The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race

The Latinos of Asia How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race Is race only about the color of your skin In The Latinos of Asia Anthony Christian Ocampo shows that what color you are depends largely on your social context Filipino Americans for example helped

  • Title: The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race
  • Author: Anthony Christian Ocampo
  • ISBN: 9780804797542
  • Page: 245
  • Format: Paperback
  • Is race only about the color of your skin In The Latinos of Asia, Anthony Christian Ocampo shows that what color you are depends largely on your social context Filipino Americans, for example, helped establish the Asian American movement and are classified by the U.S Census as Asian But the legacy of Spanish colonialism in the Philippines means that they share many cIs race only about the color of your skin In The Latinos of Asia, Anthony Christian Ocampo shows that what color you are depends largely on your social context Filipino Americans, for example, helped establish the Asian American movement and are classified by the U.S Census as Asian But the legacy of Spanish colonialism in the Philippines means that they share many cultural characteristics with Latinos, such as last names, religion, and language Thus, Filipinos color their sense of connection with other racial groups changes depending on their social context.The Filipino story demonstrates how immigration is changing the way people negotiate race, particularly in cities like Los Angeles where Latinos and Asians now constitute a collective majority Amplifying their voices, Ocampo illustrates how second generation Filipino Americans racial identities change depending on the communities they grow up in, the schools they attend, and the people they befriend Ultimately, The Latinos of Asia offers a window into both the racial consciousness of everyday people and the changing racial landscape of American society.

    One thought on “The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race”

    1. I have a lot of mixed feelings about this book and unfortunately it seemed to emphasize the feeling of otherness that I have never quite be able to shake. I am not from a large family. I did not grow up on the west coast. I did not participate in any Filipino organizations nor have I ever been misidentified as being anything other than Filipino. I liked the book but I didn't love it. I wish the author ventured outside of Southern California.

    2. I had so many mixed feeling when I was reading this. There were times that I thought "Hey, that was me too!" and others I was like, "What?!?"What I wished throughout the book was that Ocampo included Filipinos from other communities. All of the Filipinos that were interviewed for this book were from either Carson or Eagle Rock and their experience was much different than mine. These are cities with huge Filipino communities and are synonymous with being Filipino. I grew up in Hacienda Heights, w [...]

    3. A much needed book in the dialogue of Filipino-ness. While knowing that race is an artificial construct, Ocampo utilises the modern Filipino-American narrative in weaving a complex and adaptable Filipino identity, that struggles in a society of categories and checkboxes.I was a little disappointed that the book's studies were entirely with second-generation Filipino-Americans and not in a wider, more international context (I am Canadian myself). However, hopefully this will be a conversation sta [...]

    4. This is a comprehensive look at one very specific subset of Filipino-Americans - Ocampo clearly did a huge amount of research for this book, and his writing style is conversational and accessible. Definitely a fascinating insight into this group of people, but like others have said, has its limitations. For me, personally, I went into this book hoping to be affirmed and validated with each page - but it turned out to kind of have the opposite effect. My own experience was pretty much the polar o [...]

    5. I wish this book existed over two decades ago when my family and I immigrated to the U.S and there was so much confusion about which racial category we belonged to. We came from a region of the Philippines that spoke Chavacano — one of the only Spanish-creole languages found in Southeast Asia (and a clear remnant of Spanish colonization.) Our names and faces “looked Latino,” but our birthplace was located in Asia. Trying to determine one’s identity based on a social construct was extreme [...]

    6. While the research behind the book is limited in scope, the overarching issues of panethnicity and identity are fascinating and important. Much of the personal experiences shared in the book rang true for me as a multiracial person who grew up in Southern Nevada.

    7. Loved this book bc, for me at least, it was an accurate depiction of my racial identity as a Filipino American.

    8. Interesting book but too narrow in scope. After hearing about the book via an NPR interview with the author it sounded like an intriguing read. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are increasingly visible and were recently projected to surpass Latinos as the largest immigrant group to the United States. So this seemed like a good read.Author Ocampo looks at a groupf of Filipino adults in Southern California and basically has them share their experiences. Childhood, school, growing up, g [...]

    9. Having both Filipino and latino friends, this book articulated well thoughts I had after seeing them engage with one another and being around both families. It was interesting because even I had made a subconscious separation of Filipino from East/South Asians just because of differences in culture, personalities, family and academic life, as well as appearance.The part about being treated as 'Asian' in some regards to schooling and then 'Latino' in others was fascinating to see. The book did a [...]

    10. I read this book & it gave good insight on how the Filipino & Mexican/Latino community have many cultural similarities in the concepts of family, religion, & to a certain extend language. Even though Filipinos are labeled as Asian, their culture is more in tune in with Latinos. The author makes these observations in with examples from different cities throughout California, but it seems the author is mostly concentrated in SoCal as there are no direct reference examples from NorCal c [...]

    11. The author posits that Filipinos may be more culturally alike Latinos than Asians. His arguments helped clarify my own thoughts over the years about being Flilpino in a cogent way. Most convincing of his argument is the history and impact of the Philippines being colonized by Spain and the U.S. He interviews young Filipino adults who grew up in two California towns with dominantly Filipino and Latino populations. He does acknowledge the focus on this group and that Filipinos growing up in other [...]

    12. As a hapa Fil-Am raised in the Bay Area, reading this felt both incredibly familiar and unbelievably alienating. Ocampo's research showed me moments of "yep, I recognize those elements of 1st-gen Filipino-American families from my interactions with more 'pure' Fil-Am families through my grandparents," alternated with revelations about why my mixed family was mostly not like those described, and how whiteness affected this. Still, even if I still didn't "see ME" in this, it was an informative nex [...]

    13. The book deals with the complicated issue of race and ethnicity within the Filipino community. Where ones perceived racial identity are influenced by several factors like environment, education, the work place etc. Highly readable, provocative and informative book that deals on the complexity of what is to be a Filipino in America.

    14. A great read!This book affirmed so many of my life experiences growing up as a Filipino in southern California. More importantly, the author also captured experiences where I too felt out of place in different social settings. I will definitely recommend this book to friend's.

    15. Finally! A book that discusses the uniqueness of the Filipino. A great beginning to the discussion of Filipino-American identity and a much needed discussion in today's world.

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