The Vampire of Northanger (Unnatural Austen, #1)

The Vampire of Northanger Unnatural Austen Catherine Morland nobody s picture of the heroine of a novel is a sheltered young lady who is mad for gothic novels especially ones with vampires Thirsting for adventure she leaps at the opportunity

  • Title: The Vampire of Northanger (Unnatural Austen, #1)
  • Author: Bryce C. Anderson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 491
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Catherine Morland nobody s picture of the heroine of a novel is a sheltered young lady who is mad for gothic novels, especially ones with vampires Thirsting for adventure, she leaps at the opportunity to holiday in Bath But the city is filled with perils, threatening to plunge our hapless heroine into violence or impropriety Vampires walk the streets at night, preyiCatherine Morland nobody s picture of the heroine of a novel is a sheltered young lady who is mad for gothic novels, especially ones with vampires Thirsting for adventure, she leaps at the opportunity to holiday in Bath But the city is filled with perils, threatening to plunge our hapless heroine into violence or impropriety Vampires walk the streets at night, preying upon the unwary, and than one has designs upon Catherine herself Cross and stake at the ready, the charming, awkward Miss Morland navigates Bath society even as she takes up the vampire hunting trade A wealthy but eccentric family, the Tilneys, take an interest in her, and Catherine finds herself captivated by their quick witted son, Henry Tilney As the danger in Bath grows, the Tilneys extend Catherine an invitation to join them at their estate, the ancient Northanger Abbey There she will face unexpected dangers and discover hidden strengths But will Catherine s adventure end in matrimony or in bloodshed The Vampire of Northanger is a funny, violent romp through a supernatural England, inspired by Jane Austen s classic novel, Northanger Abbey.

    One thought on “The Vampire of Northanger (Unnatural Austen, #1)”

    1. This Jane Austen-vampire mash-up is a clever use of the familiar and the macabre. Of all the Austen novels one might add some horror to, Northanger Abbey is the perfect choice, because it is about "horrid" thrillers and their avid readers. Anderson makes excellent use of the characters and situations provided by Austen and then adds a gothic layer, turning some of well-known characters into vampires and others into vampire hunters. Catherine Morland is her usual self: the atypical heroine we hap [...]

    2. It was really long, but a solidly enjoyable romp through Jane Austen's world. Not that Austen needs vampires or anything. Overall, I found myself wanting to return to this book. (The Monk was once described as "a page turner, but there are a lot of pages to turn." This book was similar. It doesn't usually take me more than a day to read a novel.)I feel like this book is way better if you've read Northanger Abbey and probably some of Ann Radcliffe's books and also The Monk (aka, if you're familia [...]

    3. The Vampire of Northanger steadily builds momentum until, by the end, I was  practically unable to stop turning the pages. I experienced a similar compulsion with another of Anderson’s novels. However, I almost failed to read this novel at all. Initially, I was defeated by the essay that established that this was Austen’s first novel, a spoof of the scholarly essays found at the beginning of the more staid Austen volumes (the ones without vampires). Unfortunately, the parody was a bit too g [...]

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