We March Against England: Operation Sea Lion, 1940-41

We March Against England Operation Sea Lion In May Nazi Germany was master of continental Europe the only European power still standing was Great Britain and the all conquering German armed forces stood poised to cross the channel Follo

  • Title: We March Against England: Operation Sea Lion, 1940-41
  • Author: Robert Forczyk
  • ISBN: 9781472814852
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In May, 1940, Nazi Germany was master of continental Europe, the only European power still standing was Great Britain and the all conquering German armed forces stood poised to cross the channel Following the destruction of the RAF fighter forces, the sweeping of the channel of mines, and the wearing down of the Royal Naval defenders, two German army groups were set to sIn May, 1940, Nazi Germany was master of continental Europe, the only European power still standing was Great Britain and the all conquering German armed forces stood poised to cross the channel Following the destruction of the RAF fighter forces, the sweeping of the channel of mines, and the wearing down of the Royal Naval defenders, two German army groups were set to storm the beaches of southern England Despite near constant British fears from August to October, the invasion never took place after first being postponed to spring 1941, before finally being abandoned entirely.Robert Forcyzk, author of Where the Iron Crosses Grow, looks beyond the traditional British account of Operation Sea lion, complete with plucky Home Guards and courageous Spitfire pilots, at the real scale of German ambition, plans and capabilities He examines, in depth, how Operation Sea Lion fitted in with German air sea actions around the British Isles as he shows exactly what stopped Hitler from invading Britain.

    One thought on “We March Against England: Operation Sea Lion, 1940-41”

    1. Reasonable overview of SealionRobert Forczyk has delivered a reasonable overview of Sealion with some interesting strategic options I hadn't considered. However, in my view the book is let down by some implausible theories of German naval capabilities.That being said it was not too dry and an entertaining read.

    2. While the author presents a well researched order of battle, his speculations about what could and couldn't be done are somewhere between doubtful and outlandish. Undeniable weaknesses in the British forces are explained in detail while similar or worse weaknesses on the German are handwaved away or ignored. For example, the author refers to the low visibility in the English Channel as an obstacle to Royal Navy interceptors (reasonable enough), but said visibility never comes into play when he a [...]

    3. Book received from NetGalleyI had heard about Operation Sea Lion prior to reading this book but I had no clue what it was. World War II history is too "new" for me to really enjoy reading or studying about it. I learned quite a bit from this book and now I want to know more about this early part of World War II.

    4. It's a pile of contrarian revisionist crap with the typical dearth of supporting evidence for overturning decades of well-supported historical interpretations.

    5. The Hitler Diaries were a peculiar farrago of fact and fabrication. One of the more inspired lies that the forgery contained was the claim that Hitler’s decision to halt his Panzers and allow the bulk of the British Expeditionary Force to evacuate at Dunkirk was because he did not want to inflict too devastating a blow because he still hoped that the British government might come to its senses and make its peace with Nazi Germany.The reason why this seemed so plausible was because Hitler’s a [...]

    6. Forczyk makes the case that Germany could have mounted Operation Sea Lion and, at least, been successful in bringing the UK to the negotiating table and armistice. The book is fascinating in its detail of the British armed forces' weakness and preparations and the German armed forces' preparations and strengths and weaknesses. He lays these out in detail and in well organized fashion. He then has a short walk through of a middling successful Operation Sea Lion scenario and includes a couple of s [...]

    7. A good book, providing an across the spectrum analysis of the British-German conflict in 1940 to 1941. Though mostly centered on Operation Sea Lion, the planned German invasion of Britain, this book dives into a wider view of the global aspects of WWII at the time: the slow buildup to the convoy battles in the Atlantic, the growing strategic bombing campaign underway by the RAF, and the many German alternatives to the invasion. Stopping just short of an alternate history escapade, the author sma [...]

    8. "We March Against England" starts slowly, and then builds to an awesome conclusion. At the start, I was not thrilled to read accounts of the war as it started until May 1940 or so. But then, the author throws matters into high gear in parsing all the factors that made Germany and Britain perhaps less mighty than current historiography argues. He pulls no punches lashing out at other historians as well as Churchill and Hitler. The parts about espionage and why Spain didn't join the axis are parti [...]

    9. Found it in my library and found it a well researched book. It is a book that looks with a new eye on the conflict in England in 1940.The author offers an alternative view of the Battle of Britain and the proposed invasion of the UK (sea lion) arguing the Germans could have landed a first wave even with a strong RAF. The problem would have been to reinforce and resupply the army. The invasion would have stalled forcing Hitler to withdrawn his army.It is a book that is well researched and full of [...]

    10. This book is an onverall analysis of Germany war against England between the Fall of France and Barbarossa. The author gives a lot of detail of the capabilties of the germans in Spetember 1940 to mount operation sea lion. The authors alos talks about the anti-invasion capabilities of great-Britain. There even two counterfactuals chapters, one of Sea Lion in September 1940 and another on options of raiding with a commando the Isle of Wight. A must have for anybody interested in Sea Lion and the s [...]

    11. Probably the most interesting read that I have had in some time! I have read several of his books now, including the superb Where the Iron Crosses Grow. Unlike many historians, Robert has a gift for writing in a way that is detailed, yet interesting and well paced. He is a story teller rather than a figures/statistics regurgitator. Anyway, We March Against England goes into tremendous detail about the planned amphibious invasion of England by the Third Reich named Operation Sea Lion. Robert goes [...]

    12. It had its good points and its let me tell you again points. Very good on technical details and many good points on things not usually considered.

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