Doing Her Bit: A Story About the Woman's Land Army of America

Doing Her Bit A Story About the Woman s Land Army of America Based on true events this fictional story traces the history of the Women s Land Army during World War I Real life Farmerette Helen Stevens trains to farm the land negotiates a position for herself

  • Title: Doing Her Bit: A Story About the Woman's Land Army of America
  • Author: Erin Hagar JenHill
  • ISBN: 9781580896467
  • Page: 358
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Based on true events, this fictional story traces the history of the Women s Land Army during World War I Real life Farmerette Helen Stevens trains to farm the land, negotiates a position for herself and other women, and does her bit for the war effort This unique book celebrates the true grit of American men and women.

    One thought on “Doing Her Bit: A Story About the Woman's Land Army of America”

    1. It never ceases to amaze me how women came to be known as the weaker sex. In yet another historical example of how breaking down ridiculous stereotypes can benefit everyone, here we find that World War I has taken many of the male farm laborers and sent them to war. Who can do their work? Who, indeed. Well, not to spoil it for you, but the women do it. They train and they learn and they work, and they bring in the harvest. It's a shocking twist, one you would never have seen coming. The illustra [...]

    2. Children’s books can be a springboard for discussion. A new book about American women’s efforts on the home front, entertains and educates about the World War I era, a period in history youngsters might not be familiar with. “Doing her Bit, A Story about the Woman’s Land Army of America,” by Erin Hagar, is a page turner for children in grades 1-4, and for families who’ll be equally mesmerized by the story of Helen Stevens.Readers meet Helen, a New York City girl in 1917, when she’s [...]

    3. Engaging and inspiring story about a little known group of women who "did their bit" during WWI when there was a shortage of farm workers. Read this aloud to students or ask small groups or student pairs to read and then think about questions like, "How does the author use the metaphor of a rock to describe and develop the character of Ida?" and "How do the women persevere or show determination in this story?" and "What was unfair about how the women were treated in this story? What does that re [...]

    4. In 1917, American men had left the farms to make more money in factories or to train to be a soldier, but the war in Europe was placing an increased demand on American resources like wheat, and people were needed to work on the farms. So, girls like Helen joined the Women’s Land Army, where they were trained to work on a farm, and (hopefully) hired by farmers needing good hard workers. This is a story based on real life events. Initially, these women had a hard time getting hired by the farmer [...]

    5. This is a picture book really aimed at school-aged kids, rather than preschoolers.Based on real events from the period of World War I, this fictionalized account of a real program is very informative, as well as fun. Young women were trained as farmers in 1917 and 1918, to help produce food for the war effort and to send to England. This is not only an interesting story, but has notes and illustrations about the real program. Getting blisters from working in a field isn't as dramatic as treating [...]

    6. What an interesting picture book! This story, based in fact, takes place during World War 1, an often overlooked era in children's books. Helen wants to serve her country, but doesn't know exactly how she can until she learns about the Women's Land Army of America, a group that teaches women farming techniques so they can replace male workers who leave to fight. But will the girls be able to win over the farmers? Interesting and rewarding read.

    7. This fiction story is based on real events and people. I love to read about parts of history I never heard of before. This is one of those stories. Helen Stevens was a city girl. She never worked on a farm in her life. She read that the Woman's Land Army was looking for women to become farmers during WWI to replace the men who left for war and better paying factory jobs. Helen trained on a farm for 2 weeks. She learned that potatoes don't grow on trees. She learned to plant and plow and hoe unti [...]

    8. An inspiring look at the "farmerettes" who took the place of the men that went off to fight in World War I. Recommended for grades 2 & up.

    9. Who knew? 15,000 female "farmerettes" were trained to work the fields, tend the livestock and generally help out farmers back in the USA while men were fighting the Great War, WWI, in Europe.

    10. 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of America's entry into World War I. And, with most of the men now working in munitions factories, or enlisting and fighting, the country's farm crops were on the verge of being ruined without anyone to care for them. And so it was the Women's Land Army to the rescue.Using a typical woman as her protagonist, Erin Hager presents the story of the Women's Land Army or farmerettes as they were called. Helen Stevens is a young college student living in New York City w [...]

    11. A fictional story based upon true events follows college student Helen Stevens during the summer of 1917 as the "New York City college girl" learns farming to support the war effort as part of the Woman's Land Army of America.

    12. This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, everyone! Today, we read Doing Her Bit: A Story About The Woman’s Land Army Of America, written by Erin Hagar and illustrated by Jen Hill, a story based on true events about just some of the wartime efforts that brave ladies volunteered to do during WWI.During the first World War, a young woman named Helen wants very much to help her country, but knitting socks for the soldiers just do [...]

    13. Hagar, Erin Doing Her Bit : A Story About the Women’s Land Army of America, illustrated by Jen Hill. PICTUREBOOK. Charlesbridge, 2016. $16.95. Content: G. In 1917, American men had left the farms to make more money in factories or to train to be a soldier, but the war in Europe was placing an increased demand on American resources like wheat, and people were needed to work on the farms. So, girls like Helen joined the Women’s Land Army, where they were trained to work on a farm, and (hopeful [...]

    14. During World War II there was a lack of farm labor because of the number of men being soldiers. So the government set up a program recruiting women to help fill the void. These women were called farmerettes. Helen Stevens was one such woman. She joined the program and spent several weeks being trained in the incredibly back-breaking work that farms require. Plowing, weeding, milking, livestock tending, and fence mending were all covered. These ladies worked through blisters, sore muscles, and ex [...]

    15. A picture book depicting how women became useful during World War I in the United States. This story is about women being trained to work on a farm. Connect to the curriculum in Social Studies and Science.

    16. well written and researched. Could have been improved by acknowledgement/irony of the difficulty immigrant farm workers face since WWII which, of course, was much greater than that faced by these women.

    17. Another bit of history I was unaware of, remedied by a picture book. This fictionalized account of the Woman's Land Army is engaging and illustrated in a homey folk art style.

    18. This was a great story about woman learning to farm during World War I so they could take the men's jobs and help produce for the country. Preschool and up for topic.

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