A Lodging for the Night

A Lodging for the Night It was late in November The snow fell over Paris with rigorous relentless persistence sometimes the wind made a sally and scattered it in flying vortices sometimes there was a lull and flake af

  • Title: A Lodging for the Night
  • Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 172
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • It was late in November 1456 The snow fell over Paris with rigorous, relentless persistence sometimes the wind made a sally and scattered it in flying vortices sometimes there was a lull, and flake after flake descended out of the black night air, silent, circuitous, interminable To poor people, looking up under moist eyebrows, it seemed a wonder where it all came fromIt was late in November 1456 The snow fell over Paris with rigorous, relentless persistence sometimes the wind made a sally and scattered it in flying vortices sometimes there was a lull, and flake after flake descended out of the black night air, silent, circuitous, interminable To poor people, looking up under moist eyebrows, it seemed a wonder where it all came from Master Francis Villon had propounded an alternative that afternoon, at a tavern window was it only Pagan Jupiter plucking geese upon Olympus, or were the holy angels moulting He was only a poor Master of Arts, he went on and as the question somewhat touched upon divinity, he durst not venture to conclude A silly old priest from Montargis, who was among the company, treated the young rascal to a bottle of wine in honor of the jest and the grimaces with which it was accompanied, and swore on his own white beard that he had been just such another irreverent dog when he was Villon s age.

    One thought on “A Lodging for the Night”

    1. The ill-fated adventure that was the life of the poet François Villon (1431-1463?) inspired this short story. Stevenson imagines a bleak and snowy night in Paris and then discusses the concepts of honor, social status and the human instinct to survive.'You may still repent and change.''I repent daily,' said the poet. 'There are few people more given to repentance than poor Francis. As for change, let somebody change my circumstances. A man must continue to eat, if it were only that he may conti [...]

    2. This is my favorite Stevenson short story, and one of my favorites of all-time. When I was just a boy, I was given a copy of a book of great short stories. I cannot recall the title, but it had stories that changed how I thought of literature. Some of the stories included; Marjorie Daw, The Lottery, The Lady's Juggler, The Leader of the People, and, of course, A Lodging for the Night.What I admire about this story is that the issues raised are still argued today. Stevenson, Dickens, and Steinbec [...]

    3. Read on QuestiaI'm not entirely sure what the point of this is. (Well, I'm sure Stevenson enjoyed writing it, and it was part of the nineteenth century revival of late medieval Parisian poet Francois Villon) The story gives an account of what happened when Villon was implicated in the murder of a priest in Paris in 1456. Yet Stevenson doesn't even use the few available facts, which could easily form the skeleton of a story more interesting than this stabbing at a card game - a scene that now see [...]

    4. I really don't understand the reason of writing this short story. Completely out of my league.Not a bit close to what was expected from such a famous writer.

    5. ما هى أولويات الإنسان؟ القيم أم الإشباع الجسدي؟هل يختلف حكمنا على نفس الفعل باختلاف فاعله؟هذا ما يسأله ستيفنسون في تحفة قصيرة أخرى من إبداعاتهالبطل "فرانسيس" قاطع طريق يتصادف في مساء جليدي ان يدخل بيت احد النبلاء و يستضيفه النيبل حتى الصباحو عندما يبدأ الرجلان في الحديث يشت [...]

    6. Free download available at Project Gutenberg.Opening lines:It was late in November, 1456. The snow fell over Paris with rigorous, relentless persistence; sometimes the wind made a sally and scattered it in flying vortices; sometimes there was a lull, and flake after flake descended out of the black night air, silent, circuitous, interminable. To poor people, looking up under moist eyebrows, it seemed a wonder where it all came from. Master Francis Villon had propounded an alternative that aftern [...]

    7. I'm not a fan of short stories, but I have several volumes of The World's 100 Best Short Stories: Volume 1 - Adventure published in 1927. I was pleased to see that this volume had several renown authors including Robert Louis Stevenson, O. Henry, Bret Hart and Victor Hugo. I chose to read the Robert Louis Stevenson A Lodging for the Night.The beauty of the short story is just that, it can be finished quickly however, to me it lacks the depth and totality of a novel and one takes away only a spli [...]

    8. Beautiful languageHigh up overhead the snow settled among the traceryof the cathedral towers. Many a niche was drifted full; many a statuewore a long white bonnet on its grotesque or sainted head. The gargoyleshad been transformed into great false noses, drooping toward the point.The crockets were like upright pillows swollen on one side. In theintervals of the wind there was a dull sound dripping about theprecincts of the church.- Robert Louis Stevenson, A Lodging for the Night

    9. This was a very interesting story. In this story, as well as a lot of other Stevensons stories, there is the meeting of two different classes of people, like the rich and poor. In this story, however, is a meeting of a honorable night and a dishonorable scoundral. You see two points of view of life and it makes for an interesting conversation between the two.

    10. I think this is 1 or 2 on my all time best short story listIt is quinetssential Stevenson, and as usual he is on the side of the little guy. Making the hero an actual historical person makes it even better.

    11. I think this is honestly one of the best stories I have ever read. Probably my favorite next to Crime and Punishment and Wuthering Heights. Brilliant.

    12. Great writing yet again! Love the morbid hints while at the same time creating an actual plot having a perfect take away.

    13. Not the best he's ever written, and only marginally saved by the great parallel made between soldiers and thieves. However, as it is, it is a good piece of philosophy.

    14. The main message of this book is the difference between people. Even though individuals can interact, they don't understand each other sometimes. For example, rich people don't get poor ones; uneducated people find some difficulties talking to educated. These kind fringes I was able to see in this story.

    15. My least favourite of Stevenson's works. The story felt like it was really slow and that nothing majorly important happened. I did stop half way through to try his other short stories. No sense in pushing through a novel as if it were a chore.

    16. Currently reading a ton of short stories so I can complete the reading challenge. This story was pretty good. It was short, but the point came across quite well and I wasn't left thinking, "what exactly just happened?" Like with Jekyll and Hyde and The Bodysnatcher.

    17. I loved Stevenson's use of language in this short story. On the other hand, I feel as if I read the prologue of a novel, but didn't read the rest of the novel I'm missing the point somehow.

    18. The beginning part of the plot was somewhat intriguing but soon turned into an uninteresting ethical debate between a veteran and a thief.

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