunt that actually dares to engage the polemical -- and does so with searing artistic depth. The book, in theme and title, is very similar to the one I'm working on (on and off these days) so I had a bit of a fit, but of course it is also very different. Excellent, research at any rate, for me. But it was more than just that.Scranton captures the fetishized ugliness of war wit [...]

    5. This is an adolescent novel.More than fifty years ago, Leslie Fiedler argued that American literature was essentially adolescent, obsessed with escape, uninterested in dealing straightforwardly with sex and death. The thesis applies exactly to this book.In "War Porn." Roy Scranton wants to deal with America's most recent, and most nonsensical war, the invasion of Iraq during the early 2000s. He tells three nested stories: of a barbecue in Utah where a vet meets a clan of hipsters; the experience [...]

    6. I wholeheartedly agree with this review by Joshua Buhs. The writing in this book wasn’t terrible, but despite outward appearances when I dug beneath what was on the page I came up empty. There is no subtlety in the story or the characters, which is something I expect from good literature (and yes, I judge this on a literary scale when the book is marketed as such). My most generous thought for this book is that the whole book is intended to be “war porn” for readers. And yet, I don’t kno [...]

    7. "Up out of the ancient garden of Sinbad's Baghdad and the nightmare of Saddam's Ba'athist dystopia grew the fiber optic slums of tomorrowland, where shepherds on cell phones herded flocks down expressways and insurgents uploaded video beheadings, everything rising and falling as one, Hammurabi's Code and Xboxes, the wheel and the web, Ur to Persepolis to Sykes-Picot to CNN, a ruin outside of time, a twenty-first cyberpunk war machine interzone."

    8. A very difficult book to read but one that seems to be very truthful and accurate. The ending is devastating. Not for casual reading.

    9. It's important that Iraqi veterans right books of their experience, and that these books are harsh, honest, and full of the pain of war. So we know not to do it anymore. Yet, this book intentionally left me mentally raped, drained of all human. So, why the fuck would I read a book like this? I'm angry that his English PhD and a decade of carefully crafted effort could leave me nothing of value.I really liked the depictions of American Grunt life, the futility. This struck me as true, as from his [...]

    10. The best thing about War Porn is the narration of the politics and War, and to achieve such goal, it never makes the war sentimental. The sentimentality of dark sides of the war is narrated within the background of observable political views. I loved the notes at the beginning of each chapter describing the author's view in a half-independent way from the story. Another good point is that the violence among soldiers is surprising. You will become amazed by the patriarchal language among the sold [...]

    11. In War Porn, Roy Scranton looks at the second Iraq war from the perspective of three very different people at three different times in the war. The stories are extremely powerful. Moreover, it makes you look at the war and its impact in a whole different light.Mr. Scranton has a way with words. He introduces each change in narrator with a hybrid stream of consciousness and poetry vignette that make for some of the most powerful sections of the entire book. Within each narrative, he paints a pict [...]

    12. If one measure of a book is the reaction it provokes in a reader, then "War Porn" gets 5 Stars. The story is told in a number of voices, set in a number of geographical locations, over a period of a few years. Much of the book cries out, albeit indirectly, for George W. Bush, Donald Rumsfeld, their sycophantic liars in the CIA, the journalistic community and Congress, to be tortured and slaughtered, not as the Coalition soldiers were, or the Iraqi civilians or the Iraqi armed forces were, but in [...]

    13. War PornThis is the first book I have read that tells the truth about Iraq and the continual war there and in Afghanistan.

    14. Gut wrenching and unexpected ending, helps to show the true costs of war and the scars that will never heal.

    15. As long as there has been literature, there have been war stories. Ever since I started this one, a novel from Iraq War veteran Roy Scranton, I've been enthralled. Even though it took me a while to finish because of being busy from school, I'm glad I've finally finished it. When it comes to war literature, there tends to be two avenues; the first has a tendency to have a gung ho, patriotic, "we were the good guys all around" vibe, while the second, usually coming some time after the conflict, lo [...]

    16. So many people complaining about the characters, the ending, the whatever. My understanding is that there is only one character in this book, and all the people moving about their stories, wondering, talking, doing or not doing, are all just faces of that one character, the only one that matters: the war itself.The end didn't irritate me, it walked in time to the very real marching tune of emotional exhaustion, belligerent meaninglessness, and smaller, hometown violence that has been claiming ev [...]

    17. This is a terrible book. The characters are flat, underdeveloped and cliche ridden. What plot there is is threadbare and basic. This is a book that does not deserve to be in my shelves.

    18. War Porn (2016) by Roy Scranton is not a book to be easily read. To be read, yes, but not easily. Often mentioned in lists of “best contemporary war fiction,” and long on my reading list, it was sent to me by a friend who is as confounded as I am by mankind’s continuous rallying to the flag of war despite the mountains of bodies over which it flies.Earlier, “first wave” participant written books from the Iraq and Afghanistan invasions, as one reviewer has called them, share certain the [...]

    19. If your anger about the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq has lost its edge, Roy Scranton’s debut novel, War Porn, will help you recommit. It takes a while to appreciate the disjointed quality of the plot, which hopscotches back and forth through the lives of two U.S. soldiers, Specialist Wilson, whose deployment to Iraq transforms him from a poet nice-guy into something else, and a National Guard military police officer, Aaron Stojanowski, who returns stateside jagged and dangerous. In wri [...]

    20. Don't know why, but I enjoy reading fiction about war. It started with Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo, worked through Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried and Going after Cacciato and now, War Porn by Roy Scranton. After listening to this interview, nwpr/post/fire-and-forget-, rebroadcast for the debut of Scranton's new book, War Porn. At 4/5 through I find the book difficult to read because of the senselessness of so many things that happen to the characters in the book. While there is pl [...]

    21. I didn't give this book less than 3 stars because I found it hard to put down. I also wouldn't give it more than 3 stars because as much as I enjoyed it and as much as I think it is well-written I thought that there was too much focus on what happened in Iraq and not enough focus on what it meant and the aftermath. But that is just my personal opinion and it obviously wasn't the direction that he wanted to take it. It's just at a certain point the iraq experience is overkill. I think we have bee [...]

    22. Bought this based upon reviews in NY Times, LA Times, & coverage on "The Millions" but feel like I fell for hype. It really feels like much less than it is billed as - was expecting something new to be said but his general premise seems to be: "War is bad." Perhaps in America this is a surprising view & thus the praise from the above mentioned publications. The writing is passable, not exceptional. The bookending story of a somewhat psychotic returning vet feels forced & somewhat fak [...]

    23. While I enjoyed Scranton's articles in the New York Times and his previous book, "Learning to die in the Anthropocene," I couldn't get into this one. The writing style changes from prose to nearly free-form verse as it changes time periods from present day to flashbacks to the Iraq war. I found it distracting and overwrought with unearned drama.

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